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Posts tagged ‘staff’

Painter’s View: How to find something to like about every teammate, and project

Ground rule: Expect, demand and require nothing more from someone else than you would ask of yourself.

 

 

TEAMMATES

 

1. Put yourself in his or her shoes. What do you know the person values highly about himself or herself?

 

2. What does he or she know more about that you need to learn? Example: how to use Windows 10.

 

3. When your back needs to be covered in a specific way, who would know what to do? Example: Yesterday, you needed to leave work early because of a family emergency. Maintenance tech Joe finished repainting the guest room walls, then cleaned up the area and tools.

 

4. When double trouble hits the department on an already busy day, w ho tends to lend a hand in a hurry, though he or she is busy, too? Example: A main water pipe bursts. HVAC pro Rick drops everything to help take care of the problem.

 

5.Those passes in the corridor, on a sidewalk, or in the front offices are for a purpose. Take a minute. What resource can you tap from that person? Example: Kyle orders supplies form Lowes. He may know the current price of drywall sheets.

 

6. Discover what part of his or her job is liked the most. Then ask why.

 

7. What else is he or she very good at, that has nothing to do with the job description? Example: Front desk clerk Mario plans fundraising dinners for his 850 member church. Could he help out when the hotel’s event planner is swamped?

 

8. Who comes to work excited, and knows he or she is making even a little difference in the world?

 

9. Who makes mistakes freely and fearlessly, and does not apologize for them, but concentrates on getting things done anyway?

 

10. What is one of his or her favorite off-the-job interests? Do you enjoy the same thing? Or, are you at least curious about it?

 

 

PROJECT

 

1. What new product will you get to use? What special skill will you be applying that you’ve always wanted to use on the property? Example: To save money, your engineer and you will patch, then recoat the roofs, using a newer system you’ve wanted to learn.

 

2. What high-traffic area needs complete resurfacing pronto? And your bosses are counting on you to handle it right. Example: Suddenly, the paint starts to chip and curl off of the pool area’s gazebo floor. The hotel’s at full occupancy. Put your concrete coating experience to the test. Get that guest amenity up and running with minimal down time.

 

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Sometimes to see a change for the better, you have to take things

into your own hands.   Clint Eastwood

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Thank you, teammates of the world, that do your jobs right, and cover each other’s backs.

 

And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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How Teamwork Cut a Hotel’s Expenses by over $120,000

The hotel management explained, versus announced, to all staff the “need” to cut expenses “across the board,” as much as $120,000.

 

To kick off the effort, all managers – salaried staff – volunteered to take a 10 percent reduction in salary. “To start.” In addition, they agreed to pay 50 to 100 percent of certain expenses “out-of-pocket,” and non-reimbursable later by the hotel business.

 

Examples: Vehicle gas for local driving, association membership dues, event registrations and meals, and business entertainment.

 

They opted to fly 100 percent coach seats for all hotel-related business travel. Also, they gave up their vacation and bonus packages for one full year.

 

Then, the entire staff got accountable, and very creative.

 

1. Each department set a goal to reduce its budget by $10,000.

 

2. Management and all department directors and supervisors agreed, committed to, and announced: “No staff member would be let go.”

 

3. Then, the staff members in each department voted themselves pay cuts: 50 cents an hour for part-time employees; $1.00 an hour for full-time. Like the management they gave up their vacation pay for one full year. (A big sacrifice for employees with families.)

 

4. Each staff member assumed responsibility for reducing his or her supplies budget by at least 10 percent. The supplies had to relate specifically to his or her job description. Also, management’s productivity expectations for staff members was set in proportion to the reduction in supplies and materials available for them to do their work.

 

Examples: Painter. The “paint shop” expense reduction goal: 25 percent.

A. Less expensive paint would be ordered and used for low traffic and less visible areas.

B. Used rags still in good condition would be soaked, laundered and reused.

C. Worn, essential brushes would be replaced with mid-brand products – eg. Linzer, Branford, Arro Worthy, Merrit, Bestt Liebco, Proform. Worn, rarely used brushes would be replaced on an as needed basis during the tight budget year.

       Note: Read “Paint with Budget Cuts: Your Paint Shop Brushes,” posted March 07, 2015.

 

Examples: Maintenance techs. Maintenance shop” expense reduction goal: 15 percent.

A. All recyclable parts, from no-longer usable air conditioners, would be removed, cleaned, catalogued, and stored for making future repairs.

B. Parts, which were tarnished or mildly corroded, were cleaned instead of replaced.

C. Some parts were painted and reused, until replacement parts could be budgeted.

 

5. Each department group launched a “team support” program.

A. Whenever possible, team members shared rides to and from work.

B. Staff that were parents, especially of younger children, created a plan to save each other babysitter and transportation costs.

 

6. A related “Share My Ride” program was implemented interdepartmentally.

Example: Keisha, a housekeeping supervisor, picked up and dropped off PBX operator Elsa at her apartment complex’s front entrance, on days that both worked the same shift.

 

7. Departments shared supplies, tools and equipment whenever and wherever possible. This practice reduced overall purchasing expenses by 15 to over 20 percent with some essential items.

 

8. Monthly, each department hosted its own “carry-in” lunch. During every shift.

 

9. The hotel kitchen sent no good food to the dumpster. Especially leftovers or over-cooking from guest/conference banquets, dinners, buffets, etc.

A. The leftover food was made available to all staff members at meal and break times.

B. Depending on the quantity of leftover food, staff could pack “doggie boxes” to take home at the end of their shift.

 

The hotel management incurred no major problem – and no resistance – from any department or any staff member in meeting the budget cut needs.

 

Everyone pulled together to make it all happen. They protected their own jobs and livelihoods by helping to protect each other’s jobs.

 

They focused on need. They prioritized. They got very creative.

 

Two Engineering Department examples:

 

  1. A maintenance tech attended a technical college two evenings a week. To catch his connecting bus, he had to clock out one hour earlier those afternoons. A coworker passed the college on his way home each day. So, he offered the tech a ride to the college’s front entrance. The tech was able to work his full eight-hour shift, and could afford to pay a few dollars to the coworker for the rides each week.

 

  1. The painter generated free supplies from construction supply and paint stores where he did business. Also, he tapped the superintendents of several large commercial contractors that he knew. In kind, he arranged for the store managers to be able to (1) test out a few new product and equipment lines at the hotel and (2) videotape the new products being used. The construction superintendents received comp stays for their families at the hotel.

 

Hotel budget cuts provide a great opportunity for teamwork in action. At its best! And, at every level: organizationally, interdepartmentally, departmentally.

 

It invites tremendous creativity, collaboration and cooperation on a small-to-large scale. Most important, at a particularly stressful time, team-driven hotel budget cuts bring people together.

 

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An early “HAPPY ST. PATRICK’S DAY” to all ye Irish lads and lassies.

A special “Hello” to everyone in the Chicago area.

 

Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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