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Posts tagged ‘Paint manufacturers’

Paintshop: The Truth About Paint

“You get what you pay for” goes for paint and supplies as well.

 

For the painter, it is important to get the best value out of the products chosen. Painting materials must guarantee some degree of durability to retain their worth over time. You look for something else if they don’t.

 

What separates a quality paint product from one at the bottom of the barrel? One is a quality-formulated product; the other pretends to be one, particularly as they try to compete.

 

Typically, you can rely on a paint product which is a high-end brand name. And within that, the most expensive is normally the best. The reason is research and development.

 

When a company focuses on making a better, longer lasting product, the result should be a more durable product. At the same time, the manufacturers of all higher-end products do try to make improvements to even their lower-end, cheaper materials.

 

When it comes to paint, here’s what you should look for:

  1. amount of pigment.
  2. volume of solvent. CAUTION: Some paints have more water than they should.
  3. cost per gallon, versus the cost per five-gallon unit (not more than $15/$130.)
  4. paint is not manufactured by a foreign subsidiary of main brand.
  5. product has UV protection. TIP: If it doesn’t the surface may oxidize faster.
  6. binder percentages in paint are equivalent to similar priced and types of paint.
  7. viscosity test level information. TIP: My opinion: Paint is worthless if the material is too thin.
  8. Paint with primer” added is a misnomer. CAUTION: The chemistry of either cannot be combined to produce the same results as when the primer is applied by itself, then later the finish paint.

 

About Primers. A primer bonds to the surface. It provides a porous anchoring surface that the top coat to which it can bond effectively.

 

“Paint with primer” products skip one critical step. Be careful about this, especially if you’re an experienced painter. The time and money you think you are saving, along with the idea that your work has become easier, diminishes the actual quality of the job itself. You could be painting something twice in a year instead of once.

 

Now, who has the best Paint?

The two central choices are Glidden and Sherwin Williams. They have a long and valued reputation for making high quality, long lasting and moderately priced coatings. For the price, they are also the most diverse in their product types. Sherwin Williams, by far, has the best industrial line.

In its response to the residential market, the Behr paint line is exceptional, as well, although the pricing is somewhat higher than Glidden. For stains, Minwax and Olympic are without real competition. They also have a long history behind them. In the automotive industry, I would rate DuPont as the best option.

 

What are the most durable paints?

 

The three that I select the most are the following:

  1. Elastomeric compounds for exterior commercial masonry surfaces,
  2. Two-part Urethanes for automotive refinishing,
  3. Two-part Epoxy products for commercial/industrial corrosion and abrasion resistance.

 

Within reason and knowledge of these products, they may be purchased and applied by the general public.

 

A True On-Site Story…

 
I once painted a smoke stack with a silicon, heat resistant alkyd paint. The label said the product was resistant up to 600 degrees Farenheit.

After two days of curing, the smoke stack was put back into service. That same day the paint bubbled and peeled off, sending sheets of paint floating to the ground. It had been shown that the temperature of the metal heated to a consistent 625 degrees. Was it the paint product’s fault?
Several days later, I repainted the stack with another heat resistant product. This time it was a high-heat, aluminum fibered material. Once the stack became heated, everything turned out fine, no loose or peeling paint. In this case, I said it was the paint. Go figure.

 

Every experienced painter has a less than favorable on-site story to relate. Hopefully, yours had a positive ending, like mine did. Eventually.

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Best wishes from “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert  D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paint Manufacturer Networking…

 

For over thirty-three years, my father made it a special point to stop by and visit area paint manufacturers’ stores and warehouses. Year-round, the paint shop’s schedule ran bone-tight. And, my father’s schedule allowed little or no time to spare

 

Still, he paid a visit to at least one paint supplier. Every week. He believed in taking a special interest in the persons that operated those stores. The professionals that serviced customers. Like him.

 

He respected them. And, he listened to what they had to say.

 

  1. He picked up special orders, and more products and supplies.
  2. He wanted to ensure that the men had what they needed to do their jobs.
  3. He wanted to ensure that the men could finish current projects as contracted: according to specification, in compliance, and on, or ahead of, schedule.
  4. He helped the on-site and project foremen and crews out.
  5. He requisitioned, purchased, and picked up orders.
  6. He loaded up with valuable stuff, and carried it back to the shop and/or onto our job sites.
  7. Product samples.
  8. Industry news.
  9. Insider notifications about new architectural/construction projects.
  10. Advance announcements of scheduled demonstrations, certification programs, etc.

 

He knew them all. He knew everyone at each store. He knew which company manufactured and sold the better, or best, product for each specific surface, area, and job. Also, the most cost-effective price.

 

He knew who to ask about what. He knew who to trust – who would tell it to him straight. Including both the pros and cons of their own products, materials and supplies.

 

Occasionally, it worked out that I could go along when my father needed to pick up supplies. His main regular stops: MAB, Sherwin-Williams, Glidden, PPG, Benjamin Moore, Duron, Valspar.

 

 

I don’t follow in those footsteps – exactly.

 

I try to stop by a paint store once a month – besides for picking up supplies. My biggest reasons:

 

(1) to visit with the store manager or assistant manager;

(2) to pick a technical consultant’s or manufacturer rep’s brain;

(3) to run into other area painters and decorators; and,

(4) to check on what’s new, changed, discontinued, etc.

 

I’m not as skilled, as my father, at paint store “stop-offs.” I’m not as tuned-in as he was. My stops at local paint manufacturer stores are briefer, and less often. They are more like: “Run in, say ‘Hi,’ visit for five minutes, get what I need, load it onto my truck, leave the experts to their work, and drive away.”

 

Back in August, I was drafting a blog about a special ceiling paint project done over two years ago. Last month, on the same 91-degree afternoon, I stopped at three manufacturer stores, Michael’s Crafts, and  Home Depot to re-check my facts for the products and materials that I’d used on that project.

 

It was good to see that, at the paint manufacturer stores and at Home Depot, painters’ and painting contractors’ trucks filled the parking lots. And painters in their “whites” were shopping inside.

 

At Sherwin-Williams, I re-checked color chip numbers and names for primers and paints.

 

At Gliddens, I watched the live demonstration of a newer commercial clear coat that floats glossy smooth onto any interior surface.

 

At Porter Paints/PPG, the manager rummaged in an old cabinet, and found a color, or “paint chip,” book from 2013.

 

At Michael’s, an artist paint product expert showed me a few application advantages of Liquitex, when painting special-effects “virtual” walls in children’s bedrooms or play areas. Exciting!

 

At Home Depot, the coating specialist got me a sample of Behr’s acrylic resin coating for residential driveways. And, I helped a lady customer understand how to get a visually accurate idea how her selected grey blue paint color would look in her bedroom.

 

The thing is…

 

In 2015, painters’ visits to the actual paint stores are an anomaly. Any supply or sample can be ordered on-line, and delivered to the door. Product information, composition, colors and finishes, pricing, availability, shipping terms, etc. can be researched on manufacturer, distributor and industry websites.

 

Paint stores e-mail their news, announcements, notices, and invitations.

 

You can say “Hello,” “live chat,” and “keep in touch” with paint store managers and reps by Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, etc.  You can group-meet by Skypp.

 

What painter and decorator needs to stop by the actual store, like my father and his fellow crafts persons did?

 

Well… ME!   Perhaps you, too.

 

Stop by a paint manufacturer’s local store. Say “hello.” Get acquainted. Check out their product sales. Pick their brains. Tap into their networks. Stay connected. They are product and procedure experts. And, they are still great GO-TO guys.

 

Amazing product possibilities can surface for your next surface-finishing project at a paint store or paint shoppe.

 

Hot Summer Tip: Too hot and humid to put in those long hours painting outdoors? Knock off a little early. And, stop by a paint store you haven’t visited for too long. (A carry-in snack for everyone there might be a nice touch.)

 

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Discovery is a fun part of the work day. A time to get out your goals, and travel forward.

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Thanks to everyone that visits, follows, comments, and critiques “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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