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Paint Shop 2: Policies and Guidelines That Will Work

There’s one way to operate a hotel or facility paint shop. That is with a set of easy-to-follow policies and guidelines (vs. rules) that fit the engineering department – and the organization.

The shop size can total one wall with a few shelves, a large room with a separate workshop area, or an entire small building, or shed. The rules will be the same, basically.

 

Some PAINT SHOP basics: JUST DO IT!

 

JUST DO IT: Keep shop neat. Picked up. Swept up.

JUST DO IT: Keep shop floor clean, and clear of parts, tools; spills, piles of anything, garbage.

JUST DO IT: Keep workshop clean, swept up and ready for next project.

JUST DO IT: Put things away – and in their proper places – when you’re finished with them.

DON’T DO IT: No “borrowing” of paint shop/engineering/company property for personal use.

DON’T DO IT: No “loaning” or “giving” of paint shop/engineering property to other departments – unless your supervisor authorizes. TIP: Get a written authorization.

 

1. Set up a Sign-out and Sign-in system for all paint shop property.

 

2. Put up a Paint Shop bulletin board. Post inventory list, requisition list, FYIs, cartoons, etc. TIP: And, keep those lists updated!

 

3. Tightly close all cans, bottles, tubes, boxes, bags, containers, etc.

 

4. Thoroughly clean all tools before storing back on the shelf, in the cupboard, in kiosk, etc.

 

5. Clean equipment; and make a note of any repairs needed, before returning to its proper storage area(s).

 

A. Flush out spray gun spray lines. Clean nozzles, tips, hoses, product containers, etc.

B. Soak and clean spray guns to prevent sticking, clogging, damage to mechanisms.

C. Empty out any unused product from container; place in storage container for recycling – eg. paint, polyurethane, chemical treatment.

D. Wash out each container with appropriate cleaning agent. Let dry.

 

6. Do basic repairs and maintenance on tools and equipment before storing.

 

7. Store products and materials appropriately and safely. Follow MSDS, UBC, HAZMAT, EPA codes.

 

A. All cans, spray cans, bottles, boxes, tubs: Upright.

B. Wallcovering rolls, boxes: Upright.All tubes – eg. paint, tinting.

 

8. Store all tools and equipment in a safe manner.

 

A. Brushes: Bristles up (no cover); bristles upright (sturdy cover); bristles down (in “wet-storage” brush container).

B. Roller covers: on end, to maintain nap integrity.

C. Electrical tools: Turn to “OFF” position before re-shelving, re-storing.

D. Mechanical tools: Close/fold up handles and levers before re-shelving or re-storing.

E. Saw blades, sharp edges: Remove, retract, or cover. Store in visible spot of toolbox/cabinet.

F. Sharp objects, scissors: Close up; place with handles up, or facing YOU.

G. Razor blades: Retract into holders/handles; or store individually in closed, marked box.

 

9. Store nuts, bolts, washers, screws, etc. in plastic organizer boxes – or small plastic/metal containers.

 

10. Store small tools in divided tool chest, toolbox, small carry-all, unbreakable containers.

 

11. Store like products together, like materials together, like tools together, etc.

 

12. Store all products, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment in dry, safe places.

 

13. Keep records of inventory use, loss, breakage, disrepair, “retirement,” etc.

 

14. Regularly, post a list of items that (a) are running low, (b) need to be requisitioned – and when, (c) need to be RUSH ordered, (d) are no longer used or kept in stock.

 

15. Post in visible spot a running list of your requisitioned items. Keep track of requisition and order status. Display date of order.

 

16. Requisition basic supplies before you get low. Keep checking with supervisor and/or purchasing manager about their order and delivery status.

 

17. Be cost-conscious and budget-time aware in selecting and ordering products, materials, supplies, new tools, etc.

 

18. Know which products, materials, supplies, etc. cannot be compromised – quality and durability versus cost.

 

19. Keep accurate records. Neat, complete, easy-to-understand, easy-to-use.

 

20. Discard products and materials that are no longer usable – dried up, discolored, faded, damaged (mold, mildew, water, sun); frayed, bug-infested.

 

** TIP: Fill partially full containers of paint, stain, varnish, etc. with sand, or other absorbent.

 

21. Discard products, materials, supplies, etc. that do not meet product standards and safety codes. WHY: Regulators and inspectors are watching. Too, people can get very ill.

 

22. Promptly discard damaged or broken tools and equipment that cannot be repaired – and are too dangerous to use in present condition. WHY: FIRE and SAFETY hazards.

 

23. Discard used rags, paper towels, etc. – especially those with strong odors, fumes, residue.

** TIP: Soak rags in soapy water to neutralize combustibility or flammability.

 

24. Report problems promptly to your supervisor, and to teammates. Keep everyone informed!

 

25. Promptly report losses, damages, and thefts of products, materials, supplies, tools, equipment.

WHY: It’s company policy! Also, some items may need to be replaced a.s.a.p.

 

Comply with the safety rules on an ongoing basis. It’s the best way to prevent accidents in your paint shop.

Establish policies and guidelines that are DO-ABLE.  Establishing that policy and practice helps all of your teammates – especially engineering/facility – keep the paint shop looking good, and working great! For everyone!

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Thank you for visiting “Painting  with Bob.”

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Hotel Engineering Team Training – Pilot Project 2015

In August of 2014, a large hotel chain conducted a three-day run-through of a skyp training program that will activate in 2015. The unique, standardized program is geared toward the chain’s facilities services’ team members. The company’s goal: Establish, standardize and unify practices and operations in its engineering departments throughout the chain.

The double goal for team members is specific: preparedness for change, and job security. Each worker – painter, maintenance tech, engineering tech, HVAC technician, etc. – will be able to (1) check-mate his or her basic techniques and skills, (2) update capabilities, and (3) learn to use newer and/or better methods, products, materials, tools, equipment, and systems.

The program was developed by experienced craftspersons in construction, property maintenance, and power systems operations. It features multi-disciplinary, hands-on workshops in painting, maintenance, HVAC, electrical, mechanical, carpentry, plumbing, power plant, groundskeeping.

Each session will be skyped, on a rotational basis, into each property’s secured, employees-only telecom system. Each will be offered three days a week, at different times – again within forty-five days. This flexible feature tries to accommodate for unexpected departmental work surges, emergency situations and worker demands.

Participation is required. Each team member takes every workshop in his or her core job description. In addition, each person takes at least one workshop in every other job area in the department. And, every team member takes each workshop during his or her work shift.

 

Basically, here’s how it will work…

 

  1. A team member signs up for each training session two-to-three weeks in advance.
  2. A team member is encouraged to take all training sessions in his/her area before taking others.
  3. A team member can sign up, in advance, for the entire series of workshops in his core area.
  4. A team member reserves the option to take any other session before completing core program. 5. Class “size” is limited to two team members at a time.
  5. Each workshop runs thirty minutes.

Each workshop will follow a similar format…

 

  1. Each engineering department site is set up, in advance, for the next scheduled workshop.
  2. At his or her respective site, each team member “student” is provided with the same products, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment being used by the trade craftsperson and instructor.
  3. Each team member uses the technique, or performs the task, that’s being demonstrated by the craftsperson/instructor.
  4. Every team member can e-mail or text questions and comments to that workshop’s instructor after each session, or at a later time or date.
  5. A team member completes each workshop by logging onto his or her online registration page.
  6. After completion, a team member can access the DVD-version of each workshop – at any time, at work.
  7. All products, materials, supplies, and tools used at a specific hotel site become part of that engineering department’s inventory – and can be used by team members in the future.

The training program draws on the filmed systems used for years by employer and franchise giants in nearly every industry. A painter friend works for the hotel chain, and attended the three-day run-through in August. He described the five-minute, on-line/mobile app critique at the end of each workshop.

“The questions were very specific. No ‘strongly agree to strongly disagree’ rating system. No multiple choices… Clearly the program’s developers – and the hotel people – wanted honest feedback. Input they could use to make the training even more helpful to engineering people.”

His enthusiastic attitude about the required program reminded me of something:

Every facility painter – every painterthat I know is always learning new things. In fact, they look for new things to learn. And, they look for ways both to improve and to upgrade what they already know. That’s what makes every one of them stand out from the crowd!

 

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“The top quality paintbrush can be improved upon only so much. The painter that puts that brush to work is always looking for – and seeing – room for improvement.”  RDH

 

Paint Shop I: Organizing and Storing, Part 1: Inventory Your Inventory

I learned young about paint shop operations. Part of my first job, as an apprentice painter, was keeping the paint shops – buildings – clean, inventory organized, and workshop spaces ready to use. (We did a tremendous volume of shop work: sandblasting, painting, finishing, etc.)

For a small painting contractor business, that may have been an easy job. For a major, and still growing, commercial and industrial contractor business, it meant a lot of steady work!

Every paint shop is organized differently. How well it works depends on the painter responsible for its operations. Also, it depends on how well it works for the rest of the team. Team members in the engineering or facility services department; also team members in the other departments within the organization.

When the painter responsible for the paint shop is not around, do enough people in the department know how to handle things? Painting-wise? Is everything being taken care of?

What follows is a two-section tutorial on Paint Shop Operations. Paint Shop I, starting here, covers organizing and storing. It’s divided into four parts: (1) inventory your inventory; (2) creating a place for everything; (3) putting and keeping everything in its place; and, (4) maintaining inventory lists.

 

1: Inventory your shop’s inventory – by category and subcategory.

—What do you have – types, colors, quantities, general condition?

 

A. Products/Materials:

(1) Paint – Latexes, epoxies, oils – Total no. of gallons, according to paint type, color.

(2) Finishes – Stains, varnishes, urethanes, shellac

(3) Coatings – Rust/corrosion prevention, anti-fouling, elastomeric, chemical-resistant, UV protective, waterproofing, heat-resistant

(4) Wallcoverings – Papers, vinyls, foils, flocks, textures, patterns, grasscloths; borders, murals

 

B. Preparation/Supplies:

(1) Sandpapers – What grades; total number of sheets in each grade

(2) Caulking tubes – Types (eg. for kitchen/bath, exterior); total number of each type

(3) Solvents – 1 gal. each of most used products: mineral spirits, lacquer thinners, denatured alcohol

(4) Paint tint kit – Universal tints

 

C. Work area supplies:

(1) Dropcloths – At least 3 – 4 ft. by 15 ft. for clean interior use; 2 – 4 ft. by 15 ft. for

exterior use; 2 – 16 ft. by 20 ft. for wide covering.

(2) Sheeting – 1 roll 20 ft. by 100 ft. plastic; 3+ smaller rolls

(3) Buckets, sponges – 1/2 gal., 1 gal., 2 gal., 5 gal; natural sea sponges (assorted sizes, thicknesses)

(4) Masking paper, masking tapes – 1 dozen each ¾-to 1 ½ inch masking tape.

 

D. Tools:

(1) Brushes – Assortment nylon or China bristle: 1-in., 2-in., 2 ½-in., 3-in., 4-in

(2) Rollers, roller covers – Assortment 3-in. to 12-in. rollers; ¼-in. to 1/1/2-in. naps.

(3) Paint tray, paint screen

(4) Broad knives, level, straight-edge

(5) Basic tool kit: Hammer, screwdrivers, wrench, pliers, clamps, etc.

 

E. Equipment:

(1) Spray guns, hose – Airless sprayer greater than ½ gal. perminate capacity

(2) Compressor – Greater than 6 OFM for spray painting

(3) Ladders – 1+ 24-ft. extension, 16-ft. stepladder, 5-ft. platform aluminum ladder

(4) Pressure washer – Greater than 2000 psi

(5) Garden sprayer system

 

F. Protective gear and Safety items:

(1) Boxes/ packages of disposable gloves, breathing masks

(2) Organic vapor respirator, also spare cartridges; dust mask supply, safety glasses

(3) Disposable plastic suits, hats, shoe coverings, vinyl/rubber gloves

(4) Signs: WET PAINT, CAUTION, KEEP OFF, Caution Tape

 

G. Cleaning/Clean-up Supplies:

(1) Sponges, bags of rags, buckets (2-qt. plastic), floor mops

(2) Glass/mirror cleaner, spot remover

(3) Standard trash bags, heavy duty trash bags; re-sealable plastic bags (eg. for storing hardware, switch plates)

(4) Small portable vacuum cleaner, shop vacuum; push brooms, large dustpans; dusting brushes, deck brush w/extension.

 

H. Vehicle/Golf Cart Maintenance:

(1) Car wax, upholstery cleaner

(2) Oil, tire gauge, tire pump

(3) Battery charger

(4) Small portable vacuum, combo mini-broom/dustpan

 

I. Recordkeeping, Writing, Presentations:

(1) Software programs – Excel, Outlook/Express, Word, PowerPoint, Quickbooks

(2) Printable forms and worksheets on internet

(3) Journals, ledgers, and other systems available from office supply –in-store, on-line.

 

Your Paint Shop inventory pertains to much more than a few cans of paint in your standard, frequently-used colors. It pertains to everything that you and every person in your department may need to perform painting-related tasks, work orders, projects, etc.

 

PAINT SHOP MANAGER TIP: You need to know what you have on-hand. You need to know what you’re supposed to keep on-hand. You need to know what you need to get on-hand. To be ready to go! Or, as close to that point as possible. At all times.

 

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Organize your Paint Shop. It saves lots of time. It minimizes mistakes, frustration and accidents. It cuts costs like you wouldn’t believe!

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

What to Carry on Your Painter’s Golf Cart

 golfcarts   In July, a painter with a four-star hotel and resort e-mailed me about his recently inherited golf cart. He’d just relocated from the East coast.

“Two questions: What are the must-haves, good-to-haves, etc. to carry on my cart? What should I carry to be ready for anything? With the larger property and greater flexibility and autonomy in this job comes more time management challenges.”

Golf carts are the standard mode of transportation and conveyance for hotel and other facilities’ painters, as well as engineering techs. They’re compact, and a real back saver and life saver.

They’re a necessity for (1) getting around the property fast, (2) responding promptly and efficiently to calls, (3) hauling materials, supplies and tools, (4) equipping oneself for completing scheduled and emergency tasks and projects, and, (5) performing those “other duties as needed.”

What things do you need to keep on your golf cart?                                     

1. The 24/7 basics

A. Products and materials: Joint compound mix, caulking, light-weight spackling, paint, texture patch, interior/exterior paint for touch-up work.

B. Supplies: No. 120 and No. 220 sandpaper, masking tape (3/8-inch, 1-inch, 1 ½-inch), masking paper, steel wool, “WET PAINT” signs, small bag of clean rags; dropcloths (clean), buckets.

C. Tools: Drywall pan, 6-inch knife, 10-inch knife, multi-sized screwdrivers, portable drill, drywall hand saw, caulking gun, assorted paint brushes and roller covers, utility knife, roller frame and screen, roller extension poles, wire brush, paint strainer.

D. Protective gear: Safety glasses, disposable bodysuits, gloves, rubber gloves, respirator, dust masks.

E. Disposal/garbage things: Plastic bags, rolls of paper towels.

2. Add: Painting-related work order essentials

A. Spray cans of fast drying primer (white, gray), latex caulking, joint compound

B. Small notebook

3. Add: Painting project essentials

A. Roll of plastic, garbage container, circulating fan, “CAUTION” Tape.

4. Add: Special painting and decorating project essentials

A. Sponges, cheese cloth, tack cloths, plastic wrap, masking tape

B. Glazing liquid, linseed oil, paint thinner, various faux finishing brushes

5. Add: Handy-to-have along items

A. Masking machine, heat gun, wallpaper steamer

B. Broom and dustpan, vacuum cleaner (portable, battery-operated)

6. Add: Engineering and maintenance tech basic supplies

A. Replacement parts for bathtub, sinks, electrical, light bulbs

B. Paint to touch up walls where necessary, caulking for tubs, sinks and counter-tops

C. Hammer, wrench, pliers, 2-4 clamps, sealant glue

D. Level, tape measure, picture hanging clips/fasteners

 7. Add: Containers, holders, etc. to keep things organized

A. Large portable tool container

B. Plastic tray (s) for small parts

Okay! What things should NOT be carried around on your work golf cart?

1.  Air compressor, pressure washer

2.  Anything that protrudes out from cart’s side or back, creating safety issue

3.  CAUTION: Hazardous materials should be removed from your cart as quickly as possible. Never leave them on the cart, when it is left unattended, or overnight.

TIPS FOR KEEPING YOUR GOLF CART CLEAN, AND LOOKING FINE!

1. Once a week

. Wash your golf cart and wipe dry with a clean, soft rag.

. Wipe down all other areas to keep them looking clean.

. Clean the windshield – as often as needed. Include windows, if cart is enclosed.

. Vacuum the floor, back areas, etc.

. Straighten out your supply and tool areas, while you’re at it.

. As a final touch, give the steering wheel and column, dashboard, etc. a good cleaning with a couple of disinfecting wipes.

2. Once a month, or more often

. Clean the seat upholstery. Spray on all-purpose auto upholstery product, or mixture of 1 part mild vinegar to 2-3 parts water. Wipe dry.

. Wipe down all surfaces.

3. Every six months

. Apply a coat of car/truck wax on metal surfaces. Buff out with soft rag/cloth.

. Apply a similar wax on plastic areas, such as the canopy.

A FEW GOLF CART SAFETY SUGGESTIONS…

1. Make sure the batteries are fully charged every day.

2. Check the tires for proper inflation at least once a week.

3. Always carry the ignition key with you. Never leave it in the cart.

4. Always park your loaded up cart as close as possible to your working area.

* CAUTION:  An unattended golf cart can be an “inviting enticement.”

CLOSING TIP:

What you carry on your cart depends a lot on your listed job description. Also, it depends on the other things that you may be responsible for handling. It depends on the size of the property. And, it depends on how much running you want to do – back and forth between your paint shop and the locations on your “to-do” list for the day or week.

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Enjoy your day!  Enjoy your life! And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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