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Posts tagged ‘patterns’

Designing with Graphics Using Wallcoverings

 

Rainbow Farm in Vinyl

Blue Sphere

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Various types of wall covering can be applied to achieve part or all of your chosen graphic design. The possibilities are endless because a very wide selection is available.

 

About “Rainbow Farm in Vinyl”: Graphic design covers two adjacent corner walls. Overall dimensions: 42 feet length by 9 feet height. Design features abstract symbols of a modern recreation farm: buildings and structures, flowers and gardens, fields with lush crops, animals, Christmas tree nursery, vehicles. Templated symbols were cut from commercial-grade vinyls. The variety of colorful and textured remnants came from two large elementary school projects.

 

About “Blue Sphere”: Graphics free-form stripe wraps around two adjacent walls, trailing into a large walk-in closet. Overall dimensions: 12 feet-to-8 feet-to-9 feet length by 8 feet-to-6 feet height. Design features one graduated, 12-inch to 8-inch horizontal stripe. Free-style form was cut from mini-pebble textured commercial vinyl, spliced into already-installed off-white decorative stone-textured ceiling-to-floor commercial vinyl.

 

The layout is similar to the painting process. The work can be compared to doing a puzzle.

 

Before you can install the wallcovering, many pieces of various sizes and shape will have to be fashioned.

 

Each separate piece will need to be pasted with the appropriate adhesive or paste. NOTE: Some will require vinyl paste while others may need wheat or cellulose.

 

The following process is meant for the skilled paperhanger.

 

CREATING TEMPLATES FOR WALLCOVERING PIECES

 

1. Create a paper sketch of wall area.

 

2. Sketch in your design to scale.

 

3. Use grid paper, or graphic software program. Example: 1 inch = 1 foot.

A. Number each piece within design.

B. Use larger grid paper to transfer shapes to full-size.

C. Gridded architectural or engineering paper works great for this.

D. Be certain to number each piece to correspond to piece’s number in sketch.

 

INSTALLING/APPLYING WALLCOVERING PIECES INTO GRAPHIC DESIGN

 

1. To apply wallcovering to stripe areas, pre-trim pieces on zinc strip to fit.

 

2. Then, paste material. Be sure to use the paste/adhesive appropriate for that piece.

 

TIP: I’ve used small, neon-colored sticky notes to “label” front of each piece. Here’s how:

On 8 ½ inch by 14 inch paper, I’ve made a chart. I glued tiny sample of each type of wallcovering to be used. Next, I wrote the type of paste/adhesive to be used for that type of covering. Then, I assigned a neon color sticky note to each type, and adhered one alongside the corresponding wallcovering sample.

 

3. Butt (align) the seams of the pieces and smooth out wallcovering.

 

4. When several pieces are fitted, use a straight edge and razor knife to trim excess to even out any edge or seam joint. Much patience is needed here.

 

5. Where irregular sized and shaped pieces are to fit irregular sized and shaped pieces, I recommend one or both of the following methods:

 

  1. Method 1: Pre-cut each piece.
  2. Match each piece to a template, before adhering to wall with paste/adhesive.
  3. Several pieces, that will adjoin each other, can be trimmed and matched together at the paste table before applying.

 

  1. Method 2: Overlap the seams of adjoining pieces.
  2. Double-cut through the two layers.
  3. With straight lines, trimming is easy.

 

TIP 1: When making curved or arched cuts, always make up plastic templates that precisely match the curvature of the penciled line. Normally, you will need only a half dozen to allow for the making of your other cuts.

 

TIP 2: Change your razor blades more regularly.

 

6. Smooth all wall covering in multiple directions to remove creases and bubbles.

 

7. Using a seam roller, press down all seams and edges.

 

8. Use just enough pressure to adhere the wallcovering piece to the substrate.

 

9. Work quickly while ensuring a perfect job.

 

10. Wash the seam roller as needed.

 

TIP: In some instances, it is invaluable to use special seam glue and a heat gun to manipulate the material more precisely.

 

Remember: All wall coverings are not applied using the same method.

 

TIP: If various types of coverings are used, be ready to work with each one a little differently to fit each piece of the graphics together.

 

A large graphic design project . . .

 

On one occasion, I applied a vinyl graphics design in a corridor over one hundred and fifty feet long. It turned out magnificent in the end. However, it was difficult to achieve. The entire length of the hallway set on a slope. And the stripes and curves, that made up the design, were at eye level.

 

When doing graphics using wallcovering, both patience and precision are required to achieve favorable results.

 

And remember: Create a sample first!

 

Footnote: Fortunately, creating great graphics using wallcoverings is a breeze, compared to trying to transfer media files into this post. Any tips from anyone?  Thanks in advance!

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.” Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Painting It: Hotel Teen Center & Computer Room

BASIC FEATURES and AMENITIES of TYPICAL TEEN CENTER/ROOM/AREA

 

  1. Carpeting or carpet tiles: Dense weave, darker solid colors or patterned, bright color accents.
  2. Walls: Painted and/or commercial wall vinyl; darker shades, bright color accents.
  3. Windows: Unobstructed view of outdoors; windows overlooking hallway; no windows.
  4. Entrance: Often open, and no doors. Any doors may be wood, or vinyl-coated.
  5. Computer area: Washable/durable surfaces: countertops, height-appropriate chairs/stools.
  6. Seating: Bean bag chairs. Upholstery: vinyl/fabric; heavy-duty, stain and water resistant.
  7. Other furniture: Café booth(s) with benches (bolted down); couch, arm chairs; work table.
  8. Lighting: Recessed lighting, fixtures for reading/close-up work; workstation lighting.

 

COLORS THAT TEENS WANT

 

Note: Bright anything tends to be first choice. With older teens, dark colors are popular, too.

 

  1. Main colors: Dark colors – eg. black, gray, forest green, purple – on the walls.
  2. Accent colors: Red, hot pink/fuscia, purple, lime, orange, bright blues,
  3. Ceiling color(s): Multiple colors – light-to-dark; bright colors. Not solid whites, or pastels.

 

“CREATE WITH” SPECIAL EFFECTS THAT TEENS LIKE

 

  1. Create with paint: Murals and graphics. Interactive and erasable mural wall, on which teen guests/patients/visitors can add-to – eg. drawings, illustrations, cartoons, caricatures, graphics, scenics. Multi-designed mural in black and shades of gray. Faux layer-on-layers; reflective looks; subtle images.
  2.  Create with wallcoverings: Textured with bright colors; cosmic, galactic, luminaries; graphics and geometrics in bright colors.
  3. Create with carpeting/carpet tiles: Multi-colored; solids, stripes, colorful patterns in carpet.

Fun/game/hot spots. F.Y.I: “Game Room Fun” blog, posted January 20, 2015.

  1. Create with wood: Faux design simulating wood; multi-colored painted or stained wood.
  2.  Create with wallboard/fiberboard: Multi-layered in puzzle pieces, various colors, one wall.
  3. Create with other materials: Cork block and vertical panel bulletin boards. TIP: Alternate with adjacent painted panels. Colorful fabrics on walls; bright colored trims, moldings.

IDEA: Create Amazon rain forest atmosphere. On one wall painted muted tropical green, clip/staple simulated or real bamboo stalks. Carpet entire/part of room in variegated green tiles. Create jungle “path.”

  1. Create with lighting/fixtures: Track lighting, using various colored bulbs; spotlights; globes.

 

COMBINING COLORS, PATTERNS, TEXTURES, GRAPHICS, ETC.

 

  1. Patterns: Overlap stencils with bright colors, 3-dimensional transparent designs.
  2. Textures: Multi-colors to form design on wall. TIP: Various shades and tones of one color.
  3. Graphics: Geometrics hand-painted, or done with wallcoverings (eg. remnant commercial weight vinyls). Texting acronyms, words, phrases painted in curved lines/arches. Symbols.
  4.  Scenics: Hand-painted animated scenes, wallcoverings of real-life nature scenes – eg. islands.
  5. Murals: Teen-involved paintings – eg. street scenes, dance club, optical illusions.
  6. Overlays: Wallcovering over freshly-painted surface – eg. Collages, facsimiles of photo-op frames. Adhesive-backed carpet tile shapes for walls, wide arches, columns, cabinetry headers.

 

 

VERY TECHY-FRIENDLY!

 

Features: No-glare surfaces, finishes, lighting, etc. Flexible-use spots. Space-y workstation areas. Movable, durable seating. Smooth material, sturdy, washable upholstery. Open-space feeling, forget doors.

 

CREATING CLUSTER FUN and HOT-SPOTS

 

  1. Games space: Create a system of modular spaces (non-painted) – laminate and solid wood – with interchangeable sections.
  2. Eating/snacking space: Informal; vinyl-covered bar stools, smooth flooring for easy cleaning.
  3. WI-FI/Computer station space: Opportunities here limited only by budget, really.
  4. Groupie/congregate space: Create communal space, where everyone can see each other.
  5. Dancing/Music space: Crate a dance floor, using a design such as geometric wood inlays.
  6. Reading/study/project space: Modular design, open space for circular tables.

 

 

Teens like lots of freedom! Including in spaces they use at the hotel or resort where they are staying overnight. Give them that space. Invite their creative souls. And, they’ll love your hotel, and your staff.
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Thanks, everyone, for keeping in touch – and for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: How to Apply a Custom Texture

A texture can be applied anywhere that paint can. However, the skills and techniques needed much more specialized.

 

“Texture” refers to a surface profile, which is “other than smooth.” That means there are literally thousands of variations that can be achieved. And part of that variation is a vast number of products and methods, available for obtaining the desired results.

 

FIRST STEP.

 

Decide what type of custom design and/or consistency you would like your surface to have.

 

A short list of custom finishes and the materials used with them:

 

  1. Venetian Plaster – plaster mix, joint compound.

 

  1. Crows foot – joint compound, premixed drywall compound.

 

  1. Random Trowel – joint compound, plaster mix, premixed drywall compound.

 

  1.  Impasto – premixed drywall compound, plaster mix, modeling paste.

 

  1. Crossed Weave – premixed drywall compound, joint compound.

 

In selecting the “Random Trowel method,” a certain basic procedure needs to be followed in order to achieve the desired effect.

 

SECOND STEP.

 

Make sure the surface you have chosen is generally smooth, dry and porous. (The compound will adhere well). I do not recommend texturing a surface that has a sheen greater than eggshell.

 

In texturing a surface, which has a gloss, the surface will normally end up with popping and loosening of the texture. I wouldn’t go that route. To begin with skimming a ceiling using a broad knife and joint compound is an excellent way of creating uniformity.

 

THIRD STEP.

 

Mix the compound to the desired thickness. And make a sample board. Assemble an assortment of drywall broad knives 6-to-14 inches.

 

Mix approximately ½ gallon, in which the compound is medium to heavy bodied. If the compound sticks to a broad knife held upside down, and doesn’t fall off, that’s a little too thick.

 

Experiment. Test different mixtures till you are satisfied with the consistency.

 

To make a sample board.

 

Use a 1-foot by 1-foot, or 2-foot by 2-foot pressed wood sheet. Experiment with applying the texture in different ways.

 

Try to “establish a pattern.” If you don’t like the result, scrape off the board. Give it another try. This is just practice for applying the real thing.

 

A person must get familiar with holding the broad knife and manipulating the compound. It’s the best way to create a texture you will be happy with in the end.

 

STEP FOUR.

 

Having established a technique, you should be able to apply the Random Trowel Method.

 

Select the appropriate knife. Have about one-half gallon of the compound mixed and ready.

 

Begin in the farthest corner of the surface area. If it is a wall, start in the upper left-hand corner. If it’s a ceiling, start at the far left corner. Work yourself out from there.

 

Place compound on the knife. Spread it out. Use a motion which places heavier pressure on the knife. Then, gradually release that pressure. This will create a texture with a rise or slope, similar to that of a wave.

 

THE KEY:

 

Now, overlap the motions with your broad knife, so that the sloping texture is not heading in one direction. Optimally, you’re shooting for a randomized pattern with high and low areas. You want to create a varied degree of ridges. Some will be sharper; others will be smoother.

 

Remember: The finish is not permanent, as long as it has not hardened. Wipe it off. And start again, if you need to do so.

 

A texture is an extension of creativity, especially when decorating living and working spaces.

 

Are you interested in textured surfaces, and their unique appearance? Then, consider all of the variations available.

 

Also, there are some amazing artisans out there. Engage one that can design something for you beyond your imagination. All that you might be left to do is choose a color.

 

TRENDY TIPS:

 

1. Combine different textures, using the same palette color.

2. Apply one layer/design very smooth, the other nubby, or ridged.

3. Try overlays. Apply the same texture and palette color; one layer horizontal, the other vertical.

4. Simulate fur, velvet or leather. Bark or cork.

 

The possibilities are endless.

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See you at the paint store! Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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