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Posts tagged ‘Painting projects’

Painter’s View: Ten Spaces and Ten Reasons to Paint on New Year’s Week-end

New Year’s week-end is a great time to pick up a brush, and paint.

 

Because of the busy holidays, at least some of your regular schedule is probably still on hold. You’re in a more relaxed, “winding down” mode. And, you’re already psyched up to try new things, new ways.

 

 TEN REASONS TO PAINT ON NEW YEAR’S WEEK-END

 

  1. You may have more time off to paint things other than assigned work orders and tasks.
  2. Paint stores are running super pre-2017 sales.
  3. Many product manufacturers’ websites and apps are offering two-and-three-for-one discounts.
  4. Manufacturers are offering introductory discounts on paint products in the new 2017 colors.
  5. You may need a physical outlet to vent that holiday season stress.
  6. At work, your chief engineer may be more amenable to your doing that creative project that you’ve suggested.
  7. At home, the holiday spirit will still be wide open for creative expression.
  8. Your energy and enthusiasm levels are still at a high.
  9. Your willingness may be greater to accept a little help from your crew.
  10. You “need to paint this now” – while you’re in the mood.

 

 TEN SPACES TO PAINT ON NEW YEAR’S WEEK-END

 

  1. Rooms at home: a bathroom, bedroom, sun porch, study/den, attic room, sewing room.

TIP: Steer clear of high activity areas during the holidays – eg. kitchen, media room.

  1. Areas at home: workroom in basement or garage, garage/barn loft, small apartment, workshop.
  2. Rentals: apartment, loft, duplex unit; small house, condo or townhome.
  3. Home-based work space: office, writing/artist studio, computer room/alcove, assembly room.
  4. On-site work spaces: bosses’ offices and bathrooms, art gallery offices, shop offices; kitchen/lunch room; non-profit offices, workrooms, or restrooms.
  5. Furniture: simply designed chairs, table in good condition, smaller dresser/chest, bed, smooth-surface desk, picture/mirror frames; bookcases, storage units.
  6. Built-ins: eating nooks, window seat areas, bookshelves, cabinetry doors/frames, home office cubicle.
  7. Fun spaces: Jewelry/treasure boxes; children’s sleeping loft or playhouse; children’s toy chest; dollhouse, play barn/fort; doghouse.
  8. Elderly friend/relative space: front entry, living/dining area, bedroom, den/study, enclosed sun room; ALF/retirement community apartment or villa.

TIP: Pre-arrange for the resident to stay with a neighbor, relative or friend for the week-end. Or,              perhaps in your home?

  1. Your church: Unless the buildings are new, nearly every room/area may need a pro painter’s touch.

TIP: Look for smaller rooms that have been ignored or neglected aesthetically. Examples: Sunday             school rooms, library room, workroom, bulletin/newsletter/printing room, office workroom and storage rooms; kitchen/pantry; choir practice room and robe storage.

 

TOP TIP: Make it a project of your choice. Make it a do-good, do-well endeavor.

 

P. S. My New Year’s project: Applying matching faux finish pattern to two, curbside discarded, two-drawer metal file cabinets.

 

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Happy New Year, everyone. Enjoy. Stay safe. Be well.

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Here’s hoping to hear from you in the New Year – 2017.

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob” during 2016.

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paintshop: Hotel and Facility Painters “Do Other Things”

Hotel and facility painters must be willing – and able – “to do other things.” In fact, it is a requirement listed in most job descriptions. Including the U. S. Department of Labor Directory of Occupations.

 

 Hotel Painter’s Short List of “Other Things to Do”

(Eg. Hotels, resorts, vacation spas, convention centers)

 

  1. Help clear out and clean up critical incident scenes and accident areas.
  2. Decorate property for holidays and special events.
  3. Clean and replace HVAC systems; make minor repairs to room A/C units, repair filters.
  4. Replace acoustical ceiling tiles, panels and grid frames; repair walls; replace doors, trims, baseboards.
  5. Dig, lay and bury underground WI-FI cable systems; replace modem units.
  6. Repair, or remove and replace pipes, plumbing, also lavatory parts; clear clogged drains.
  7. Repair, or remove and replace ceramic, glass, quarry, and other tiles.
  8. Cut out, remove and replace carpet sections and tiles.
  9. Remove and replace bath/shower/tub fixtures, safety bars/rails, etc.
  10. Repair, resurface or replace furniture, cabinetry, countertops; also vanities.
  11. Treat toxic black mold infestations; spray chemical pest control solutions.
  12. Replace light bulbs, lighting and illumination fixtures and systems – interior/exterior.
  13. Repair, or remove and replace door key card systems.
  14. Patch/repair, or remove and replace swimming pool skirt tiles.
  15. Perform landscape work; replace mulch, chips, edgings, stones, etc.
  16. Repair, or replace wood decking, steps, rails, banisters, seating, signage.
  17. Repair, or replace roof tiles, shingles; also building fascia, gutters, downspouts, etc.
  18. Repair, or replace landscaping brick, stone; also walkways.
  19. Pressure wash sidewalks, also exterior corridor areas, walls, fencing, etc.
  20. Help repair, or replace any mechanical systems on property.

 

Facility Painter’s Short List of “Other Things to Do”

(Eg. Hospitals, ALFs; corporate headquarters, government properties, universities, malls.)

 

  1. Replace ceramic floor tiles and trim.
  2. Replace acoustical ceiling tiles, also panels and gridwork.
  3. Repair walls; replace baseboards, trim, doors and frames, etc.
  4. Lubricate door locks and hinges.
  5. Replace air conditioner filters
  6. Repair carpeting and carpet tiles.
  7. Caulk restroom areas.
  8. Repair water damaged ceilings, walls, etc.
  9. Clean glass.
  10. Clean A/C units; make minor repairs to HVAC systems.
  11. Replace light bulbs, fixtures, interior/exterior illumination systems, etc.
  12. Repair, or replace cabinetry, countertops, shelving units, etc.

 

BOTTOM LINE: As a hotel or facility painter, you want to be prepared to step in and resolve either physical or aesthetic problems in any interior or exterior area on the property.

 

Also, you want to feel comfortable using whatever products, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment that are needed to get the job done right. Also, promptly and cost-effectively.

 

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Often, persons are judged by the “other things” they do, not only by doing their job as described.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: The Fast and Easy Way

Just to clarify things: Easy and fast is not necessarily the most recommended way to paint something. However, for everyone, we sometimes want things to go a little easier or to happen a little quicker.

 

Painting is no different. By taking some precautions, we can guarantee some degree of quality, no matter how fast or easy the work is. Having the right amount of skill is usually the ticket.

 

There are any number of items that can be painted the easy way, and as fast as you might want to complete them. Example: Using an airless spray system, I once prime finished just under 3000 linear feet of molding in less than an hour. When calculated using a brush and/or roller, it would have taken the entire day. Yes, a high level of productivity can be achieved daily, depending on the situation.

 

A FEW PREP-LEVEL TIPS

 

  1. Make an assessment of the project.
  2. Determine the steps needed to complete the project. The general rule is: The fewer steps there are, the easier it will be to complete. And, you will be finished in no time.
  3. Next, evaluate how difficult it will be to complete each step. Example: To paint a louvered door, you must (a) sand each piece of wood or metal as the case may be, (b) dust the surface, and (c) apply the paint using your chosen method. Here, the process of sanding can slow the paint process down quite a bit. It would be no big deal, if all you had to do was paint it.

 

So, how can you make a job easy, or develop a faster way of doing it? Let’s take the easy part of it first. You might want to follow the steps below.

 

  1. Answer this question: What is the largest size brush to use for painting this surface? A 1-inch brush is used for detail and glass framework. A 4-inch brush is used for flat, open wall areas and wide trim such as crown molding. Determine which one’s best suited for you and the job.

 

  1. When selecting a roller system: Relate the viscosity of the paint to the type of surface. Applying paint with a roller is easiest if the paint spreads smoothly, and you don’t have to dip the roller every five seconds. Example: Use a 3/8 inch roller cover when painting brick or concrete block. And, you will fight it the entire time.

 

  1. What can be easier than using a spray gun? Assess the surface and which spray tip is the most appropriate to apply the paint evenly. For those of you familiar with tip sizes, a 3-11 is best suited for trim painting and multiple small objects. It is possible to work yourself to death painting large wall spaces with a small tip. Recommendation: A 4-17 or 5-21 are the optimum choices here.

 

 Now: How can you paint this faster than, say, the last time? Think: Spray it!

 

A well-seasoned painter, with comprehensive knowledge in spray painting, will know intuitively how to get the most out of his spray work. Here are several things that he or she might bring to the attention of a less experienced painter.

 

  1. Completely strain the paint prior to siphoning or pressurizing. This step cannot be stressed enough.
  2. Make sure that all system filters are clean. Replace at regular intervals.
  3. Make sure the spray tip is not worn, and does not leak as you trigger the gun.
  4. Assess hourly use of each spray tip per manufacturer recommendations with type of paint.
  5. Thin paint or coating material to the proper viscosity NOTE: This will increase ease of paint flow and pumping efficiency.
  6. At all times, maintain a posture and spray gun motion which is perpendicular to the surface. 7. Cover everything within close proximity to the work that does not get painted. Use plastic sheeting, paper and drop cloths.
  7. Use a mask as necessary – one appropriate for the product, space, exposure, ventilation, etc.

 

How to Optimize Ease and Speed in Unison

 

Normally, I would consider it difficult to work fast and for the work to be easy at the same time. It takes some concentration to achieve what you’re looking for. There a few things you can do.

 

  1. Spray finish as much as possible before having to bring out the roller and brush. Your productivity will be considerably higher; and the hand tool use won’t have worn you out.

 

  1. Use a roller system in place of where you typically would have used a brush.

 

  1. Upgrade or vary the brush size from what you would normally use.

 

  1. Provide the highest level of surface preparation available.

 

To make a paint job easier, it is not necessary to cut corners or costs. Ease comes with experience: knowing how to complete a task using a sound and simple method versus getting too involved.

 

Start simple and build from there. Example: Don’t try to strip wood without using a chemical remover.

 

Fast means: You will be done sooner and generally make more money. Just don’t sacrifice quality and end up back where you started: behind schedule.

 

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I hope that you enjoyed your Thanksgiving holiday. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob,”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Painter’s World: Visiting Old Projects, Old Properties

It can be very interesting, and motivating, to visit hotel, resort and other properties where you’ve completed projects in the past. Or where you were a staff painter.

 

You may look at your previous project work through different eyes. The eyes of more experience. This is particularly true with completed projects. Or, similar projects on which you used better products or more effective methods, and achieved better results than before.

 

Two of my friends from IUPAT days have turned this experience into a “painter’s” destination. They stay as guests at a hotel or resort on which they’ve worked. They reserve a large room for a minimum of a 3-day weekend, to a maximum of ten days.  (Depending on the amount of work they did on the respective property.)

 

Here’s what they look at while staying at each hotel or resort.

 

  1. Current overall color scheme of hotel/resort – predominant colors used and where.
  2. Surfaces/areas repainted or redecorated since they worked on property – including products and colors used.
  3. Surfaces/areas that have not been redone since they worked on them – including products and colors they used.
  4. Special designs, finishes and effects used now, that weren’t used back then. Changes made that painter recommended before, but management turned down.
  5. New designs, products, finishes, colors, etc. used now that are much more appealing and effective than those the painter(s) needed to use when there.
  6. Areas and amenities remodeled or upgraded since they worked on the property – including paint, finishing and wallcovering treatments used.

 

Actually, their destination checklist number over eleven. Also, within twenty-four hours of their arrival at the hotel or resort, they made a point of introducing themselves to the chief engineer, also the general manager of the property.

 

“We keep everything above board. We tell them who we are, and why we’re there. Besides the overnight stay, of course.  We tell them that we are painters, what we do specifically, and when we worked on the property, or as a staff member.”

 

They ask permission to walk around, and look at areas that they worked on. They make notes about problem surfaces and projects back when, and the better ways they would handle them today.

 

The two painters – with 56 years hospitality painting experience between them – have developed their own learning curve. They’ve created and produced DVD tutorials – problem-solution how-tos – to share with other career hotel/resort painters and engineering department teammates.

 

Hats off to Trent and Carlos.

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Learning from our past often requires awareness of our presence.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

A True Antique Story: Pub Back Bars and Front Bars

Greek immigrant and saloon owner, Mr. Bates, owned the largest, l-shaped parcel of land that surrounded our wooded property. On the land set a gold mine of Sothby’s-quality antiques.

 

Some pieces set inside and under the vacant, dilapidated cabin in the dense woods adjoining ours. Some were hidden inside the tunnel of an underground bomb cavern.

 

Most of the antiques were crammed into the two huge boxcars. Both set in an untilled field, camouflaged by a dense overgrowth. Located less than one thousand feet from our fence line.

 

The cabin site housed dozens of wooden cigar boxes. They were filled with old currency from the U. S., Greece, British Isles, etc. Some boxes were stuffed with matured U. S. Savings Bonds – over one hundred of them.

 

Ceramic, porcelain and earthenware dishes, pots, pitchers, vases, and trays set on the floors in both rooms. Also, many old pieces of flatware: sterling silver, silver-plated, gold-plated.

 

Old saloon and bar furnishings filled the boxcars. That included three complete bar sets; fixtures, mirrors, picture frames, wall mural panels, etc. Also china, crystal, glassware, and cooking accessories.

 

One boxcar contained eight or nine rolled up imported oriental rugs. And, over six wooden crates of fine tapestry.

 

The other one housed two complete front and back bar systems. Both were constructed of rich, solid mahogany, and similar in design. Each back bar measured at least 21 feet in length, and 17 feet in height.

 

The Back Bars featured inset twin beveled mirrors, fluted columns, intricate relief carvings, and built-in drawers. Also, small cupboards and three glass cases. Both were appointed with brass trim, hardware and railings. One unit included built-in steps to reach those higher areas.

 

The Front Bars of both sets featured a brass beer drain board and a polished counter top. And, each included brass boot rests/bars.

 

Over the years, the heavy key locks on each boxcar were broken or cut off repeatedly by thieves, or “snoops.” Little was ever taken. Perhaps because most of the pieces were so cumbersome. And unusable somewhere other than inside a bar or pub. Or, a huge residence, or museum.

 

At some point, the attorney for the elderly property owner engaged our closest neighbor and us to keep a close eye on the property. And, its contents. We were “enlisted” to watch out for all trespassers. (A little more about that follows.)

 

The hardest part of that job was spotting the intruders that snuck onto the wooded section. First, they had to slip or sneak through our woods. And, the entire wooded area was unusually dense, even in the winter. Also, hunters wandered – trespassed – onto the back of our property, then onto the neighbors.

 

Another problem: Some of the intruders were the grown nephews and families of old Mr. Bates. And, reliable sources had informed us that the three nephews eagerly awaited their inheritances.

 

But, a funny thing happened as their greed grew. The owner set up an interesting system of trusts for his entire, massive estate.

 

The nephews would receive access to the estate only after the youngest child of any nephew reached eighteen. And, at the time of the owner’s death, the youngest child in the group was under age one.

 

By the time Mr. Bates said his earthly goodbyes, his attorney faced a much easier job of settling the estate.

 

The elderly owner had already sold off most of his real estate in town, including the saloon. Nearly all of the antiques had been lifted from the boxcars. The cabin and underground cavern had been looted, and fallen apart from gross neglect. (Too, the most forceful nephew had died of a heart attack.)

 

Even at the end, our family possessed special access to the Bates tales. From school days, my father knew the attorney. And, my mother and the attorney’s wife belonged to the same philanthropic sorority, Tri Kappa.

 

Still, I was not prepared for the trivia that hit my e-mail Inbox last week. One of the “authorized looters” of those boxcars was a young Greek bar owner in South Florida. The furnishings that he had lifted were shipped to Florida, and set into his family’s pub in the early 1990s.

 

Today, that pub is owned and operated by his two Baby Boomer sons, and their adult children.

 

Thanks, Mr. Bates. What a fantastic idea for the plot of a mystery novel!

 

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Own your day, and value its contents.  rdh

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Hotel Painting with Bob: 2016 and Beyond

Out with the old,  and in with the new!

 

Welcome, everyone, to a new year of painting projects.
 

 

YEAR 2016 can be viewed in all sorts of new and fascinating ways.

 

If you haven’t done so in the past, let your creativity flow. Generate new ideas for decorating your living spaces and your businesses.

 

WHY? And, is it within our budget?

 

You can “THINK BIG,” yet start small, if you wish. Or, you can treat it – any new or upgrading project – as an investment for the future.

 

Painting and decorating has been around for a long time. Even the Egyptians adorned their buildings with vivid colors and figurative designs. They expressed themselves to demonstrate the value they placed on their way of life.

 

You, too, can “express the best” that your hotel or resort stands for! 

 

Repaint the walls of your lobby, public restrooms, guest rooms/suites or villas, etc. in colors which express your hotel or resort’s inner spirit – and attitude toward life. And, your guests!

 

Refinish pieces of furniture to renew their value. To give them a big lift!

 

Texture and/or Faux Finish a ceiling to create depth and variety in the surface appeal.

 

Spray finish exterior furniture to create a fresh, inviting, and durable look. You can even apply a decorative finish for a traditional or classic appeal.

 

What you can keep in mind is this:

 

Whatever “environment” you are thinking about painting or refinishing, let your creativity be your guide. Just go for it!

 

Don’t hold back.

 

And, if you are in doubt as to the right procedure to follow? Seek a certified, journey-level painter and decorator to help you out. Someone more experienced than you. Someone with a more extensive background in an area that you want to tackle.

 

Or, just go for it! And, paint it for yourself.

 

Either way, the outcome will revive your property. And, rejuvenate you, too.
Let the use of paint, color, and texture inspire you. Excite you. Lift you. Challenge you. Renew you.

 

HAVE A FRUITFUL NEW YEAR, EVERYONE!

 

And, remember:

 

No painting project is too small, if you see it will add joy to the lives of teammates and managers, guests and visitors. No painting project is too small, if you see it will add joy to your life. Both on and off the job!

 

Robert “Bob” Hajtovik

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Thanks for visiting ” Painting with Bob,” a painting blog with spirit.

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

PAINTING THINGS FOR SMOKEY THE BEARS

SmokeyBears
Since childhood, I’ve been collecting “Smokey the Bear” stuffed animals. The collection includes two first editions. One made in the late 1960s, the other in the early 1970s.

 

All except two of the forest ranger bears were manufactured by Knickerbocher in New York, New York.

 

Over the years, the “Smokeys” received treatment deserving of such “naturalists.” They had their own custom-designed furniture, crafted from oak and pine woods.

 

. Park bench – 20-inches high by 36-inches long by 8-inches deep.

Description: Painted forest green, semi-gloss latex, Mfgr,: Sherwin-Williams; “Smokey” belt buckle etching on front cross-brace of back, 50 percent grey matte acrylic, Mfgr.: Liquitex.

 

. Side chair – 18-inches high by 10-inches wide by 8-inches deep.

Description: Clear primer/sealer, low-gloss clear polyurethane finish, Mfgr.: Minwax. Carved poinsettia back panel, painted crimson red and tinted forest green acrylic, Mfgr.: Liquitex.

 

. Bunk bed – 21-inches long by 12-inches wide by 18-inches high.

Description: Mattresses, posts painted Bright white semi-gloss latex; Mfgr.: Sherwin-Williams. Curved headboards, painted light bark brown background, with the “Smokey” logo name painted custom-tinted blue-grey acrylic; Mfgr.: Liquitex.

 

Young neighbor children liked to play “gently” with a few of the “Smokeys,” while their mothers stopped by to discuss a problem with someone.

 

Most of the Smokey the Bears sit safely, in a display wall cabinet.

 

On Halloween, “Smokey No. 7”, a custom designed, handcrafted 36-inch high model, sits in a white captain’s chair at the front door. Holding a large aluminum bowl of trick-or-treat candy in his lap. Even the teenagers grin, when they see “Smokey,” and they help themselves to two or three snack-sized candy bars.

 

In December of 2014, six of my “Smokey the Bears” were donated to Goodwill Industries for a fundraiser. They were clear-wrap sealed in pairs, to generate higher prices.

 

A running search on e-Bay and Google+ for another original edition of “Smokey the Bear” is checked at least monthly. Like with any collectible, the “Smokeys” turn up some interesting people. And stories.

 

My most recently purchased “Smokey,” circa 1975, came from the Los Angeles area. A lady who was once in the film industry. I’m waiting for a “Smokey” to arrive from California. Given as a birthday gift to a gold record musician, the 1972 bear is being given as a birthday gift to me.

 

Per agreement with the seller, this “Smokey the Bear” will remain with the rest of the group here. And, the entire group will be donated to a Central Indiana community’s local historical museum. “When the time comes…”

 

Bears, it may be time to build a bigger park bench.

 

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“Only you can prevent forest fires.”     “Only you can prevent wildfires.”

                                                                                                                  …. “Smokey the Bear”

Note: Smoke the Bear is the trademark property of the National Park Service.

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Have a safe September, everyone. And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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