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Posts tagged ‘materials’

Painting It: Estimating Paint Quantity and Cost

 

In the process of estimating a project, always include the amount of each paint product you will need to use. That means: Number of pints, quarts, gallons, and five-gallon quantities.

 

When the project is small and requires only one type of material, priced at under ten dollars, there’s rarely a problem. It becomes more complicated when you have an entire house, or a commercial building, to paint.

 

When costs enter the picture, accuracy and precision are the rule of thumb. It is possible to bid a job, receive it and later find that you have underbid the work. Let’s say by twenty gallons, and at a cost of $340.00.

 

There’s no problem if your total estimate is in the thousands. But, if the bid is $700.00, then you have just lost 50% of the gross payment. Add those mistakes add up big time over the course of a year. You will barely realize a profit.

 

A permanent solution so you don’t underbid – unintentionally.

 

1. Estimate (accurately) the total square feet and linear feet of the project.

A. Square feet: Measure length and height of longest and adjacent wall. Multiply.

B. Linear feet: Measure length of longest wall/area. Multiply by number of walls.

 

2. Establish a spreadsheet on the various products by name, and cost per unit.

A. For each product, list the manufacturer’s color name and code number.

B. Specify the manufacturer for each product you intend on using.

 

3. Calculate a base figure for sales tax for all quantity units.

 

4. Establish a spreadsheet detailing specific surface coverage for each material.

 

5. Design a chart comparing surface texture with volume of material used.

 

6. Figure in a transportation charge for pickup and delivery of supplies.

 

General Rules of Thumb – based on quality of product you choose.

 

1. Average gallon of latex paint covers = 400 sq. ft. at cost of $9.00 – $21.00.

2. Average bedroom = 1.5 gallons of paint.

3. Clear coating a wood door = 1 quart of finish at cost of $12.00 – $15.00.

4. Semi-gloss latex for bathroom ceiling = ½ gallon at cost of $6.00 – $9.00.

5. Latex paint for 2500 sq. ft. house = 7 gallons at cost of $120.00 – $160.00.

6. Oil stain 10 Oak doors = 1 gallon at cost of $22.00 – $30.00.

 

Estimating paint product quantity and cost takes time. It deserves your full attention. Even the top estimators –eg. in construction, or engineering/facilities management – know the tradeoffs for doing their job right. Every time.

 

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Estimate each time as though your job depends on your accuracy.

Probably, it does. And, so do the jobs of others!

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Enjoy your New Year. And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paint Shop I: Organizing and Storing, Part 3 and 4: Keeping Things in Place, Maintaining Inventory List

“Inventorying” your paint shop inventory is one thing. Creating – gridding out – spaces/places for everything is another challenge – and opportunity. Putting and keeping your inventory in its place is a third challenge.

Maintaining your paint shop inventory can be a major challenge. An ongoing one, in fact. Especially, if your budget is constantly in the “cutback” mode.

Take heart, fellow painters! Especially if you’re responsible for paint shop operations. Sooner or later, you will get the support you need to run your shop right. So that it can benefit the organization, and the people it’s meant to serve.

 

3. Putting and Keeping Everything in Its Place. Keep related items together.

 

A. Label each can, container, box, package before placing it on a shelf, in a cupboard, etc.

(1) Tape appropriate COLOR CHIP on the lid and front of every can of paint, stain, varnish, etc.

(2) On OPENED containers: Tape a note showing current date, approximate quantity inside; designated area where product/material is used – if any.   Example: “10/01/2014, 1/2 gallon, guest rooms 100-200/even numbered”

(3) Tape a PATTERN SWATCH on the top and front panel of every box, package, roll of wallcovering.

—-Tape a note showing current date, approximate quantity, designated area where item is used.

 B. Do the same for your custom tinted and ordered products and materials.

 

4. Maintain a Paint Shop Inventory List.

 

A. Install a MASTER LIST on your shop computer.

(1) Identify where each category of items is located: General area, cupboard, storage shed, etc.

(2) Remove specific items when you use them up or discard them.

(3) List new items when they come into the shop. Include items to be used up same day as delivery.

(4) Update your list every month. Know where you stand supply-wise.

 B. Print out at least two hard copies of the list. Do this on a quarterly basis, at least.

(1) Put one copy in very conspicuous spot in the Paint Shop.

(2) Give a folder/bound copy to your supervisor.

NOTE: An inventory list can be an immense help at budget time, departmental supplies requisitioning times, for departmental meetings, when someone takes over for you (eg. annual vacation, illness, injury).

 

SOME SPACE-SAVING TIPS:

 

TIP 1: Make use of free-standing tool and supply kiosks – for small items.

TIP 2: Clean, empty paint cans and buckets make handy storage containers – eg. small brushes, roller covers, extenders.

TIP 3: Plastic 2-to-4 drawer storage units, on rollers, make great “Good-to-Go” portables for multiple projects/work orders that require similar supplies and tools. Dollar and charity thrift stores can be great places to buy these.

TIP 4: Put “dead” space to work for you. Under shelves, between cupboards, cabinets, on walls, etc.

TIP 5: Is your storage space limited? Place often-used products and materials in their own smaller section, area, cupboard, etc. Then, organize the rest by interior and exterior.

TIP 6: Place little-used products and materials in a nearby, accessible storage area/room. Example: Engineering supply shed. Get your supervisor’s approval beforehand.

 

Take heart, fellow painters! Especially, if you are responsible for paint shop operations. Better days and better ways are ahead for you. And, your Paint Shop!

 

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Find a few minutes, and a peaceful place – at work – to just sit and breathe easy. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Paint Shop I: Organizing and Storing, Part 2: Creating a Place

Creating a place for everything in your paint shop is a challenge. Especially, if your wall and floor spaces are limited.

Other factors enter into the process: number of people that use paint shop, location of shop in proximity to main department, and other departments; volume of traffic; who’s in charge of paint shop operations (YOU?); who manages entire area.

If you are responsible for paint shop operations, take charge. Create a plan that will work for you – and those around you. And, GRID your inventory into spaces that help you do your job like the professional that you are!

 

2. Create A Place for Everything: Gridding your space into sections by category, and use.

 

A. Interior products/materials:

 

(1) Paints. Sort in order of priority, or frequency of use. Store according to areas/uses.

a. General/base products: Standard colors, general use

b. Designated areas: Guest rooms/suites, offices, front offices, lobby, front desk, corridors, public restrooms, game rooms, food courts, restaurants, computer room, health club, theatre, conference center, etc.

 

(2)  Stains/varnishes/ special finishes.  Store in safety cabinet, designed for flammable or combustible products.

a. General/base products: Standard colors, general use

b. Designated areas: Rooms/suites, offices, lobby, front desk, corridors, restaurants, theatre, conference center, etc.

 

(3) Wallcoverings, borders, murals. Store according to areas used in – and in dry area.

a. General use

b. Designated: Rooms/suites, offices, lobby, front desk, corridors, restaurants, clubs, food court, health club, spa, public restrooms, conference center, etc.

* For each, specify location, room numbers, building numbers/names, etc.

c. Tools: Roller (9-in., 3/8-in. cover); level, broad knives, seam rollers, smoothing brush, plastic smoothing tool; Paper Tiger, paper scraper, 10-in-1 tool; shower cap; dust masks, vinyl gloves.

 

(4) Prep products/supplies. Group similar items together.

a. Sandpapers, caulking tubes/guns, fillers, sanding blocks.

b. Scrapers, putty knives, steel wool, Patch sticks.

c. Solvents, thinners, removers, paint strippers.

d. Cleaning chemicals: TSP (alkaline, grease, de-glosses); denatured alcohol (cleans metal); Calgon, Downy; white vinegar (mild acid rinse);  Goof-off 2;

e. Masking paper, tapes, plastic sheeting, masking film.

 

(5) Cleaning/Clean-up Supplies. Conserve space.  TIP: Store  smaller items inside larger ones.

a. Sponges, bags of rags, buckets.

b. Trash bags – different sizes, strengths

 

(6) Protective gear/Safety items. Store gear together, in same section.

 

TIP: Keep related items together.

 

B. Exterior products/materials/supplies/tools/equipment:  Include special sections like the above in “A.”

 

(1) Paints

 a. General use:

 b. Designated: Pools, gazebos, courts, playgrounds, parks, seating, fencing, front entrance, parking, canopy, asphalt, etc.

 c. Compliance/Safety/Zoning

 

(2) Special coatings – for metal, concrete, asphalt, plastic, tile, etc.

 

(3) Exterior stains, polyurethanes, urethanes

 

(4) Prep and cleaning supplies

 

(5) Tools and equipment

 

(6) Protective gear and safety items

 

PAINT WORKSHOP STORY: My father was a superb journey painter and decorator. One of the best in the trade. And, one of the busiest! When he died suddenly in 1993, he left a major mess in his private workshop on the family’s country property. Chaos is a polite word for the disorganized piles, stacks, buckets, etc. of everything everywhere.

The job of making sense of it all – unearthing the inventory, sorting it, discarding what couldn’t be used, inventorying, labeling, organizing, then assigning a price/value to every item – fell on the grieving shoulders, hands and hearts of my mother and myself. (It didn’t help the grieving process.)

JOURNEY PAINTER’s SHOP TIP: Get your paint shop in shape. And, keep it that way. Whether it amounts to a few shelves, a mid-sized room with an adjacent workroom, or a free-standing building/shed. You’ll be glad that you did. So will everyone around you when they need to step into your shoes. Even for a day, or only an hour.

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Staying organized is much easier than you might think. Once you get used to it! Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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