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Posts tagged ‘replacements’

Painting It: Keeping That Hotel Renovation Beautiful!

Once a renovation is completed, what must be done to protect its condition on a continual basis?

 

Generally speaking, consider how you treat your home. You may have fine furnishings, ornate architecture or highly decorative surfaces. One needs only to remember that all things suffer wear, and are subject to age.

 

Specifically, anything which is maintained regularly and by using consistent methods will stand the test of time longer. And, of course, more attention means more expenditure.

 

Are you willing and able, including budget-wise, to do what is required to sustain the look of refinement? If not, a room or property can easily become a dereliction of one’s duties.

 

Methods for maintaining that new and improved renovation:

 

* Clean all surfaces regularly to prevent dirt build up.

 

* Install automated room deodorizer. Some are designed with portability in mind.

 

* Apply a liquid polish to all clear finished wood surfaces including moldings, doors and

furniture.

 

* Touch up paint on surfaces using a small brush or touch up roller. Keep the touch-up

areas as small as possible.

 

* Repair damage to a surface using a method that will best duplicate or match the existing

surface. Great detail should be paid to surfaces which require a precise match.

Example: Stippled surfaces, reflective surfaces, textured surface, and surfaces with a

noticeable sheen.

 

* Keep decorative surfaces clean, and unexposed to the UV rays of the sun. This is essential

for maximizing the longevity of the surface’s good condition.

 

* Apply a clear coat application, for the ultimate in painted surface protection. It has been

proven to add years of service to hotel surfaces.

 

* Replace anything which cannot be repaired in a reasonable amount of time and effort.

This is the final resort, and the most expensive.

Example: A broken armrest on a chair may be repairable. But will it look as though it was

not?

 

A restoration takes a great deal of time to complete. There are steps and procedures involved. If ignored, they will show up in the results as carelessness, or a willingness to cut corners where you shouldn’t have.

 

The same dedication should be given to maintaining what was created initially. For, if it is not, in a very short time, the hotel’s reputation and reliability could suffer – and become questionable.

 

And, I don’t need to tell any of you what that means!

 

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Painting In: Company Policy, Common Sense and Common Courtesy: Part 1

Scenario:
A person – let’s say a painter – leaves his or her employment with a company.

 

Whatever the circumstance, it is standard company policy for any former employee to separate physically from the business, organization, people there, and property.

 

It is standard company policy that a former employee not return onto the property except:

 

  1. for a business reason that requires their physical return;
  2. for an occasional, brief visit – one to two times a year maximum;
  3. by invitation – eg. for a departmental party or cook-out;
  4. to “apply in person” for a job opening;
  5. for a job interview;
  6. to return – a rehire – to work there.

 

 

By the way, any and all returns should be cleared, in advance, with the hotel or facility general manager, or front office. That’s called “respect” or “common courtesy.”

 

It is common sense for a former employee to stay away from the business, organization and people. That gives everyone involved the time and space needed to:

 

  1. yes, mourn the departed employee’s loss;
  2. accept the person’s absence from the team, and the group; and
  3. adjust to the changes necessary because of the person’s departure from the organization.

 

It is common courtesy for a former employee to remain off the property, and away from the organization, except for any of the six reasons given above. This gives the replacement the best opportunity possible to assimilate into his or her new position.

 

He or she needs, and deserves, the opportunity to succeed. The replacement – new employee – has a job to do there.

 

  1. He or she needs to learn the ropes within the department, also interdepartmentally and organizationally.
  2. He or she needs to adjust and tweak his or her skills, abilities and resources to meet the unique needs of the new property – and employer.
  3. He or she needs to be welcomed properly by his new teammates and bosses.
  4. He or she needs to find his or her place on the team, and how to fit in!
  5. He or she needs to establish a reliable communication and negotiation system with his or her supervisor, other department directors, and managers.
  6. He or she needs to build teammate relationships and organizational friendships – at all levels – that are mutually beneficial, supportive and gratifying.
  7. He or she needs to find unique ways to contribute to the organization and the business.
  8. He or she needs to participate in and belong to the company family.

 

 

When a former employee stays off the property, and stays separated from the company, he or she benefits, too. He or she has the best opportunity to succeed autonomously.

 

  1. He or she can mourn the job loss, with the attention and respect it deserves.
  2. He or she can look back and gain a clear perspective of his or her total employment experience – and work life – there.
  3. He or she can reflect, objectively and subjectively, on past achievements, contributions and also unmet goals.
  4. He or she can rest in the present, and both assess and appreciate his current skills and abilities, accrued knowledge, creative talents, aspirations, and place in the world of employability.
  5. He or she can plan for the future. The person can create a plan that (a) respects that person’s work ethic and set of values; (b) offers opportunities for changes, growth and doing well; and (c) fulfills the greater need to feel like the person fits in and belongs, contributes, and can do more good.

 

When my grandfather retired from the ministry, he left a parish where he and my grandmother were totally respected, and deeply loved. In leaving, he announced to the consistory and congregation that he and Grandmother would be “staying away” from the church parish for one full year. Why?

 

“To give the new man a chance,” he explained to everyone concerned. (And, others that asked!)

 

Grandfather knew that it would be a major challenge for the successor to fill his pastoral shoes. He knew that it would be a bigger challenge for “the new man” to establish his own place – his own identity – in the church and in the community. To fit in and to belong!

 

Grandfather kept his pledge, and promise. Yes, he and Grandmother maintained their closest personal friendships with a few individuals and couples in the church. (They had retired there, their home community for over 25 years.)

 

Still, they refrained from having any communications and activities that may have, even indirectly, made “life uncomfortable and difficult for the new man.”

 

As a result, the new man sought Grandfather’s counsel on a regular basis. And, the two clergy became trusted friends, strong supporters of each other, and professional confidantes.

 

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POINTS TO PONDER:

1. Have you ever been a “former employee?” Did you follow standard company policy after your departure?

2. Did you exercise common sense about your former employer, teammates/coworkers, and organization – and their circumstance?

3. Did you practice common courtesy toward your former teammates/coworkers, former managers, and former employer, as well as your replacement?

4. Have you ever been working where and when a former employee showed up repeatedly on the property?  For years? How did you handle the situation each time?

5. How well was the company policy, including security rules, followed by all current employees and managers, including you? By the former employee? By the business owners?

 

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“In the long haul, it pays to follow company policy, exercise common sense, and practice common courtesy – and help others do the same.”

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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