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Painter’s World: On Being a Paint Superintendent, or a Boss

One time, I jumped all over my father for coming down hard on a new painter.

Dad said, “He deserved it.”

I said, “No, he deserved some respect. He deserved a chance to learn, then to get it right.”

Less than fifteen minutes later, my dad took the new crew member aside. He apologized and showed the man the correct way to do the job that he’d been assigned. Then Dad stepped away.

It was the first and last time that I ever heard him yell at a crew member. And, after he died, many painters told me that they had never heard him do that.

Yes, he raised his voice. Yes, he called out the painters when they deserved it. Yes, he corrected them. And yes, he even told them what to do.

But, when a painter was not getting it – or not getting it right, Dad would help him rectify the situation. Often cutting into his own time schedule that was already under tight constraints.

When more than one painter was not getting it at the same time, Dad stopped everything. And he conducted a little, on-site crash course. Whether the problem was a new product, a stubborn piece of equipment, a resistant surface, uncooperative weather conditions, etc., he showed the entire crew that was there what needed to be done. Or not.

During Memorial Day week-end, a retired and former member of our old crew e-mailed me the following…

“Bob, your dad was a commanding force wherever he went. Wherever he stood. I knew him for over forty years. We joined IBPAT (IUPAT) about the same time.

“He was a man to be reckoned with, but never a man that insisted on it. He knew the painting trade backward and forward, inside and out. He was so blamed skilled and experienced in the trade that he could do anything that he tackled. A top rate superintendent or foreman, a ‘take charge’ person that everyone respected…”

Working under my dad was overwhelming at times. His six-foot, 200-pound frame served him well for the job he was given in life. It partnered well with the way that he needed to run a job, paint crew, powerful piece of equipment, or even dealings with a client or architect.

And the nickname “Moose” suited him like a custom pair of whites. His caribou-like walk sort of shook the floorboards when he charged through a job site. More than once, I tensed up waiting for him to bellow.

Some painters and decorators are cut out to be superintendents or bosses. You just look at them, and you know that. You see it. You hear it. You sense it in the way that they approach even basic, mundane tasks. With a unique command of and presence in everything they do.

One more thing: Commanding forces such as my father often attract equally commanding forces. People just like them. In my father’s case, it happened to be very successful entrepreneurs and founders of established enterprises. Men and women whose natural inclination was to take charge… to assume responsibility… to accept accountability for how things turned out.

Being a superintendent or a big boss was never my thing. Thankfully. For one thing, I don’t know if my father could have taken the strain, or competition. (And my mother? Forget it!)

Early in my painting career, I found my niche: serving as the go-to guy for those superintendents and bosses. Their back up when trouble loomed, and things got tough. Fortunately, every one of them, including my father, has been more than glad to turn things over to me. And to trust me with them.

Being able to fulfill – and to exceed – their expectations and needs on a consistent basis has been so worth all the effort. And the hard knocks.

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Great leaders must have great people to lead.
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Thanks to all visitors to “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Heat Illness: Preparing-for-Prevention Tips for Painters: Part II

As painters and decorators, we are our own best advocates in preventing heat illness on the job. We must play an active role in the protection of our own health. We cannot leave the responsibility to our employers.

 

In fact, both OSHA and EPA limit the employer’s level of responsibility. Employers tend to make these work-related choices, and provide preventive measures at their discretion.

 

Now – the cooler months – is the time to come up with a plan to prevent and treat on-the-job heat illness symptoms.

 

Now is the time to determine how we will handle our workload during the sustaining hot and humid months/season. Especially in climates like Florida has from May through October.

 

NOW is the time to get the facts out about heat illness.

 

  1. Talk about it: types, symptoms, risks and warning signs, safety issues.
  2. Publicize it.
  3. Orient everyone on the team and staff about what to look for.
  4. Train team members and staff what to do, when, and how.
  5. Commit to on-going heat illness awareness and advocacy at the workplace.

 

Heat Illness Prevention Tips for Painters

 
1. Know your body.

A. What is your tolerance level to heat, humidity, and sun exposure (direct/indirect)?

B. What is your exertion limits within that tolerance level?

2. Know your work environment.

A. What is the highest temperatures in which you must work during the hottest, most humid season? How many hours a day? How many days a week?

B. What is the actual temperature felt by your body – with the heat index added?

C. What us the longest period of time during a work day, that you must work continuously in that actual temperature?

D. How many days during a week must you work continuously in those actual conditions?

E. What is the level of clean-air and ventilation within your work area(s) on a continual basis?

3. Know your job’s physical demands.

A. How many hours in a day must you work in hot, humid conditions? Number of days a week?

B. At how fast of a pace must you do your work? Very slow? Slow? Moderate? Fast? Very fast?

C. For how long a period must you keep up that pace? _____ minutes. _____ hours?

D. How many breaks do you get, ordinarily, each of these days?

1) At what times during the work day are the breaks scheduled?

2) How many additional breaks are you allowed during work days in hot, humid conditions?

3) How often can you take a break when heat and humidity conditions meet or exceed your tolerance level. (See 1 and 2 above.)

4. Know your physical limits in meeting the physical demands.

A. How many pounds can you lift, carry or move, ordinarily and at once?

1) Under hot, humid conditions, what is the maximum number of pounds? Without symptoms.

2) With B, do you need to use a cart or other conveyance piece of equipment?

B. How long can you climb and stand on a ladder?

1) Under hot, humid conditions, what is the maximum length of time? Without any symptoms

C. How long and often can you bend, stoop or crouch within one hour?

1) Under hot, humid conditions, what is the longest that you can do these? Without symptoms.

D. How long can you stand and how far can you walk without resting? Holding/carrying anything that weighs your maximum poundage? (See 4-A above.)

1) Under hot, humid conditions, what is the longest period and furthest distance that you can do these? Without any symptoms.

5. Know what your first heat illness symptoms may be.

A. What have been your first heat illness symptoms in the past?

B. What, if any, medical conditions that you have could cause or trigger heat illness symptoms?

C. What, if any, medications that you take could cause or trigger heat illness symptoms? Include over-the-counter products – eg. antihistamines, aspirins, nasal sprays.

 

Do you have a low tolerance level to any heat-humidity-ventilation environmental conditions?

  1. Avoid them. Work in cooler, shaded areas when above conditions do exist in other areas.
  2. Do not allow yourself to be placed in any situation that might cause, trigger and/or exacerbate your heat illness susceptibility.

 

SPECIAL LIFE-SAVING HEAT ILLNESS PREVENTION TIPS

 

  1. Schedule exterior painting during the coolest times of your work day. Examples: A. Dawn-to-10 AM. B. 5 PM-to-dusk or dark, or later.
  2. Plan to work on surfaces/areas opposite full-sun exposure. Examples: A. West and north sides of buildings when sun is over east and south sides.
  3. East and south sides of buildings when sun is on west and north sides.
  4. Plan to work in hot, humid areas when an emergency comes up. NOTE: Ordinarily, there are times when exterior painting must be done immediately.
  5. Wear short, white painter’s pants when you must work in outdoor temperatures 90 plus degrees. Regardless of the time period involved. NOTE: Get approval before the hot season arrives to adjust clothing to fit extreme heat/humidity conditions.
  6. Wear a cap or hat with a bill, when working and/or walking in the sun. TIP: Wider is wiser.
  7. Keep a drinking water supply with you at all times.
  8. Carry packs of small snacks in your pocket. Examples: Walnuts/almonds, Peanut M&Ms, raisins, trail mix, granola bars, energy bars.
  9. Carry frozen ice pack in small cooler on your golfcart or pushcart. While you’re at it, stick in a couple small cans of healthy juice. Examples: V-8, orange, apple. TIP: Pack a banana, too. High in potassium. Essential for sodium/hydration leveling.

 

BOTTOM LINE: The painter on duty must get his/her work done. One way or another. So watch out for yourself when the heat and humidity start to climb. And, set the standard for others to do the same.

 

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Learn and Live “Heat Illness” Free. Go to: www.osha.gov/heatillness.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015, 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s World: The Physician/Group-Insurance Company Generic Collaboration

I’m about ready to pull my graying  hair out, and go bald.

 

I take a Brand name medication that requires a prescribing MD’s prior-authorization request to access. Suddenly, the M.D. decided to stop completing and submitting a prior-authorization form for the Brand name to the insurance company.

 

“Totally unnecessary. Generic is exactly the same as brand name.”

 

What was that? Try to convince the Major Pharmas of that one!

 

Take note, fellow healthcare consumers:

 

As of the end of 2015, over 3 billion, 874 million* Americans take a generic form of a Brand name prescription drug. The National Prescription Audit’s most recent report** shows that 84.3 percent of prescription sales are the generic compound. Total generic sales topped $1.7 trillion dollars between 2005 and 2014.

 

At least 70 percent of those 3,874,000 are taking the generic, versus Brand compound, because of one or more of the following reasons.

 

  1. Their insurance company – eg. employer group, individual, family, Medicare, HMO – approves and has in its RX formulary only the generic versions of the Brand name prescription.

 

  1. Their healthcare provider will not order the Brand name as – eg. “medically necessary,” “Fill with RX Brand only,” etc. Note: See “Important Note” below.

 

  1. The patients cannot afford the cost of the Brand name pharmaceutical products.

 

  1. The local in-network pharmacies carry, or will order, only the generic version(s) of the Brand name product.

 

  1. The healthcare provider’s group, and its insurance company, will not certify the physicians in the group to write prior-authorization requests for and to prescribe Brand name products, when a generic is available. Note: See “Important Note” below.

 

Important Note: This includes if and when the patient tries and cannot take any of the generic (s) of the Brand name product. This includes if and when the patient has tried and retried, unsuccessfully, to take all of the generic compounds on the market. This can even include when a hospital consulting specialist determines that a patient must go back to taking the Brand name product.

 

One smaller health insurance company has found a solution. Well, it would appear to be one…

 

In its pharmacy formulary, the company includes a “suspension”/liquid form of a particular Brand name product. It is considered a compounded, “Specialty drug. At a Specialty drug tier/level price. This tier or level usually carries the highest price drugs in the insurance company’s pharmacy formulary.

 

A patient is caught in a bind. No choices that really benefit him or her.

 

Five of the Patient’s Options

 

  1. The patient can take and stay on a generic, regardless of adverse reactions, interactions, etc.

 

  1. The patient can self-pay 100 percent of the retail cost of the Brand name prescription drug.

 

  1. The patient can order the Brand name product from a Canadian pharmacy, hopefully one with a good track record for prompt delivery and sound ethical practices.

 

  1. The patient can change from the prescribing physician to one that will submit that prior authorization request for Brand name only.

 

  1. The patient can switch to a similar Brand name product that is in the insurance company’s pharmacy formulary, and does not require a prior authorization.

          Cautions: A.Most Brand name products listed in the formulary will require prior-authorization.                 B. Also, many newer Brand options come with much higher price tags.

 

What about simply changing your medication?

TIP: It may be wise to change from a medication that’s working only if you have to do so.

 

Real World Scenario. It’s very interesting to see and hear the reaction of another, leading healthcare provider, when told that a prescribing physician refuses to support an established patient’s need to stay on a Brand name prescription medication.

 

M.D.: “Did he/she say why?”

PATIENT: “I won’t do it…It’s totally unnecessary. Generic is exactly the same as Brand.”

M.D.: Tilt of his head…His eyes lower…He shakes his head left-to-right. “Hummmm.”

 

Guess what! A few poignant letters, including to the company’s president/ceo and group medical director may have gotten them all talking again, and rethinking their prior authorization policies. We’ll let you know. Keep your patient/healthcare consumer fingers crossed.

 

SOURCES

* “Statista Report on (Generic) Pharmaceutical Products and Markets, for 2015.”

* Also, The Generic Pharmaceutical Association.

** National Prescription Audit (for Generics), Report May, 2016.

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Responsible healthcare boils down to responsive treatment of the patient.

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Many thanks for trying to do your best in your world.

And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

“Painting with Bob’s Hassle-Free, Health-Conscious Dutch Apple Pie”

Dutch Apple Pie has been a favorite of mine since childhood. Thanks to grandmothers, great aunts, and other women in the kitchen at holiday time that were experts at baking Grand Prize winner pies. Usually from scratch, by the way.

 

So, the boy grows up. He still loves Dutch Apple Pie. He can’t find a ready-made version that comes anywhere close to those family-made pies. So, he learns to bake it himself.

 

The recipe below is my on-the-go-to-work-on-Thanksgiving-Day-version.

 

PWB DUTCH APPLE PIE INGREDIENTS – All purchased from a Wal-Mart Super Store. All packaged and canned products: Great Value label, actually name brand products packaged en quantity for Wal-Mart.

Pie shells: 2 deep dish pie shells, ready to fill.

Filling: 1 14-18 ounce can Apple Pie filling, no sugar added; 2 large apples, pared and sliced; 1 teaspoon corn starch, 1 can water.

Topping: 2 whole graham crackers, crushed; ½ cup bran flakes or Cheerios, crushed; 2 tablespoons olive oil or 1 stick butter, unsalted; 2 tablespoons sugar; 1 egg yolk, beaten. NOTE: Set aside unbeaten egg white.

 

PWB DUTCH APPLE PIE INSTRUCTIONS

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

FILLING

1.Into small saucepan, pour ¾ cup water. Add sliced apple pieces. Simmer on LOW for 5 minutes maximum. Drain water.

2. Into medium mixing bowl, spoon prepared Apple Pie filling. Add cooked apple slices. Set heat at MEDIUM.

3. Add corn starch and water. Stir till blended with filling from can. Cook on MEDIUM till mixture thickens. Remove from heat.

4. TIP: Brush egg white onto pie shell to keep pie filling from soaking through.

5. Pour entire mixture into one pie shell. Use spatula to get all of the filling from pan into shell. Spread mixture evenly so it touches shell’s sides.

6. Turn second pie shell upside down. Carefully, flip onto the filled pie shell. Use spatula to gently work shell down. With thumb and fingers, go around shell’s edges and push them together.

 

CRUMB TOPPING

1.In small bowl, combine topping ingredients. Mix well, till all crumbs are slightly moist. Mixture should look a little lumpy.

2. Spoon fine mixture onto top of pie. Spread evenly.

3. With fork (long prongs preferred), puncture small holes through topping, and into top pie shell.

 

BAKE pie for 45-50 minutes, or until bits of filling glaze bubble up through those small holes.

SERVE warm, or cooled.

 

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A blessed Thanksgiving to everyone.

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Thank you for sharing your experiences, ideas and thoughts – and for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paintshop: Equipping Engineering Techs with Right Paint Colors

My biggest staff painter challenge was ensuring that the other engineering techs to use the correct paint products for handling “painter” work orders on my days off. Mainly touching up surfaces in guest rooms and visible public areas.

 

They had neither the “eye” nor the time to match paint products in the shop to the paint colors of smaller areas needing repainting.

 

Yes, it was easy for them to find all of the cans of yellow latex paint, for instance. A paint chip was displayed on the lid of each container. And, it was easy to identify which cans of yellow paint had been used in the guest room originally in Building Two.

 

However, it was difficult to select the exact matching tint of yellow latex needed to touch up a particular spot or wall in a particular room. One reason: Over time, the original paint color on the wall would have faded or discolored. Why: Due to sun exposure, repeated household chemical cleanings and/or surface damage.

 

In most instances, after returning from days off, I’d quietly re-touch up the “touch-ups.” No big deal was made about the error in paint color selection. Nothing was said about the added time that it took to back pedal, and redo painting work orders. And, I’d never say a word to the tech about the chief engineer’s or general manager’s related complaints.

 

Painters, here’s one method to simplify the paint color selection job for your techy teammates.

 

  1. Go through all of the paint cans in the shop.
  2. Create a chart showing a chip for every paint can you have.
  3. Take the paint chip chart along as you make your daily rounds – eg. guest rooms, public areas, activity rooms, offices.
  4. Match each chip to the surface/area that it matches, and notate information.
  5. Back in the shop, add surface, area/wall and room information to every paint can label in the place. Write date that you matched the paint chip to surface.
  6. Group and shelve the paint cans according to building and room/area.
  7. Put up a small “poster” to identify those products by area.
  8. Make up a quick-reference wall chart for your engineering teammates.
  9. Give each guy a little one-on-one tour of the paint can setup. Show how to use the set up to their advantage.

 

NOTE: My engineering teammates made it clear that they did not like the hassle they got from the bosses, hotel management and guests  about the use of the wrong paint products and/or colors.

 

FOOTNOTE: You are bound to run into this type of problem. It really can’t be prevented totally.

 

BEST PIECE OF ADVICE: Do your best to keep the paint products in the paintshop organized and easy to access. Also, go easy on your teammates. They’re just trying to cover for you when you’re unable to be there.

 

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Train your engineering teammates in the paint touch-up methods that work for everyone.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s World: The Pro-Labor of Painting

Understanding and implementing labor strategies should be important to everyone who has a job. That is, perhaps with the exception of management. They tend to look out for the needs of the company.

 

Yet, both sides need each other to keep the business in business. They need each other to get the work done in an efficient, qualitative and cost effective manner. When this employee-employer relationship disappears, your job disappears.

 

In the painting trade, which is similar to all labor-intensive trade, the worker expects a fair wage for a reasonable day’s work. Employers expect and work hard to get as much work out of their employees as possible. I agree, as long as the employees’ health and safety are given the attention they deserve.

 

As a painter, what do you really want in the workplace? If asked, I would say (1) to feel appreciated, (2) to be respected, and (3) to be treated as a professional.

 

How are these objectives achieved?  From the standpoint of the employer-employee relationship?

 

1. Professional treatment. As the painter/employee, you know your job and what is required in order to keep it. And, on a consistent basis, you make every effort to perform your tasks in a responsible, productive manner.

 

2. Respect. As the painter/employee, you need certain provisions to be in place. Some of the more important ones include the respect and consideration of the employer, the tools to do the work, and enough time to do the work properly. (About tools: To start, painters need good quality brushes, roller covers, and reliable spray equipment.)

 

3. Appreciation. As a painter/employee, you have the right to have a safe, non-threatening environment in which to work. Both you and your employer have the responsibility to make sure it exists.

TIP A: When the employer drags his heels, be patient. And, try to find out why. Is it due to the cost and an unavailable budget? Consult your supervisor first; then your management or employer. It may be due to the cost of making it so.

TIP B: Don’t dismiss the need to pursue any possible resolution to the problem (s). Be patient.

TIP C: In an extreme case –eg. high toxicity, hazardous chemicals – OHSA (Occupational Health and Safety Administration) can guide you in the best direction.

 

4. Productivity issues. Organize an employee meeting as a group with your supervisor. Clearly (and truthfully) explain anything which keeps you from doing your job efficiently. CAUTION: Don’t blame or accuse anyone personally. Be tactful.

 

5. Wage/Salary issues. Fair wage/ salary is also on a painter’s mind. Don’t think about how much the company is making, or the salary raises for management. Instead, make known the value of your service to the company. Emphasize how you strive to do your best every day.

TIP A: If you must self-pay 100 percent of your health insurance, politely indicate that an increase in wage would be greatly appreciated.

 

 Now, using a more tactical response…

 

First, make sure you are doing all that you can to comply with company policy, productivity and employee regulations. If that fails to help you achieve any goals, follow one or all of the following objectives. NOTE: Some are more proactive than others.

 

1.Prepare yourself for presenting your concerns and issues.

 

TIP A: Write down a list of employee rights that your employer has denied you, and possibly others in the workforce. Make sure they are entitlements guaranteed under the law. Examples: lunch time (30 minutes or more), break availability, extended break time if necessary, compensation for work-related supplies, uniform requirements, workmen’s compensation, employer insurance payments, etc.

TIP B: Read then reread the company’s operations manual, if they issued one. Carefully make a note of any discrepancies or contradictions in their policies and procedures. Especially any that specifically relate to your department, or any other department with which you deal regularly.

TIP C: Compile definitive proof of misconduct on the part of the employer. File in a secure place.

TIP D: Find out the concerns and issues of other staff painters that you know in the region. What grievances do you share, and to what extent?

NOTE: In this process, your employer will probably look for ways to discredit you, starting with your attendance record.

CAUTION: It’s probable that you will lose your job sooner than later, be demoted, or be moved into another position at a different, less desirable location.

 

2. Ultimate response in labor relations. The painter/employee and employer relationship is based on group strength and unity. A number of painters standing together over a legitimate health and safety, or wage, issue can get better results with the employer, especially when you possess concrete and well supported evidence.

TIP A: It’s very possible that, through negotiation and mediation, a fair settlement can be achieved. Resulting in a win-win-win solution for everyone.

CAUTION: The painters may win the case; but they may have difficulty finding new jobs.

 

3. File a formal grievance. Depending on your issue, start with the following: Federal Wage Board/U. S. Department of Labor, OHSA, and EEOC. There are other agencies and organizations that may like to know about your problem.

CAUTION A: Especially when employee safety and health are concerned, fines could be levied until the employer sees fit to comply with the law. Some employers will initiate positive changes promptly. They do not want Federal sanctions on their books. Others will drag their heels, pay the fines at will, and refuse to comply.

CAUTION B: In the painter’s case, he may win or lose. This depends on whether or not the employer wants to do the right thing and improve working conditions.

CAUTION C: The employer may do nothing about the situation. But the employer will find probable cause to terminate you. Example: Employers, in any defendant’s hot seat, tend to shift the responsibility and costs to you. They will brand you as an difficult employee.

 

4. Promptly, locate another job. And resign from your present one.

CAUTION A: You may lose out. Especially if you like your current job, have a solid work record and possess growth opportunities.

CAUTION B: Consider that your job may not be secure at that point. The employer may have already been planning to hire someone to replace you.

 

5. Consider the option to start your own business. Especially if you have a good-to-excellent reputation in the field, possess some great connections and can float a low cash flow for two-to-five years before realizing a net profit. It can be a new beginning where you have control.

CAUTION A: Just remember that you become the employer now, just in case you hire anyone. Think of what you went through.

CAUTION B: Do you want, and are you able, to function well on the other side of the employer-employee scale?

 

BOTTOM LINE: As the labor-employee side of work, you must live up to your responsibility as designated by the employer. If not done, this will produce grounds for discipline or dismissal.

 

Your best asset is your service record. It can be a powerful, high-leverage weapon, when you are negotiating.

 

Validate your position. Hold your ground. Rally for support. And press on. Labor relations is about strength and commitment.

 

Points to Ponder:

  1. What do you have at stake in pursuing any grievance? Examples: current job; chances for promotion; wage/salary increases; benefit upgrades; growth opportunities in your field with other employers, or as an independent; family finances.
  2. Can you afford the potential short-term and long-term losses, and fallouts?

 

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Thank you for reading “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paintshop: When You Need to Re-think Your Own Practices

The time comes for every staff or facility painter to change the way he or she does certain things.

 

13 Reasons that may have you thinking – and thinking some more.

 

  1. Steadily plummeting budget puts a greater long-term squeeze on prioritizing essential tasks, work orders and projects.
  2. Way too much work load exists for the hours in your week.
  3. The new chief engineer on board believes in change and shaking things up a lot.
  4. The new chief engineer on board tends to fight your every move and decision.
  5. The external management company has its own ideas, policies and practices on how things must be done.
  6. The engineering staff has been cut. You will need to help out more with general maintenance tasks, work orders and troubleshooting.
  7. Your work hours have been cut. You’ll need to cut back – weed out – some duties.
  8. The new management is not happy with your current system.
  9. You may have access to more, or less, help from teammates.
  10. The business may have changed, calling for you to change with it.
  11. A shift in job description responsibilities requires you to add some, and let go of other, tasks.
  12. The business climate in the area may have improved, or turned sour.
  13. You may be burning out, disillusioned, or ready for something new, but where you’re at now. Making a move – changing jobs – may not be on your radar.

 

The real challenge may be in convincing yourself that the time to change your own practices has arrived. Answering three questions seems to help me along:

 

  1. Specifically, who is asking me to change the way I do things? Does the person know anything about how a paintshop needs to operate?
  2. On a scale of 1-10, how crucial is it that I change the practice or practices now, or at all?
  3. What are the advantages in making the change or changes now, versus in six months or a year from now?

 

My answers tend to be different, depending on which of my practices are on the chopping block, so to speak. With some? No big deal. Let’s make the change now. With others? Hands off till I can see how to do it that paintshop operations benefit, and do not suffer unnecessarily.

 

Bottom line: You’ll know what practice to change, and when the time is right for the paintshop. And you, too.

 

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A painter does not practice painting, like a doctor practices medicine.

A painter is expected to get it right the first time.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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