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Posts tagged ‘Hotels/facilities’

Painter’s World: The Pro-Labor of Painting

Understanding and implementing labor strategies should be important to everyone who has a job. That is, perhaps with the exception of management. They tend to look out for the needs of the company.

 

Yet, both sides need each other to keep the business in business. They need each other to get the work done in an efficient, qualitative and cost effective manner. When this employee-employer relationship disappears, your job disappears.

 

In the painting trade, which is similar to all labor-intensive trade, the worker expects a fair wage for a reasonable day’s work. Employers expect and work hard to get as much work out of their employees as possible. I agree, as long as the employees’ health and safety are given the attention they deserve.

 

As a painter, what do you really want in the workplace? If asked, I would say (1) to feel appreciated, (2) to be respected, and (3) to be treated as a professional.

 

How are these objectives achieved?  From the standpoint of the employer-employee relationship?

 

1. Professional treatment. As the painter/employee, you know your job and what is required in order to keep it. And, on a consistent basis, you make every effort to perform your tasks in a responsible, productive manner.

 

2. Respect. As the painter/employee, you need certain provisions to be in place. Some of the more important ones include the respect and consideration of the employer, the tools to do the work, and enough time to do the work properly. (About tools: To start, painters need good quality brushes, roller covers, and reliable spray equipment.)

 

3. Appreciation. As a painter/employee, you have the right to have a safe, non-threatening environment in which to work. Both you and your employer have the responsibility to make sure it exists.

TIP A: When the employer drags his heels, be patient. And, try to find out why. Is it due to the cost and an unavailable budget? Consult your supervisor first; then your management or employer. It may be due to the cost of making it so.

TIP B: Don’t dismiss the need to pursue any possible resolution to the problem (s). Be patient.

TIP C: In an extreme case –eg. high toxicity, hazardous chemicals – OHSA (Occupational Health and Safety Administration) can guide you in the best direction.

 

4. Productivity issues. Organize an employee meeting as a group with your supervisor. Clearly (and truthfully) explain anything which keeps you from doing your job efficiently. CAUTION: Don’t blame or accuse anyone personally. Be tactful.

 

5. Wage/Salary issues. Fair wage/ salary is also on a painter’s mind. Don’t think about how much the company is making, or the salary raises for management. Instead, make known the value of your service to the company. Emphasize how you strive to do your best every day.

TIP A: If you must self-pay 100 percent of your health insurance, politely indicate that an increase in wage would be greatly appreciated.

 

 Now, using a more tactical response…

 

First, make sure you are doing all that you can to comply with company policy, productivity and employee regulations. If that fails to help you achieve any goals, follow one or all of the following objectives. NOTE: Some are more proactive than others.

 

1.Prepare yourself for presenting your concerns and issues.

 

TIP A: Write down a list of employee rights that your employer has denied you, and possibly others in the workforce. Make sure they are entitlements guaranteed under the law. Examples: lunch time (30 minutes or more), break availability, extended break time if necessary, compensation for work-related supplies, uniform requirements, workmen’s compensation, employer insurance payments, etc.

TIP B: Read then reread the company’s operations manual, if they issued one. Carefully make a note of any discrepancies or contradictions in their policies and procedures. Especially any that specifically relate to your department, or any other department with which you deal regularly.

TIP C: Compile definitive proof of misconduct on the part of the employer. File in a secure place.

TIP D: Find out the concerns and issues of other staff painters that you know in the region. What grievances do you share, and to what extent?

NOTE: In this process, your employer will probably look for ways to discredit you, starting with your attendance record.

CAUTION: It’s probable that you will lose your job sooner than later, be demoted, or be moved into another position at a different, less desirable location.

 

2. Ultimate response in labor relations. The painter/employee and employer relationship is based on group strength and unity. A number of painters standing together over a legitimate health and safety, or wage, issue can get better results with the employer, especially when you possess concrete and well supported evidence.

TIP A: It’s very possible that, through negotiation and mediation, a fair settlement can be achieved. Resulting in a win-win-win solution for everyone.

CAUTION: The painters may win the case; but they may have difficulty finding new jobs.

 

3. File a formal grievance. Depending on your issue, start with the following: Federal Wage Board/U. S. Department of Labor, OHSA, and EEOC. There are other agencies and organizations that may like to know about your problem.

CAUTION A: Especially when employee safety and health are concerned, fines could be levied until the employer sees fit to comply with the law. Some employers will initiate positive changes promptly. They do not want Federal sanctions on their books. Others will drag their heels, pay the fines at will, and refuse to comply.

CAUTION B: In the painter’s case, he may win or lose. This depends on whether or not the employer wants to do the right thing and improve working conditions.

CAUTION C: The employer may do nothing about the situation. But the employer will find probable cause to terminate you. Example: Employers, in any defendant’s hot seat, tend to shift the responsibility and costs to you. They will brand you as an difficult employee.

 

4. Promptly, locate another job. And resign from your present one.

CAUTION A: You may lose out. Especially if you like your current job, have a solid work record and possess growth opportunities.

CAUTION B: Consider that your job may not be secure at that point. The employer may have already been planning to hire someone to replace you.

 

5. Consider the option to start your own business. Especially if you have a good-to-excellent reputation in the field, possess some great connections and can float a low cash flow for two-to-five years before realizing a net profit. It can be a new beginning where you have control.

CAUTION A: Just remember that you become the employer now, just in case you hire anyone. Think of what you went through.

CAUTION B: Do you want, and are you able, to function well on the other side of the employer-employee scale?

 

BOTTOM LINE: As the labor-employee side of work, you must live up to your responsibility as designated by the employer. If not done, this will produce grounds for discipline or dismissal.

 

Your best asset is your service record. It can be a powerful, high-leverage weapon, when you are negotiating.

 

Validate your position. Hold your ground. Rally for support. And press on. Labor relations is about strength and commitment.

 

Points to Ponder:

  1. What do you have at stake in pursuing any grievance? Examples: current job; chances for promotion; wage/salary increases; benefit upgrades; growth opportunities in your field with other employers, or as an independent; family finances.
  2. Can you afford the potential short-term and long-term losses, and fallouts?

 

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Thank you for reading “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paintshop: Hind-sight Hurricane/Natural Disaster Preparedness

As Hurricane Matthew sauntered to the eastern coast of Florida, the adrenaline kicked in. The list of survival strategies woke me before dawn the day before it was expected to hit land. My feet hit the carpet in a sprint to complete the tasks on our preparedness list.

 

My sister is a veteran preparer for and survivor of category 4 or 5 hurricanes. A pro by my definition, she not only shoulders the responsibility for securing a large home. Also she is responsible for fifteen retail stores in Florida.

 

I, on the other hand, have only four major hurricanes under my belt. With number 5 – Matthew – on its way.

 

 

Major Hurricane/Storm Preparedness Tips for Hotel/Facility Painters

 

1. Throw into dumpster everything that you should have discarded before now.

 

2. Try to prioritize supplies, tools and equipment as follows:

A. Which do you and teammates use the most?

B. Which would be the hardest to replace?

C. Which would cost the most to replace?

    TIP: Then, secure all of the above the best that you can. Get some help to do this.

 

3. TIP: Keep some recovery-type tools accessible such as hammers, screw drivers, battery-operated drills, and heavy duty flashlights.

 

4. Move everything down inside the paintshop. Onto the floor and into the corners of each room in the shop. In the heaviest storage cabinets – solid steel or heavy wood, move items onto the bottom shelves.

 

5. Make certain that all containers’ lids and covers are very tight. You don’t want the wind’s force to blow or pop off paint and solvent can lids. You don’t want it to work off solvent container caps; caulking tube covers, adhesive bucket lids, etc. Note: Minimize your potential clean-up mess as much as possible.

 

6. Use duct tape to tape shut the inside plastic wrapping/tube that houses rolls of wallcoverings. Then, use duct tape to tightly close outer shipping box of each roll. Then, either move boxes of wallcoverings into corners of inside wall closet, or the inner corners of paintshop or restroom.

 

7. Pack away all small, loose tools. Store in base cabinet drawers. Use heavy wire to double tie drawers shut. If drawers run side-by-side, or in column fashion, run steel pipe rod down through all handles. NOTE: New Orleans hotel painter used this in Katrina, and said it worked great.

 

8. Secure small, hand power tools. Tightly wrap and secure electric cords. Stuff tools into heavy storage cabinets (see no. 2), or into drawers (see no. 5). TIP: Wrap heavy-duty freezer bag around electric cord of each tool.

 

9. Pack away all large tools, including their power cords. Place in heavy storage cabinet, or empty 55-gallon steel paint drums. TIP: Hotel painter in South Florida secures a heavy-duty freezer bag a round cord of each power tool.

 

10. Place ladders flat on the floor along an inside wall.

 

11. Then, with extra manpower, push or place all heavy equipment on top of the ladders.

 

ALTERNATE TIP to NO. 8 and No. 9:

12. Lay ladders out, one side frame facing you. Then place against an inside wall.

13. Then, with help, push or place heavy equipment against ladders.

CAUTION: Please take special precautions with everything containing glass, very sharp parts, etc.

 

Bottom line: Safety is key. You want to minimize the risk of anyone getting injured (or killed) because of a container, glass, tool, ladder, etc. becoming air-bourne and aiming for a helpless human.

 

Hotel/facility painters and maintenance teammates face the threat of different natural disasters, based on the region of the country in which they work. Many of these events are similar. They feature elements such as very strong, whipping winds; blinding rains and flooding; and extreme temperatures.

 

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

PAINTSHOP: “You Have Just Been Awarded $5,000…”

You’ve been awarded $5,000 to spend on any painting projects of your choice. Where to start? How to decide? So many areas need work.

 

1. On what projects will that $5,000 reach the furthest? And, do the most good?

 

2. Is it really your decision to make? Or, are some members of management standing nearby hoping that you will select projects/areas that they want done, now that you – paintshop – have the budget to do them?

 

3. Do you need to make a list of your top five choices? Then get approval from management?

 

4. What kind of time frame are you looking at for spending down that money? Can you spread it out? Can you reserve some of it for a project later?

 

5. In that available time frame, which projects can be taken care of with minimal down time related to guest and staff ability to use the space or area.

 

These little tips may get your juices flowing now. Before that possible miracle gift falls in your lap.

 

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Every hotel or facility painter deserves some dream money for the paintshop.

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Thank you for checking in with “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik.  All rights reserved.

Painter’s View: How Management Can Hold Onto Their Good People

In 2015, I read this quote by an icon in the Hospitality industry:

 

“When a good person leaves, look to the leader for the reason.”

 

Many things can be done to hold onto a good worker. Things that are above board, fair and constructive; also cost-effective in the long haul.

 

 

TWENTY-ONE WAYS TO HOLD ONTO A GOOD WORKER

 

 

  1. Honor the work anniversary of each staff member.

 

  1. Level with him or her about why you can’t afford to issue a pay raise.

 

  1. Regularly, offer staff members discount and gift cards for items sold at the hotel. Make the amounts large enough.

 

  1. Show that you’re serious about his or her written suggestions and “observations.” Authorize the staff member to look into one or more of them.

 

  1. Encourage small “teams” of staffers to follow through on at least one idea, that is doable at the time.

 

  1. Monthly, host an informal coffee break with staffers. Select and rotate the day of the week.

 

  1. Find out about your workers. Who are they? What do they like about working at the hotel? What special challenges are they dealing with?

 

  1. About your staff members: Who aspires to advance with the hotel, or in the industry? Doing what? Who is taking classes, or wants to do so? Who is interested in on-the-job training?

 

  1. Who is interested in “doing something else” at the hotel? What? When? Are they willing to work into another position?

 

  1. Encourage participation in staff activities and events. See that scheduling is convenient, costs are very low or free, and time commitment will not interfere with their personal responsibilities.

 

  1. See that a variety of staff activities and events are offered. And, put in an appearance at as many of them as possible.

 

  1. Promote team member mentoring and support. Encourage staff members to cover each other’s backs.

 

  1. Maintain an “open door” policy. Encourage all supervisors and managers to do the same.

 

  1. Do little things to let staff members know you are there for them. That does not mean you have to agree with them on an issue, or they with you.

 

  1. See that your workers get what they need to do their regular jobs.

 

  1. Never put any staff member in the middle of a conflict between you and his/her supervisor, or another staff member.

 

  1. Never accuse any staff member of any wrongdoing unless you’re sure – and your proof is 100 percent reliable.

 

  1. Never remove a benefit or offer unless it is the only option. Then, be up front about it and make the change as promptly and smoothly as possible.

 

  1. Forget the favors. Just be fair and honest!

 

 

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Managers that cover the backs of all staff members will find their own backs covered, too.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s World: Painting Unusual Projects

What are the most unusual paint projects that you’ve ever done?

 

10 Unusual Paint Projects Worked on By Other Painters

 

  1. Exterior and interior of Doberman’s custom dog house
  2. Tennis equipment storage of retired athlete
  3. Children’s-sized 3-room playhouse
  4. Garage interior room for small antique tool collection
  5. Miniature apartment interior for training city dogs “how to live in an apartment”
  6. Built-in notions and supplies closets for professional designer and seamstress
  7. Huge storage closet for tech geek
  8. Children’s 2-level treehouse
  9. Agri-seed museum
  10. School’s double flagpole and connecting platform

 

10 Unusual Paint Projects that I have Worked On

 

  1. Sandblasting and spraying vinyl coating on structural steel frame for train scale
  2. Painted geometric graphics in fluorescent colors in day care center
  3. Applied genuine grasscloth wallcovering to entire room – ceiling, walls, doors
  4. Painted piping and talk system that was being shipped to China
  5. Sandblasted and painted semi-tractor wrecker
  6. Stained woodwork for molded panel ceiling
  7. Painted church dome with Metallic Gold
  8. Sandblasted and epoxy-painted Olympic-sized swimming pool
  9. Applied foil wallpaper to large ceiling
  10. Brush and rolled steel tub frames for Wild West display

 

Probably, my father’s most unusual painting project was the interior of an underground bomb shelter. In particular, he painted the vertical wood panels inserted into the walls of the pre-cast 12-feet by 18 feet vault thick steel shell. The agri-businessman’s wife refused to even step in the security structure unless it “looked inviting and homey.”

 

Unusual painting projects tend to stretch our creativity, agility and patience. They also give us the opportunity to have lots of fun. To use colors in exciting, unexpected ways. To reach into our greater selves as craftspersons and artisans.

 

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Unusual painting projects can open the door to new, specialty career opportunities.

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Thank you for including “Painting with Bob” in your busy day.

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: How to Achieve a Superior High Gloss Finish

First of all, starting out with a smooth surface is essential. With a rough surface, you will have to add exceedingly more hours of labor to even reach a starting point.

 

Metal, fiberglass or hardwoods are the substrates of choice when considering an ultra smooth surface.

 

In this instance, I will use metal as the example. No matter what the situation, the proper procedure in achieving a gloss finish includes:

 

  1. Initial metal preparation – Acid etch surface, orbital sand with #80 grit sandpaper.

 

  1. Dry and wipe surface clean with lacquer thinner, then use tack cloth.

 

  1. Using an HVLP spray system, apply multiple thin coats of high solids epoxy primer or acrylic lacquer. Let dry thoroughly. Orbital sand between coats with #400 sandpaper; then, wet sand with #600 sandpaper.

 

  1. Apply urethane sealer using two thin coats. When dry, wet sand using #600 sandpaper.

 

  1. Apply urethane basecoat using three thin coats with a 60% overlap in spray pattern.

 

  1. After two to four hours of drying, color sand using #600, then, #800 sandpaper. Wash surface with soap and water. Rinse with warm water, and let dry.

 

  1. Reapply urethane basecoat using three thin coats.

 

  1. After drying time, wet sand with #800 grit sandpaper. Wash and rinse surface. Dry and tack cloth.

 

  1. Apply multiple thin coats of urethane clear coat. Let dry.

 

  1. Wet sand with #1000 or #1200 grit sandpaper. Rinse with warm water. Let dry.

 

  1. Apply final clear coat. Let dry.

 

After all that time and preparation, you should be able to see your face in all that shine. What is paramount in order to reach such a high level of finish is a person’s skill at spray painting. No beginner can ever hope to achieve such a finish.

 

Typically, there are five elements involved which you must have:

 

  1. A well seasoned professional with comprehensive knowledge of all the modern finishes.
  2. A well equipped spray booth with positive flow ventilation.
  3. A client who is willing to pay for the best, and has patience.
  4. A preparation team who is dedicated to producing the finest finish imaginable.
  5. All those involved should have a basic knowledge of OEM and aftermarket paint material and solvent compatabilities.

 

Producing a fine finish at a hotel, on a client site, or in your home can be accomplished. You do not have to follow all of the rules above. Just keep the following ideas in mind:

 

First, wet sand or dry sand in decreasing grits #220-#320-#400.

Next, make sure that, after sanding, the surface is tack clothed. If you do not, you will have debris in the finished paint job.

Third, always apply thin multiple coats. With heavy coats, you may have runs, sags, and cracking. You absolutely want to avoid this.

Final step, set up a spray booth.

 

Also, provide adequate ventilation by (a) using fans, and (b) wet the floor to keep dust at a minimum.

 

And, if you are interested in wood finishing, some of the same methods can be used. Just keep the surface dry and dust free until completed.

 

A superior finish is all about knowledge and talent. It is about looking at such a finish and wondering, “Who could have done this? It’s magnificent!”

 

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A superior high gloss finish starts with a super skilled finisher.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s View: Modifying Your Hotel’s Color Scheme

Supposedly, residential painters possess the greatest creative latitude in using color. Their palette is color wheel sized.

Hotel and facility painters tend to be confined to the master color scheme established for the property. Then, specific surfaces, areas and amenities on the property.

That said, they can expand that palette. They can give the property, and people, a huge boost!

 

My suggestion? Start on the right foot.

1. Be certain that you have identified the exact color scheme currently approved by the owners.

2. Check out where what colors are used.
Example: Sherwin-Williams Yellow crème. Front road entrance and lobby/office building.
Example: S-W Chinese Red. Front entrance and lobby building fascia.
Example: S-W Deep Mint Green. Exteriors of guest buildings.
Example: S-W Bright Gold. Exterior doors of guest rooms.

3. Confirm with the owners their preferences and limitations for making color use changes.
Q. What colors in that color scheme can be modified?
Q. What new tints, hues and/or shades are acceptable?
Q. On which surfaces and areas can what specific new colors be applied?

TIP: Get sample color swatches approved in advance. In writing!

 

TEN TIPS FOR MODIFYING COLOR SCHEMES

1. Building exterior fascia and trim. Be consistent.
Example: If the front lobby building is trimmed in S-W Chinese Red, then trim all buidings on the property in the same color hue. The finish may need to be varied, depending on the surface.

2. Option: If color scheme features, say, six colors, use all six at front entrance area. Then, paint the fascia and trim on each building in one, or different hue from color scheme palette.

3. Then, paint other exterior surfaces on or near respective building in that hue.

4. Select one color from the color scheme. Mix two-to-three tints closely related to that color. Choose two-to-three types of surfaces and areas around the property to paint in those different tints.
Example: Park benches, signage frames, litter collection boxes. Paint in S-W Medium Mint Green, one of the new tints.

5. Select two colors from interior color scheme. Mix two-to-five tints closely related to those colors. Then, choose two-to-five types of surfaces/areas to paint in those new tints.

6. Choose two different tints from the same new one above. Paint two areas in the office area in those tints to liven up the workspace.

7. Choose the mid-level tint from that 2-5 that you mixed already. Create accent wall in sales director’s office. Paint darker tint on bottom half of the wall. Then, tint that color two levels lighter. Use that color to apply decorative finish – eg. vertical stripe – to upper half of wall.
Added touch: Paint a long narrow section of wainscoting/trim a darker tint of same color. And install it mid-point horizontally.

8. For the G.M’s office, use the darkest tint that you mixed. Create an accent wall by applying decorative finish on entire wall.

9. In main hallway to a restaurant, brush on a light tint of one of the lobby colors from the color scheme. Added touch: Paint wainscoting/trim section in same tint, or two shades darker.

10. Fitness room. Paint three-foot wide vertical stripe on both entry walls. Use one of lighter colors from master color scheme.

The idea is to build on the color scheme that you already have in place. Wherever possible, you want to extend and accentuate that theme. You want to unify the overall aesthetic appearance of painted and decorated elements on the property.

And, ultimately, you want to strengthen and solidify the guests, and teammates, overall perception and connection to your hotel.

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A painter’s role includes the enhancement of what’s already there!
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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s View: Working a Holiday Shift

Working a holiday shift has its rewards. Take Labor Day at a hotel or hospital.

 

  1. The overall mood of the staff is more upbeat, spontaneous and relaxed.
  2. Guests or patients are feeling upbeat and sociable, even to staff.
  3. Fewer members of management may be around to interrupt your work.
  4. Supervisors tend to move in slower gear, and accept the same from team members.
  5. The painter’s tasks and work orders can often be completed in minimal time.
  6. Management demands cause less stress.
  7. The overall atmosphere around the property is lighter, even enjoyable.
  8. The dining menus offer more festive, fun choices – even in the staff/employee cafeteria.
  9. Lunch breaks may be a little longer if the workload is light – and relatively routine.
  10. More opportunities may come along to chat with teammates – in your own and other departments.
  11. Extra treats, from the chef, may be available for free. Particularly, if he and his kitchen helpers have been cooking for a big event at the hotel.
  12. Clocking out may be a little later than usual; but the reason is usually worth it.
  13. Guests or patients like the chance to visit with you a few minutes.

 

 

Eight Tips for Enjoying that Holiday Work Shift

 

  1. In advance: Pick a painting project you can easily leave and return to throughout the day.
  2. Schedule to eat lunch with one or more teammates, and share the holiday spirit.
  3. Share your morning and afternoon breaks with any fellow staff member that’s nearby.
  4. Help a teammate handle a work order that is clearly a pain in the grain.
  5. Look alive! Lend a hand when you see a coworker struggling with a large arm load of stuff, or trying to move a piece of furniture or equipment.
  6. Treat your supervisor on duty to a soda, coffee, or snack.
  7. Say more than a “hello” to guests or patients located in your general work area.
  8. Volunteer to help a teammate or supervisor with a task or work order so everyone in your department can leave on schedule.

 

Turn your holiday work shift into an experience you wouldn’t mind repeating. And, help others to feel the same.

 

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Your hotel’s or hospital’s paintshop doesn’t close just because it’s a legal holiday.

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Thank you, holiday shift painters, for staying on the job.

 

And thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painters at Work: In Hours, Days, Weeks, Months, Year

How much time do you spend using specific skills and abilities?

A group of 150 painters completed a detailed questionnaire to determine how painters work in the 21st century. It was part of a research project.

 
Section I: Computation of amount of time that we actually work.  

Example:

1. Day-to-week: 8 hours/day x 5 days = 40 hours/1 week

2. Weeks-to-month: 40 hours/1 week x 4 weeks = 160 hours/1 month

3. Months-to-year: 160 hours/1 month x 11 months = 1760 hours/11 months

4. ADD: 40 hours x 2 weeks = 80 hours/ ½ month

5. Approximate Total Hours = 1840 hours/ 11 ½ months (excludes 80 hrs./vacation time).

 

Section II: Computation of how we spend our time, based on following information:

 

1. Paint skills and abilities used alone;

2. Paint skills and abilities in combination/simultaneously;

3. Paint movements and positions used alone;

4. Paint movements and positions used in combination/simultaneously;

5. Paint tools and equipment used alone;

6. Paint tools and equipment used in combination/simultaneously.

 

COMPUTATIONS FOR TEN OF THE QUESTIONS.

 

Note: All painters checked the box beside:  “My figures/estimates are on the low side.”

 

1. How many hours do you hold a paint brush?

A. 6 hrs./day x 5 days = 30 hrs./1 week

B. 30 hrs/1 wk. x 4 wks. = 120 hrs./1 month

C. 120 hrs/1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1320 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 30 hrs x 2 wks. = 60 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1380 hrs./11 ½ months

 

2. How many hours do you use a spray gun?

A. 6.5 hrs./day x 5 days = 32.5 hrs./1 week

B. 32.5 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 130 hrs./1 month

C. 130 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1430 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 32.5 hrs./1 wk. x 2 wks. = 65 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1495 hrs./11 ½ months

 

3. How many hours do you stand?

A. 7 hrs./day x 5 days = 35 hrs./1 week

B. 35 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 140 hrs./1 month

C. 140 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1540 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 35 hrs. x 2 wks. = 70 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1610 hrs./11 ½ months.

 

4. How many hours do you carry?

A. 3 hrs./day x 5 days = 15 hrs./1 week

B. 15 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 60 hrs./1 month

C. 60 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 660 hrs./11 months

D. Add: 15 hrs. x 2 wks. = 30 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 690 hrs./ 11 ½ months

 

5. How many hours do you lift?*

A. 3 hrs./day x 5 days = 15 hrs./1 week

B. 15 hrs. wk. x 4 wks. = 60 hrs./1 month

C. 60 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 660 hrs./11 months

D. Add: 15 hrs. x 2 wks. = 30 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 690 hrs./ 11 ½ months

* Does not show the number of times painter lifts/carries combination of cans, buckets, tools, etc.

 

6. How many hours do you walk and/or step?

A. 5 hrs./day x 5 days = 25 hrs./1 week

B. 25 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 100 hrs./1 month

C. 100 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1100 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 25 hrs. x 2 wks. = 50 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1150 hrs./ 11 ½ months

 

7. How many hours do you climb?

A. 5 hrs./day x 5 days = 25 hrs./1 week

B. 25 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 100 hrs./1 month

C. 100 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1100 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 25 hrs. x 2 wks. = 50 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1150 hrs./ 11 ½ months

 

8. How many hours do you bend, kneel and/or crouch?

A. 3 hrs./day x 5 days = 15 hrs./1 week

B. 15 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 60 hrs./1 month

C. 60 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 660 hrs./ 11 months

D. ADD: 15 hrs. x 2 wks. = 30 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 690 hrs./ 11 ½ months

 

9. How much weight do you lift?  * Does not include weight of container

A. Paint (gal) = 122 fl. ounces/7.6 lbs.

B. Paint (qt.) =   31 fl. ounces/1.94 lbs.

C. Paint (5 gal) = 620 fl. ounces/38/.7 lbs.

D. Ladder (6 ft./wood) =

E. Ladder (6 ft./alum.) =

F. Ladder (12 ft. extension/alum) =

G. Tool kit = 15 lbs.
* Does not show number of times painter is lifting/carrying combination of product cans, tools, and equipment at same time.

Examples:

A. 2 gal paint = 15.2 lbs.

B. 1 gal paint (7.6 lbs.) + 1 ladder/6 ft. aluminum (23.8 lbs.) = 31.4 lbs.

C. 1-5 gal. paint (38.8 lbs.) + 1 ladder 12-ft aluminum (69 lbs.) = 107.8 lbs.

D. 1-5 gal. paint (38.8 lbs.) + 1 spray gun + system (23.5 lbs.) = 63.9 lbs.

E. 1-gal paint (7.6 lbs.) + 1 tool (15 lbs.) = 21.6 lbs.

 

10. How many hours do you match paint colors to painted surfaces?

A. 0.5 hrs./day x 5 days = 2.5 hrs./1 week

B. 2.5 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 10 hrs./1 month

C. 10 hrs./1 mo. x 11 months = 110 hrs./ 11 months

D. ADD: 2.5 hrs./1 wk. x 2 wks. = 5 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 115 hrs./11 ½ months

 

Section II included the following questions that required painters to calculate their time:

 

11. How many hours do you prepare surfaces? Ex: A. Filling/caulking, B. Sanding, C. Patching, D. Priming

12. How many hours do you spend cleaning preparation and painting tools?

13. How many hours do you repair painting tools and equipment?

14. How many hours do you use a computer?

15. How many hours do you use a mobile communication device?

16. How many hours do you use a calculator, or other computation device/software program? 

 

Section III required the painters to identify the skills/abilities and tasks they used simultaneously. Example: Painting – use brush – carry, then stand on ladder – carry 1 gallon of paint.

 

Then, painters needed to compute how much time they performed/used/did each part within that combination.

 

How will this data be used? Why is it important? Here’s a capsule view:

 

1. Federal and state agencies can determine how actual job descriptions for specific occupations have changed.

2. Wage/pay scale experts can identify changes in calculating actual task-to-time rates.

3. Educational, vocational and technical program developers determine real-world/real-time curricular needs of current and future workers.

4. Recruitment and employment specialists identify how to market and fill positions, based on a three-to-five year worker retention scale.

5. Industry manufacturers of products, materials, supplies, tools, equipment, etc. can better identify the needs of the specific types persons that will be using their products.

6. Health industry providers determine newer problem areas in symptomology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis; also project industry needs in patient care.

 

This particular research  project is still being conducted. Is it the type of project in which the average painter should participate? ABSOLUTELY!

 

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Build up your own profession, craft or trade – especially for the next generation!

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s World: Memory in the Workplace and Workspace

No one remembers everything. Only occasionally, do we remember all that we set out to do.

 

The brain is an information highway, full of stop signs and high speed passing lanes.

 

At leisure: The brain is under minimal stress.

 

At work: The brain is subjected to and bombarded with multiple assignments and procedures, throughout the day. And, each tests the brain’s capacity to remember.

 

Relying on your memory to help you complete tasks at work is selective at best. Say that you have determined the steps in doing something. When the time comes, you may be able to remember only certain things – and will forget other things.

 

TIPS FOR PRESERVING AND MAXIMIZING YOUR MEMORY AT WORK

 

1. Create mental cues.

TIP: Use key imagery hints related to what you want to remember.

TIP: Form associations. Eg. To file a report, set a time and place.

 

2. Make it noteworthy.

TIP: Write yourself a note to remind yourself. And, keep it very handy!

 

3. Involve others.

TIP: Several persons remembering the same thing is insurance that the information or task will not be forgotten. Note: This is team playing, first class!

 

4. At work station.

TIP: Create duty/memory board. If it’s critical, write in big letters. And, vary your colors.

 

5. Messaging.

TIP: Place notes at strategic spots where you will see them. More is better.

 

6. Prioritize.

Example: When your day begins, write a brief description of your duties, in order of importance or scheduling priority.

TIP: The most essential items always go at the top of the list.

 

7. Minimize.

Example: Distractions can undo your working and short-term memories.

Your thoughts become fragmented, and you are less likely to finish what you start. You are much less likely to do it well.

TIP: When at work, FOCUS.

 

 

When trying to remember? Keep your mental list short, and your notebook list detailed.

 

Hope your painting world is working for you! Thank you, everyone, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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