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Posts tagged ‘Paint brushes’

Painting It: Paint Brush Budgeting

 

The realm of paint brushes is varied and highly specialized. This, of course, depends on the surface you are painting.

 

At the bottom are the chip brushes. They are low in quality and price, and also disposable if you choose not to clean them.

 

Located at the top are the faux finishing brushes. They can be expensive. And, they are designed for specific surfaces, materials, and effects.

 

Generally, if you care at all about the final results of your work you will choose the most appropriate and highest quality tool available for the job.

 

In some cases, the purchase of a brush should be viewed as an investment. That’s especially true when the cost reaches in excess of two hundred dollars.

 

When it comes to a typical good quality brush, expect to pay anywhere between fourteen and twenty three dollars.

 

Why the difference in cost? Brushes are specialized tools. They are manufactured using different types of materials and processes. The cost of the brush depends on what went into making it.

 

List of typical brushes, their material and their designated use:

 

  1. Nylon: Use with latex products only.
  2. Nylon/Polyester: Use with waterborne and oil based products.
  3. China Bristle: Use with oil, epoxy, and polyurethane based products.
  4. Badger: Use with oil-based paints and glazes.
  5. Sable: Use with acrylic latex products.

 

Paint Brushes in a Commercial Sense

 

Residential, decorative, commercial, and industrial painting each require a variety of brushes to complete  the task, and project.

 

Residential painting and decorating, often considered to be more specialized, can incorporate the use of fine artist brushes to larger size brushes for big wall painting on drywall, masonry and so on.

 

Decorative painting and decorating, considered the most specialized in the field, incorporates a wide variety of specially designed fine artist and creative brushes, also other applications tools.

 

Commercial painting and decorating is designated by the use of waterborne and solvent born products. Here, you use brushes primarily for high production purposes.

 

Industrial painting usually requires the use of specialized types of coatings. Thus, brushes containing natural hair are used. Example: China bristle,the main choice.

 

An old adage applies here: ”You get what you pay for.”

 

In any sense, look for a brush where the bristles are (1) tightly compacted and (2) tapered at the end. This makes for a quality brush. One which holds a reasonable volume of paint and produces very fine cut lines.

 

JOURNEY PAINTER’S TIP: You will be using most of your brushes quite often. So, it is important to have a brush which feels real good in your hand.

 

Don’t laugh. I once used a brush which caused my hand to ache every time I used it. Finally, I beveled the handle, sanded it and applied a polyurethane clear coat. It turned out to be better than new.

 

Remember: Buy only the best brush that you can, when quality is your greatest concern. Besides, a $25.00 brush can last a long time. Especially, if you treat the brush right!

 

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Don’t forget: Your teeth aren’t the only important items that need brushing.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

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Painting It: Choosing the Right Paint Brush

Many people believe any brush will do. On the contrary!  You will find that, in order to paint effectively, there is a specific paint brush for every need.

 

Generally, there are two types of brushes: the nylon/polyester, which is used to apply waterbourne paints and coatings, example: latex, and the China Bristle which is used to apply petroleum based solvent type materials, example: enamel.

 

 Some examples of brushes used with specific materials

 

  1. Oil based Varnish and Polyurethane: 3 inch white China bristle (preferred).

 

  1. Water based latex, acrylic clear coat: 1-4 inch nylon/polyester, 2½-3 inch (preferred).

 

  1. Oil/alkyd/enamel paints/coatings: 1½-3 inch black China bristle; 2½-3 inch (preferred).

 

  1. Epoxy/Urethane paints: 2½-3 inch black China bristle.

 

  1. Shellac-alcohol based coatings: 2½- 3 inch black China bristle.

 

  1. Ammonia based coatings: 2½ -3 inch nylon/polyester.

 

*Selecting a paint brush based on the material being used is half of the equation. One must also consider the surface or object you intend to paint.

 

Typically, you can base your selection on the size or detail of the project. Painting walls or ceilings requires a different brush than painting window trim.

 

A few examples which illustrate that fact

 

  1. Painting a Wood Door. Use a 1½-2 inch angular brush. These brushes are designed for trimming around hinges, edges and recessed panels.

 

  1. Painting a Wall or Ceiling. Use a 2½-3 inch angular brush or a 3-4 inch square brush. Use these brushes for large open flat areas with little or no detailed trim work.

 

  1. Painting an Ornamental surface. Use a 1-2½ inch angular brush, or selection of artist brushes depending on intricacy of surface or object.

 

  1. Painting Furniture. Use a 2 inch square brush with a narrow ferrule. Select a brush with fine bristles to reduce brush strokes.

 

Helpful Hints to Remember

 

  1. Always use the recommended solvent to clean your brushes. If you do not, your brush may be a one-time use only tool.

 

  1. Store brushes in a hanging container. Or lay flat with bristles wrapped in newspaper, or in the original brush protector.

 

  1. Load China bristle brushes with linseed oil to keep softened.

 

  1. Load nylon/polyester brushes with soap to keep soft.

 

  1. When cleaning paint brush bristles, use a fine wire brush to remove paint.

 

  1. Buy good quality brushes. Consider them an investment, especially if you’re a painter by trade. I recommend Purdy, Wooster and Sherwin-Williams brands.

 

A Painter’s paint brush is an essential, basic tool, like a wrench used by a mechanic. To continue to use it: keep it clean and use it as recommended.

 

One of the best paint brushes I ever used was a brush owned by my father. The brush was thirty-five years old. And, it was made by Purdy.

 

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SPECIAL THANKS: To all of the trade painters, who have been emailing or calling with requests and suggestions for “Painting with Bob.”

 

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting with Budget Cuts: Your “Paint Shop” Brushes

Seventy-five percent of the time, I used my own brushes to paint surfaces at the hotel. Most of the brushes were manufactured by Purdy.

 

Consistently, they handled perfectly, performed well, and produced – left behind – the fine surface application finish that I wanted and needed. Consistently, they met all standards for a top quality paint brush.

 

Our “Paint Shop” owned many paint brushes.

 

However…

 

The good quality brushes – Purdy, Wooster – had bristles missing, or too many split ends from wear, versus “flagging”. Also their edges were worn unevenly. And, dried clumps of paint melded multiple natural bristles together up near the “ferrule” (metal section that holds the bristles).

 

A sign of a good brush: “Flagging.” That refers to split ends that were manufactured on or in individual bristles, then housed within the brush’s “ferrule.”

 

The poorer quality brushes had bristles made of synthetic fibers, such as nylon. Most had bristles that were very worn, “fuzzy” at the edges, and poorly maintained. Overall, their low level of maintenance equated with their low level of investment at purchase time.

 

The other engineering staff members, that did painting touch-ups on my days off, used brushes from the “Paint Shop.” These maintenance techs did the best they could do with what they had to work with.

Sometimes, I had to go back later, and repaint the surface(s) they’d done. Management’s complaints were always about the appearance and coverage of the touched-up surfaces. They were never aimed at the techs themselves.

 

When number-crunching necessitates the purchase and use of less than Purdy or Wooster caliber brushes, try these tips. Especially for your “Paint Shop.”

 

1. Brushes to purchase.

 

Brands: Linzer, Branford, Arro Worthy, Merrit, Bestt Liebco, Proform.

Types: China (natural boar’s hair) bristles, Nylon/polyester.

Bristle compositions: China bristle, nylon/polyester, synthetic.Brush thicknesses: ¼-inch to 1-inch. Standard brush widths: 1-inch to 4-inch.

 

TIP: Thickness determines the volume of paint that the brush will hold. The width of brush to use is determined by the size of surface, object, or area.

 

NOTE: Nylon/polyester combination bristle brushes are a good “paint shop” choice. They can be used with both water-based and oil-based products. Exceptions: Urethane, polyurethane, epoxy products.

 

2. Which brushes to use with what types of product.

 

Nylon brush:                        Paint product(s): Latex, all water soluble finishes (clear acrylic).

Nylon/polyester brush:   Paint product(s): Latex, oils, alkyds.

China (boar) brush:          Product(s): Oils, varnishes, polyurethanes, epoxy, stains.

 

TIP: Most manufacturers label their brushes about uses – types of products to use.

 

3. Which brushes to use on what surface(s).

 

China (boar) brush:              Surface(s): Wood, metal, masonry, gypsum board (eg. drywall).

Nylon brush:                            Surface(s): Wood, masonry, gypsum board (including drywall).

Nylon/polyester brush:      Surface(s): All surfaces.

Low nap roller:                       Surface(s): Synthetics, plastics, etc.

 

NOTE: Which brush to use depends on the surface to be coated, and product to be used.

 

4. How to clean and maintain which brushes.

 

China (boar) brush:            Cleaning agent(s): Mineral spirits, lacquer thinner, methyl/ethyl ketone.

Cleaning method: Soak, wire brush bristles, “spin out.”

Nylon brush:                           Cleaning agent(s): Soap and water.

Cleaning method: Soak, wire brush bristles, rinse, “spin out.”

Nylon/polyester brush:     Cleaning agent(s): Soap and water, or solvent cleaner.

Cleaning method: Soak with appropriate solvent, wire brush bristles, rinse, “spin out.”

Custom brush:                       Cleaning agent(s): Follow manufacturer’s instructions for brush.

Cleaning method: Follow manufacturer’s instructions for the brush.

 

TIP:  Always check primer/prep, paint or finish label for the proper clean-up method and product/solvent to use.

Example: If the label says “Use lacquer thinner” to clean up tools, use it. Also, that means use on brushes with natural bristles only.

 

 
5. Four ways to recycle brushes too worn for regular use.

 

  1. Clean and use as a surface duster.
  2. Use for one to three small projects, then throw away the brush.
  3. Use brush for hard-to-reach places, where bending bristles won’t matter.
  4. Use for solvent cleaning or degreasing.

 

6. When to retire and replace which of your “Paint Shop” brushes.

 

All “PAINT SHOP” brushes. Replace: When bristles have lost their flexibility, are worn unevenly, and/or fall out. Also, replace when dried paint comes out into freshly applied paint or finish, painted surface shows a lot of brush marks, etc.
 

TOP TIP: Retire a paint brush from active service before the brush’s finish retires your good reputation as a painter and decorator.

 

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“Brush your surfaces with a fine finish! Finish your surfaces with the best brush you can afford!”

 

Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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