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Posts tagged ‘paint colors’

Painting It: Susika’s “First Real Bedroom”

 

Susika was a ten-and-a-half year old when we met. Her aunt and U. S. Marine uncle had brought her home with them, after the mass family funeral in the Middle East. On the plane, they promised her a “real bedroom.”

 

Uncle “J.J.” and several handy friends knocked out a wall to add six feet to the small 10-feet by 9-feet space.

 

Here’s how they outfitted what Susika called her “first real bedroom.”

 

  1. On 15-feet window wall: Built in a window seat, with bookshelves on each end, and two roomy, half-cupboards underneath.
  2. On each side of window seat unit: A roomy closet: one for clothes, the other for her “stuff.”
  3. On other three walls: Wall rails and one-half wainscoting.
  4. Floor covering: Wall-to-wall, commercial grade carpeting: Colors: Pastels in pink, rose, cranberry, mint green, forest green. Pattern: Splashes and Swirls.
  5. Bed Furniture: Wood twin bed, 6-drawer dresser, 2 night tables. From uncle’s elderly neighbors.
  6. Old wooden desk and chair. Shared by her mother and “J. J.” as children.
  7. Small arm chair. Once used by older cousin, now in college.
  8. Toy chest. Originally belonged to her uncle.
  9. Bean bag chair, vinyl. Color: Hot pink. New. A gift from that cousin in college.
  10. Four-shelf, three-drawer unit. For stuffed animals and dolls. Yard sale purchase.
  11. Bulletin-White board. For hanging above desk. Purchased at Wal-Mart.

MY JOB: Paint and finish coat everything paintable. And, there was a lot.

 

Susika chose her new room’s paint colors from Glidden’s® “Make It Magical with Disney” line.

(For information: www.disneypaint.com.)

Color scheme: Soft white, pastel pinks and greens, also tinted forest green.

Paints used: Interior semi-gloss and high-gloss latexes; also artist acrylics.

 

SURFACES and AREAS, COLORS

 

Ceiling: Glidden Color No. WDPR03. Color: A Wave of the Wand. Finish: Popcorn textured.

Upper and built-in walls, closets: Color No. WDPR03. Color: A Wave of the Wand (tinted Pink).

Rails, vertical wood wainscoting, doors, trim; also window and cupboard doors: Color No. WDPR08. Color: Fairest of Them All.

Furniture: Color No. WDPR10. Color: Water Lily.

33-year old 4-shelf/3-drawer unit: Base coat Color No. WDPR03. Color: A Wave of the Wand; Glazed Top coat: Color No. WDPR10 Color: Water Lily. Faux application: Random sponging.

Tops of dresser and night tables: 2-coat Faux glaze. Coat 1: Color No.: WDPR10. Color: Water Lily; Coat 2: Color No. WD FY05. Color: Fairy Flight. Faux application: Sponging, Ragging.

Built-ins and Window Seat Wall: Natural Stain; Sealer/Finish coat: Low-gloss polyurethane.

 

The entire painting project took a little more than a week. I used a large, cleaned out shed to re-finish the furniture pieces. It was equipped with central A/C. All other surfaces and areas were primed and finish-coated inside of the room.

 

PRODUCT MANUFACTURERS
Paints-Primers, finish coats: Glidden’s “Make It Magical with Disney.”

Stains, finish coats: Miniwax sealers, stains, varnishes, polyurethanes.

Artist Paints/Detailing: Liquitex Acrylics.

 

Painting and decorating children’s rooms is a lot of fun. Especially, when the painter is included in the project from the theme, design, color, and pattern selection stage.

  1. Every project is different. Every child’s preferences and needs are unique.
  2. The elements – theme, design, color, pattern – vary a lot.
  3. The products and materials used, in combination, are always one-of-kind.
  4. Working creatively within the budget draws on untapped energy, imagination and resources.
  5. A special sense of satisfaction bubbles forth as a child’s “special space” takes shape.

 

ABOUT SUSIKA
Susika’s completed room was very special for an added reason. She was a war orphan, legally adopted by her only living adult relative: an American military officer. Susika’s mother, the military officer’s sister, was an American educator that taught the children of enlisted officers stationed in the Middle East. Her father was a U. S. educated Middle Eastern professor and administrator.

 

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“My own room! It’s like having my private place in Heaven.”   Susika

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Thank you, fellow painters and decorators, for brightening the lives of others.
And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Painting It: Accent Colors Change Appearance and Enhance Amenities

Every four years, a small chain of London area boutique hotels changes its color on the accent wall in each guest room. The owners believe that their clientele, largely repeat visitors, appreciate this gesture.

 

“They like the uplift,” emailed the company’s senior painter. “We are careful to select a color that is just coming into vogue.”

 

For 2017, the hotels’ owners have authorized their (three) staff painters to also apply the new accent color to the vanity alcove and nearby walk-in closet in each room. “This blends the different areas together…” the painter added.

 

The guest reviews have been very positive. Examples: “Lovely effect when entering bath area.”  “Most inviting color unity.”  “Pleasant add-on.”  “Delightful change.”

 

The senior painter ended his e-mail by saying, “I recommend the accent wall for any room or area. It enhances appearance and updates the décor at minimal cost…”

 

 

10 ADVANTAGES TO ADDING ACCENT COLORS TO DÉCOR

 

  1. It changes the overall appearance of the specific area, and entire room.
  2. It changes the overall “feel” of the room.
  3. It freshens the overall look of the entire room or suite.
  4. It enhances the benefits of the standard amenities in the room or area.
  5. It upgrades the overall design of the room or suite.
  6. It updates the color scheme in the room or suite.
  7. It expands the standard color scheme’s customer/guest appeal.
  8. It expands the area’s marketability.
  9. It offers positive visual change at a marginal cost.
  10. It offers a way to use up premium paint in colors no longer a part of color scheme.

 

 

10 UNIQUE APPLICATION TIPS FOR USING ACCENT COLORS

 

  1. Reverse the “apply accent color to the wall” rule. Apply the accent color to the trim, doors and frames, and window sills located on one wall.
  2. Spray paint the ceiling in the new accent color.
  3. Use accent color to faux finish a 3-inch border around the parameter of the ceiling.
  4. Create a vertical stripe effect by alternatively painting the accent color every 2 or 3 inches over the wall’s existing color.
  5. Create a drop ceiling effect by applying accent color in a 3 inch border around ceiling, then down 3 inches at the top of all four walls.
  6. Paint accent color on the worst-condition wall and/or trim surfaces in a room.
  7. Paint accent color adjacent to the surface in the worst condition – eg. dents, poorly matched to touch-ups, gouges, minor water damage.
  8. Hardwood and/or tile floors? Paint “pathway” from inside entry doorway all the way to the bathroom’s tub area. Note: A clear over coat may be advisable.
  9. Create draped canopy effect on bed wall by painting accent color in alternate space, from marked vertical center.
  10. Paint 3-inch block border around one wall in room, painting alternate blocks in accent color.

 

You get the picture. When it comes to applying accent paint colors, your options are wide open!

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paintshop: Equipping Engineering Techs with Right Paint Colors

My biggest staff painter challenge was ensuring that the other engineering techs to use the correct paint products for handling “painter” work orders on my days off. Mainly touching up surfaces in guest rooms and visible public areas.

 

They had neither the “eye” nor the time to match paint products in the shop to the paint colors of smaller areas needing repainting.

 

Yes, it was easy for them to find all of the cans of yellow latex paint, for instance. A paint chip was displayed on the lid of each container. And, it was easy to identify which cans of yellow paint had been used in the guest room originally in Building Two.

 

However, it was difficult to select the exact matching tint of yellow latex needed to touch up a particular spot or wall in a particular room. One reason: Over time, the original paint color on the wall would have faded or discolored. Why: Due to sun exposure, repeated household chemical cleanings and/or surface damage.

 

In most instances, after returning from days off, I’d quietly re-touch up the “touch-ups.” No big deal was made about the error in paint color selection. Nothing was said about the added time that it took to back pedal, and redo painting work orders. And, I’d never say a word to the tech about the chief engineer’s or general manager’s related complaints.

 

Painters, here’s one method to simplify the paint color selection job for your techy teammates.

 

  1. Go through all of the paint cans in the shop.
  2. Create a chart showing a chip for every paint can you have.
  3. Take the paint chip chart along as you make your daily rounds – eg. guest rooms, public areas, activity rooms, offices.
  4. Match each chip to the surface/area that it matches, and notate information.
  5. Back in the shop, add surface, area/wall and room information to every paint can label in the place. Write date that you matched the paint chip to surface.
  6. Group and shelve the paint cans according to building and room/area.
  7. Put up a small “poster” to identify those products by area.
  8. Make up a quick-reference wall chart for your engineering teammates.
  9. Give each guy a little one-on-one tour of the paint can setup. Show how to use the set up to their advantage.

 

NOTE: My engineering teammates made it clear that they did not like the hassle they got from the bosses, hotel management and guests  about the use of the wrong paint products and/or colors.

 

FOOTNOTE: You are bound to run into this type of problem. It really can’t be prevented totally.

 

BEST PIECE OF ADVICE: Do your best to keep the paint products in the paintshop organized and easy to access. Also, go easy on your teammates. They’re just trying to cover for you when you’re unable to be there.

 

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Train your engineering teammates in the paint touch-up methods that work for everyone.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Them: Theatres and Entertainment Areas

An area meant for entertainment should look the part.

 

All design elements should add to the total atmosphere. Every color, textile, and finish should serve as a backdrop for, or complement to, the theatre screen or stage area.

 

Special features: Low-dim-dark lighting; top acoustics; track lighting, colored lights; music for all types of moods – and sets the mood for movie or activity.

Construction elements: Create angles to walls and ceiling. Install cornices and crown molding; a multi-step wall base. Add a couple of columns for interest.

Design elements: Complementary toned-down installations: Seating upholstery/fabric, flooring, chrome. Gloss-over ceilings. TIP: Carpeting with subdued graphic design.

Special needs: Flat, non-reflective and non-distracting finishes and coverings on all surfaces and areas. Large, legible signage – eg. exit, traffic patterns, seating areas. Very accessible seating.

TIP: Bannisters, rails, etc. painted to be very visible for holding onto, and walking in dark area.

Color schemes: Complementary colors/tints/shades; soft earth tones with bright accent colors.

TIP: Bright colors work great in small areas.

Wood finishing: Bright colored stains, instead of earth tone colors.

Wallcoverings: Panoramic mural, abstract or realist; carpet wallcoverings; solid, or vertical-striped monochromatic textured panels, hung in alternate sections.

 

A FEW HOW-TO TIPS  

 

  1. Repair and maintenance: Re-glue loose wallpaper seams. Wash wallcoverings regularly; vacuum if wall carpeting used. Regularly, wash all metal surfaces – eg. chair arms, railings.
  2. Prepping: Sand all surfaces. Spackle small holes. Caulk all cracks.
  3. Painting and finishing: Ceilings – Flat latex or enamel. Decorating idea: Midnight blue like night sky, then glitter spray or hand-paint in stars. Walls – Dark tones, solid, complementary or monochromatic. Columns – Flat or eggshell enamel. Faux finish for style – eg. marbleizing, sponging, etchings.
  4.  Wallcoverings: Walls – Dark tones, same color or complementary. Columns – Cover in same wallcovering used on walls, to blend into décor. Use contrasting covering to make area stand out.
  5. Products, supplies, tools, equipment: Tools – Smoothing brushes; razor blade/ broad knives.
  6. Challenge: Preventing/reducing reflection of surfaces. Using wallcoverings that absorb the sound. Finding paints that add appeal and ambience, maximize durability, and tone down other surfaces (eg. railings).

 

The ambience of a theatre or entertainment area plays a vital role in its appeal, use, and popularity.

 

Are you the painter and decorator responsible for this area? Aim for top-quality prepping, painting and finishing, and maintenance results. So good that, when the lights are UP, persons see great workmanship, smooth surfaces, “seamless” wallcovering seams. A memorable scene!
Keep in mind: Many people use, and are associated with, these areas. Having surfaces that are low maintenance and very durable is essential. And, cost-effective in the long-term!

 

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“Let us entertain you” includes the surfaces, as well as what’s on the screen, or on the stage.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

 

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