Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Posts tagged ‘schools’

Painting and Decorating: Working with Interior Designers – Part I

Painters that work on higher-end commercial and/or residential projects will deal with interior designers. At one point or another.

 

The projects where you will find an interior designer are as vast as the clients that own the properties:

  • 4-5 star hotels/resorts, upscale malls, restaurants, theatres, performance centers, boutique shops;
  • hospital systems, assisted living facilities, rehabilitation centers;
  • schools, government complexes, corporate headquarters;
  • high rise buildings, luxury homes, private estates, condominium developments, etc.

 

BACKGROUND THE INTERIOR DESIGNER ON PROJECT MAY POSSESS

 

  1. BFA/Interior Design; professional member: American Society of Interior Designers (ASID).
  2. BA/Interior Design; professional member: ASID, IIDA and/or IDS.
  3. BA or BS/Architectural Design; professional member: American Institute of Architects (AIA).
  4. BA/Interior Design or Art; member: International Interior Designer Association (IIDA).
  5. BA or BS/Fine Art or Furnishings Design; member: Design Society of America (DSA) and/or International Furnishings and Design Association (AFDA); affiliate member: AIA, ASID, IIDA.

 

Today, interior designers need at least a BA or BFA and both professional and trade credentials. Some also hold an MA or MS in Business Management, even Business/Corporate Law.

 

OTHER IMPORTANT FACTS ABOUT THE INTERIOR DESIGNER

 

  1. Some interior designers are accredited by the Council for Interior Designers (CID).
  2. More millennial designers are opting for accreditation from the newer Interior Design Society.
  3. Most accredited interior designers are members of more than one professional association.
  4. Most are members of at least two trade organizations, also related educational foundations.
  5. Many play an active, affiliate role in their clients’ industries and trade associations.
  6. A growing number of them are affiliated with product-specific manufacturer associations.

 

Nearly all interior designers that work on high-end projects possess extensive experience working with painters and decorators. The designers hold themselves to very high standards. And, they expect the painters, with whom they deal, to do the same. One hundred, or close to, one hundred percent of the time.

 

A few months ago, a professional member of ASID e-mailed. She’d had to insist that the painter on a project be replaced.

 

WHY PAINTER ON INTERIOR DESIGNER PROJECT MAY NEED TO BE REPLACED

 

  1. Personality conflict
  2. Substandard craftsmanship
  3. Mismatched skills and abilities-to-project needs
  4. “Authority” issues
  5. Client/customer conflict
  6. Time, budget and manpower limits
  7. Honesty and security issues
  8. Other reasons – eg. work environment

 

HOW A PAINTER CAN SECURE POSITION ON INTERIOR DESIGNER PROJECT

 

  1. Be yourself. Be honest. Be sincere. Be professional.
  2. Respect the interior designer’s role.

 

That said, also…

 

  1. Treat the designer with respect.
  2. When he or she is speaking to you, please listen. Try to tune out all distractions.
  3. Acknowledge what the designer is telling you – verbally, and with appropriate gestures.
  4. Answer his or her questions, when they are asked – and briefly as possible.
  5. Offer your view, when appropriate.
  6. Ask for his or her opinion, advice or input, as appropriate.
  7. Accept the interior designer’s input with grace.
  8. Hold back from pushing your knowledge or opinion upon the designer.
  9. Hang loose. Be flexile wherever and whenever you can.
  10. Show him or her that you recognize the problems that the project presents. Examples: Client, spatial, budget, deadlines, products/materials, deliveries, schedule.

 

The dynamics between the painter and the interior designer are unique, and curious. They tend to be challenging, and changeable. Two top benefits for each: a first-rate referral and trusted friend.

 

As an award-winning interior and furniture designer once told a group of students at Harrington Institute of Interior Design,

 

“One of your greatest collaborators on any project will be the painter and decorator. The person who executes the very foundations of your design: color, pattern, and texture.”

 

See blog: “Painting and Decorating: Working with Interior Designers – Part II”

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

Getting Unemployed Properties “Back to Work” – Part 2

Recently, I heard of a group of five entrepreneurs that save smaller properties, like the three men did in the Midwest. (See “Getting Unemployed Properties, Part 1.)

 

This group purchases abandoned smaller schools, rehabilitation facilities, hotels, and churches. Then, they remodel and retrofit each property to fill a specific voice in its respective community. “Usually, within a 25-mile radius.”

 

A few examples:

 

  1. One-story elementary school, north central Florida, converted into a residential facility for moderately-to-severely handicapped teens and adults.

 

  1. One-story private elementary school, in northwest Florida, turned into a non-denominational assisted living facility for low-income persons.

 

  1. Two-story hotel, in southeast Georgia, transformed into low-income rental “villas.”

 

  1. 100-room hotel, in north central Florida, retrofitted as an assisted living facility, complete with ADA-compliant pool and spa.

 

  1. One-story high school, turned into short-term rehabilitation center and permanent ALF for handicapped military veterans.

 

  1. Small church and adjoining education building, remodeled as a year-round community center.

 

Within the last five years, the group has purchased, then helped “revitalize and recycle” over 15 properties. Two persons in the group are brothers.

 

One is a cardiovascular physician and surgeon, that co-finances the group’s “property rescue projects.” The other brother is a journey-level painter, that specializes in remodeling, renovating, and retrofitting what he calls “people-public properties.”

 

The painter in the group e-mailed me about his role in getting some of these properties “back to work.”

 

“Usually, I work as both the foreman and line painter on a crew of five commercial painters. My project work can be divided into eight phases.

 

  1. Surface/area assessment – conditions and needs.
  2. Product and color estimating, selecting and ordering.
  3. Tool and equipment selecting, purchasing or renting, and keeping track of.
  4. Work area set-ups and scheduling.
  5. Painter assignments and outfitting.
  6. Painting with the rest of the crew.
  7. Troubleshooting and punch lists.
  8. Cooperating with inspectors and sign-off people.

 

“My work is time sensitive… labor and ability intensive. We rely a lot on each other. Across trade lines…. A big, learning experience for me. On every project…”

 

“The painters’ job on these projects is not to restore the surfaces to their pristine, original condition. It’s not to deal with style-conscious interior designers. And, forget trying to please the owners and investors 100 percent. (This group doesn’t expect that.) We don’t have any of them on these projects.

 

“We’re all here with the same dream: To get the property back to good use. No egos here.”

 

He closed with this motivating message…

 

“Practically anyone can do this. Pull together a few friends and relatives. Pool your brains, money and abilities. Save one building. Help some decent people in your own community.”

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

“Charity begins where we’re working. Where we’re standing.” rdh

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved

Tag Cloud