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Posts tagged ‘revitalizing’

Getting Unemployed Properties “Back to Work” – Part 2

Recently, I heard of a group of five entrepreneurs that save smaller properties, like the three men did in the Midwest. (See “Getting Unemployed Properties, Part 1.)

 

This group purchases abandoned smaller schools, rehabilitation facilities, hotels, and churches. Then, they remodel and retrofit each property to fill a specific voice in its respective community. “Usually, within a 25-mile radius.”

 

A few examples:

 

  1. One-story elementary school, north central Florida, converted into a residential facility for moderately-to-severely handicapped teens and adults.

 

  1. One-story private elementary school, in northwest Florida, turned into a non-denominational assisted living facility for low-income persons.

 

  1. Two-story hotel, in southeast Georgia, transformed into low-income rental “villas.”

 

  1. 100-room hotel, in north central Florida, retrofitted as an assisted living facility, complete with ADA-compliant pool and spa.

 

  1. One-story high school, turned into short-term rehabilitation center and permanent ALF for handicapped military veterans.

 

  1. Small church and adjoining education building, remodeled as a year-round community center.

 

Within the last five years, the group has purchased, then helped “revitalize and recycle” over 15 properties. Two persons in the group are brothers.

 

One is a cardiovascular physician and surgeon, that co-finances the group’s “property rescue projects.” The other brother is a journey-level painter, that specializes in remodeling, renovating, and retrofitting what he calls “people-public properties.”

 

The painter in the group e-mailed me about his role in getting some of these properties “back to work.”

 

“Usually, I work as both the foreman and line painter on a crew of five commercial painters. My project work can be divided into eight phases.

 

  1. Surface/area assessment – conditions and needs.
  2. Product and color estimating, selecting and ordering.
  3. Tool and equipment selecting, purchasing or renting, and keeping track of.
  4. Work area set-ups and scheduling.
  5. Painter assignments and outfitting.
  6. Painting with the rest of the crew.
  7. Troubleshooting and punch lists.
  8. Cooperating with inspectors and sign-off people.

 

“My work is time sensitive… labor and ability intensive. We rely a lot on each other. Across trade lines…. A big, learning experience for me. On every project…”

 

“The painters’ job on these projects is not to restore the surfaces to their pristine, original condition. It’s not to deal with style-conscious interior designers. And, forget trying to please the owners and investors 100 percent. (This group doesn’t expect that.) We don’t have any of them on these projects.

 

“We’re all here with the same dream: To get the property back to good use. No egos here.”

 

He closed with this motivating message…

 

“Practically anyone can do this. Pull together a few friends and relatives. Pool your brains, money and abilities. Save one building. Help some decent people in your own community.”

 

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“Charity begins where we’re working. Where we’re standing.” rdh

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved

Painting Them: Restoring and Reviving Hotels

Every staff member saw the hotel “looking better than it had in years.” “Since it had been built,” said a longtime employee.

 

What does it take to restore a hotel?

 

  1. A solid yet flexible plan, highly-skilled craft persons, time, and a large budget.
  2. Usually more resources than many property owners have, or want to commit.

 

What needs to be done to revive a hotel property?

 

As much as the budget will allow.

 

REVIVING A HOTEL

 

Tips from a painter that’s been there, done that. On more than seven hotel properties.

 

1. Start with the most obvious areas – noticeable to the guests and visitors.

A. Guest rooms

B. Lobby(ies)

 

Clean all areas. Touch up paint. Or “full-paint” areas to create a fresh look. A change of color, or design and placement, can be uplifting. A big benefit.

 

2. Cover the essentials.

A. Safety zones

B. High-traffic areas

C. Pools and spas – especially in hotter, humid and sunny climates

 

3. Repair – take care of – the most neglected areas.

A. High-wear areas may require weekly attention.

B. Always post “WET PAINT” signs when painting in high-traffic areas.

C. Look for permanent repair solutions for areas that receive repetitious damage or wear.

Example: Place plastic guards over corners in high-traffic areas such as a lobby.

 

4. “Clean up all of those old messes, the best you can.”

A. Cover anything that is not to be painted, located close to the work area.

B. A final vacuum of the area completes the job.

 

5. Revitalize the higher ticket areas. Get them “back on the market.”

A. Conference centers

B. Restaurants

C. Food courts

D. Gift Shops

 

6. Liven up the most popular spots.

A. Game rooms

B. WI-FI and VIRTUAL SPOTS

C. Children’s playground and activity areas

D. Outdoor recreation areas

E. Social areas

 

7. Remember key operations areas.

A. Housekeeping and Laundry

B. Physical Plant– electrical, mechanical, plumbing systems

C. Engineering and Maintenance

 

Non-guest related areas are often neglected. Yet, they and its workers are vital and valuable.

Use a variety of colors and/or graphics paint to accentuate areas that receive less attention.

It increases morale. It maintains a clean, pleasant work environment. It adds a spot of creativity.

 

Painting unfinished floors can benefit the facility’s operations areas in value-adding ways.

Painting the walls and floor accentuates the importance of the area, and persons that work there.

Painting these areas inspires anyone that works there, or passes through, to take care of the spaces, to keep them clean, and to maintain them. Even when the areas are in use 24/7.

 

Some deciding factors in every category:

 

  1. Urgency
  2. Necessity
  3. Relativity to business’s major market(s), focus and mission
  4. Owners’ and shareholders’ preferences and long-term goals
  5. Budget
  6. Availability – time lines
  7. Competition

 

No two hotel revival projects are the same. Not even when the properties are designed similarly, and owned by the same group.

 

Are you a hotel staff painter? Your involvement may vary. Depending on the area to be revived, your level of needed skills and abilities, and your time, may vary a lot.

Are you a project painter, employed by a commercial contractor? Your involvement is clear. You are put on the project because you can produce! Big time! And your skill sets, abilities and work personality fit that project.

 

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If a task is once begun, never leave it till it’s done. Be the labor great or small, do it well or not at all!

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.” Copyright 2015. Robert Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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