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Posts tagged ‘scheduling’

Painting It: Second Shift Tasks and Projects

Q. What tasks and projects fit well into late afternoon and night schedule?

1. Office areas, especially the painting of doors and molding.
2. Ceilings that are in high traffic areas during the day.
3. Touch-up painting and cleaning of restroom surfaces.
4. Vacant rooms – painting of entire room.

 

Q. How can tasks and projects that need full-light get done on a second shift schedule?

1. When available light is a question, use portable lighting that can be dimmed or filtered.
2. Create ceiling-to-floor partition, where excess lighting can be used.

 

Q. What tasks and projects should be done only during the day? On a First-shift basis?

1.  All interior/exterior surfaces can be painted, weather permitting and in low-traffic area.
Examples: Doors, moldings, ceilings, walls, floors, etc.
2. First shift can be a good time to perform spray painting tasks.
*  The ambient light will be at its highest.
*  When doing so, be aware of solvent odors, as both you and others may be exposed and become ill.

 

COMMON SENSE SECOND-SHIFT PAINTING TIPS

1. In any vacant or unoccupied area, use CAUTION TAPE for safety notification.
2. Always post WET PAINT signs outside of all interior work areas, even if area is vacant.
3. Tackle exterior projects which require temperature above 50 degrees Fahrenheit and full sun.
*  Do any exterior project which requires relatively low humidity.
*  Painting of any exterior surface must take into consideration the weather.
*  Paint products can be affected when not applied under the proper conditions.
*  Problems with drying time, paint sheen retention and proper adhesion can result.

 

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“Never tell yourself, ‘I have to do something.’ Tell yourself, ‘I get to do it!”

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Around Sharp Budget Cuts, Part 1

Sharp budget cuts mandate many changes in an organization – such as a hotel, hospital or university – that employs a full-time staff painter. They tend to include staff terminations in some departments – including engineering/facilities services/physical plant.

The loss of even one person, in an already manpower-strapped operation, can affect everyone there. Each person in a way unique to his or her job description, role as a member of the department team, and link as a member of the organizational team.

The work load increases, usually for everyone who still has a job.

Each person must continue to complete his or her own projects and work orders – in a timely, satisfactory manner. In addition, each has to assume some responsibility for the completion of tasks and work orders handled previously by the team member or members no longer there.

A painter, even a lead painter, may take on engineering/maintenance tech jobs and work orders.

Fill-in tasks, such as pest control spraying and mold/mildew remediation, may become regular parts of his or her routine job.

He or she may do basic guest room repairs and replacements. He or she may repair and replace air conditioner units, plumbing, lighting, tile and carpeting, roofing, WI-FI connections, and door key card systems.

The painter may help with mechanical and operating system repairs, and pool and spa repairs. He or she may be asked to handle exterior lighting and property security and safety system repairs. He or she may need to assist with groundskeeping and lawn maintenance.

 Any additional load leaves less time to get regular painting done.

How did you handle your engineering department’s last sharp budget cut? How many teammates, if any, did you lose? How many non-paint job responsibilities did you take on? For how long? How did it go?

Which, and how many, of your regular job tasks and projects got pushed on the back burners? How long ago was the last cutback? Do you continue to operate under capacity?

If so, how do you schedule in your regular projects and tasks? How do you make room for the added responsibilities? How do you ensure yourself the time and resources needed to do both jobs right?

Perhaps, one or more of the following related practices may help you be good-to-go.

 

1. Take your calendar – paper, online, app, etc. List your current paint shop-related projects and tasks.

 TIP: Take a little time with this. Make sure you get the main ones. Get down the other ones that you do take care of – and no one, including you, thinks much about.

 

2. With each project and task, determine where you’re really at.

ASK YOURSELF: What else needs to be done to complete it? Approximately, how much more time do you need to get each finished?

 

3. Prioritize each according to need. Set approximate time line and completion date.

 

4. On your calendar, slot out time needed each week – or every other week, at the latest – to work on each project.

TIP: You and your supervisor need to agree which ones must be completed as soon as possible. CAUTION: This can change at any time, and often. With little or no warning!

 

5. Allow yourself and your department a little flexibility.

 

6. Determine your regular paint shop tasks. The ones high on your job description and capability lists. Yes, those lists may vary a little or a lot.

 

7. Determine approximately how long you need, each week – or every other week, at the latest – to do each task.

 

8. Consider the best days of the week, and times, to work on each one.

Example: “Good-to-go: Wednesdays, 9-2, while most guests are visiting area theme parks; sightseeing; attending major sports event, conference, etc… and I can put other things on hold.”

 

9. Estimate how long you will need to do each.

 

10. Prioritize. Consult with your supervisor as needed.

 

11. Schedule onto your calendar – and all department calendars, too!

 

Sound like common-sense stuff, that every experienced painter will not need help with? Maybe.

When team size dwindles, available skill-sets and expertise can dwindle, too. So will available work time.

Confusion, stress and overload can set in suddenly. It can throw you off. Especially, if it hits you on an off day, at an off time.

“Nip it in the bud,” as character Barney Fife, “The Andy Griffith Show,” said repeatedly.

Get good-to-go. Block-in your painting and decorating related projects and tasks.

It is up to you to make certain that every paint-shop related project, task and work order is taken care of. That’s a given!

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Protect your own “staff painter” work day! Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob” blog.

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