Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Posts tagged ‘Supervisors’

Painter’s View: How to find something to like about every boss or employer

Ground rule: Expect, demand and require nothing more from someone else than you would ask of yourself.

 

 

EMPLOYER

 

1. What matters the most to him or her here?

2. What three things does he or she do very well?

3. What one thing do you envy about him or her?

4. In a room of 100 bosses, what would make your boss stand out?

5. Name two ways that your boss walks the talk.

6. Name two things he or she does to cover the backs of every person under his charge.

7. Is your boss a good everyday leader?

8. Does your boss help each worker to understand that he or she has something special to contribute here?

9. Does your boss trust and delegate as a habit?

10. Does your boss know when to listen, learn, lead, or follow? And, do it?

11. Does your boss value the wisdom of his or her workers?

12. Does your boss recognize that his workers know what’s what?

13. Does your boss teach and show others how to make smart decisions and take decisive action?

14. Does your boss value his or her entire team?

15. Does your boss invite or encourage every worker to bring solutions for problems?

16. What part of his or her attitude, behavior, and approach moves you to emulate?

17. How does your boss remove obstacles that may prevent his or her workers from doing their jobs?

18. Does your boss work together with his or her people?

19. Does your boss really care about each of his or her workers?

20. Does your boss empower his or her workers to do what is right?

21. How does your boss wow every worker?

22. Instead of ordering his or her people to do things, does your boss grab an oar and row with them?

23. Does your boss know when to lead, when to follow, and when to get out of the way? And, does he or she do it?

 

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It takes each of us to make a difference for all of us!

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Thank you to all bosses that hang in there, do their jobs, and treat their people like they matter.

 

And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Painting In: Company Policy, Common Sense, and Common Courtesy: Part 2

Scenario No. 1: A regular hotel guest reports that the paint color used to touch up in his room does not match the rest of the wall. He wants the entire wall repainted immediately. It’s after 3 pm on Day 4 of a 7-night stay. He declines management’s offer to move him to a different room, and “comp” him for one night’s stay.

 

Company Policy: Have the painter inspect the area, and repaint the wall when the guest will be gone for the day.

 

Common Sense: Painter tries to arrange to repaint the wall, when the guest will be out of the room for at least four (4) hours, to allow the fresh paint fumes to dissipate.

 

Common Courtesy: Painter talks, one-on-one, with the guest and explains that the hotel values his patronage. The painter emphasizes the importance of repainting the wall, when it’s safest for the guest.

 

 

 

Scenario No. 2: A guest calls the front desk, and reports multiple large black mold buildups in the bathroom. Rooms Manager offers to move the guest to another room. The guest declines.

 

Company Policy: A housekeeping supervisor assesses the extent of major black mold buildup. She calls the painter to clean up/remove the mold.

 

Common Sense: Painter uses mild soap and warm water mixture to reduce the level of buildup, and the guest’s exposure to mold spores. The standard chemical bleach solution is not used, to prevent the guest from suffering an adverse reaction to dangerous bleach fumes.

 

Common Courtesy: Inform the guest that the mild soap/warm water mixture is a temporary, partial solution. Explain that treatment with the more effective bleach solution requires that the room remain unoccupied for at three (3) hours. HEALTH TIP: Place a fan in the room to increase ventilation, and air flow.

 

 

Scenario No. 3: The painter finds a guest crying, because she has been locked out of her room. He hears young children crying inside. He tries the key card; it does not work. He learns that the guest owes back rent for the room.

 

Company Policy: The guest/mother must go to the front office and make payment arrangements. Then the guest will be allowed access into the room.

 

Common Sense: Painter calls the head of security, to get help for the children a.s.a.p. Painter uses master key card to open the room door. He lets the mother stand in the doorway, and check that her children are safe. Then, he has the guest/mother step back outside. He re-closes and relocks the door.

 

Common Courtesy: Painter gets permission and assists the guest/mother in getting promptly to the front office, to make payment arrangements. A security officer stands guard outside the guest’s room, to ensure the safety of the children inside.

 

 

Scenario No. 4: A customer changes his mind about the paint colors, just applied inside his new martial arts studio. He tries to reject the job, and refuses to pay. He insists that the painters redo the entire job (over 1800 square feet), in time for his grand opening four days away.

 

Company Policy: (1) Payment in full is due when the paint job is completed, per the terms of the contract. (2) The customer rejected paint job because he changed his mind, not because of any problem with the products and/or workmanship. (3) The “redo” is considered a new paint job. It must be contracted separately, and scheduled at the convenience of both the contractor and customer.

 

Common Sense: Talk one-on-one with the customer. Find out what’s really bothering him. Does he have the money to pay for the job completed? Did he, or someone else, select the original color scheme? Regardless: Require payment in full of customer’s bill.

 

Common Courtesy: (1) Offer customer a small cost break for paint job no. 1, if payment in full received within twenty-four hours. (2) If possible, offer to redo the front part of studio in time for the grand opening, using the new colors. Terms: Signed contract for the new paint job, at least one-half prepayment for labor, purchase and delivery, in 24-hours, of all products and materials responsibility of customer.

 

Scenario No. 5: Exterior paint, applied one week ago, peels off the surface in rain. Commercial customer is upset. (The painters: “Us, too!”)

 

Company Policy: Call in paint manufacturer’s rep to inspect, and analyze. Nothing wrong found with the paint. Nothing wrong found with the substrate, surface’s preparation, or paint application by the painters. Strike agreement with paint manufacturer: They pay for new prep and finish products, also re-rental of required equipment – eg. hydraulics.

 

Common Sense: Report to paint manufacturer’s rep all concerns about product (s), and use.

TIP: Check all products, materials, tools, and equipment used for cleaning, removing, prepping.

 

Common Courtesy: Put customer’s final payment on hold till the job is redone. If possible, offer customer a nominal cost break on the whole job. TIP: Do not take the bulk of cost cut out of labor part.

 

Painting In, through, with, or in spite of company policy, common sense, and/or common courtesy challenges is part of the job. And, more often than not, it must be played by ear. Each time around.

 

With experience comes greater perceptivity, clearer understanding, more creativity, and deeper wisdom.

 

By the way, it might well be that youthe painter – are the more perceptive, understanding, creative, and wiser one when it comes to doing your painting job right!

 

 

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Follow through! Stay true to your own high standards and work ethic!

Thank  you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

 

 

Training Engineering/Maintenance Techs Basic Commercial Painting Skills and Methods

Introduction:

Mechanical repairs for a Maintenance Tech are no less important than the appearance of the room or space that you seek to improve. Surface repairs and painting can be learned to a point where you are as confident in doing it, as you are in performing your normal duties.

Building skills as a painter/tech requires the ability to respond to a wide variety of conditions. You want to be ready to use appropriate methods of painting to improve the appearance of a commercial business. You want everyone to be satisfied with the work: guests, visitors, customers, supervisors, management, and yourself.

 

1. What every tech needs to know about the painting trade.

 

A. Standard methods and techniques continue to work, when they match the criteria for which they were developed: surface/substrate, product/material, tools, equipment, environment.

B. Paint store managers, manufacturer’s reps, and interior designers tend to be excellent resources.

C. Many standard methods and techniques can be adapted – when used skillfully and carefully.

D. Surfaces should be touched-up, when you know the exact paint used before – or you are very skilled at mixing, matching and blending products, colors and textures.

E. For best results, the existing area should be blended with the touch-up or newly painted area.F. Before painting, the area should be prepared, so the new application matches the surface.

F. To preserve brushes, roller covers, work container, etc., clean them at the end of each day.

G. When finished, the work areas must be kept tidy and clean – guest room, walkway, paint shop

2. What every tech needs to know about painting and finishing products, in general.

 

A. Three main categories of products include waterborne (water-based), solvent borne(oil/petroleum-based), and catalyst  activated (eg. epoxy, urethane).

B. Generally, these products are composed of latexes, oils, urethanes, epoxies, and polyurethanes.

C. Many more types of products are available.

D. Products are designed for interior, exterior, and both interior/exterior applications.

 

3. What every tech needs to know about hotel/facility painting.

 

A. Touch-up paint color/tint that you use must match the paint on adjacent surfaces.

B. Some work orders can’t wait until you complete your current project or task.

C. Your chief engineer is your supervisor – not any other department manager.

D. When you stand in for the painter, both he and your supervisor are counting on you to do a good job – and to follow the rules and procedures.

E. Advance notice of the designated work areas, and “WET PAINT” use must be given to others.

F. Making note if more paint, supplies, etc. are needed helps you get job done on schedule.

 

4. What every tech needs to know to handle priority painting work orders.

 

A. Clearly understand what’s needed, also any limits – eg. time, budget, non-budgeted needs.

B. Select products/materials, tools, etc. based on need, inventory, budget/cost, time, traffic, etc.

C. Select method or technique based on surface/substrate and condition, location, time limit, etc.

D. Always give notice of painting to supervisor and/or other department managers (housekeeping, front desk) that room is to be put “OUT OF ORDER.”

E. Any work area – guest room, public restroom, restaurant, pool area, etc. – must be unoccupied, or “OUT OF ORDER” to complete the work safely and satisfactorily.

 5. TIPS: Training techs to perform basic painting tasks professionally.

 

A. Respect each tech’s unique set of skills and abilities, and known limitations.

B. Ask where, when and how they got painting their experience. (Basic information)

C. Find out the type(s) of painting projects they have worked on. What did they do? How often? For how long? Which were under no…little …a lot of supervision?

D. Assume they know the basic brush and roller techniques for materials to be used.

E. SHOW THEM the proper paints for specific areas.

F. Ensure that all techs, who will do paint-shop work, can repair areas that need to be painted.

 

6. TIPS: Training techs basic painting – the journey-apprentice way.

 

A. Work side-by-side with each trainee to ensure continuity in his or her workmanship.

B. Help each tech to find his or her comfort level using required methods, products, tools, etc.

C. Provide techs with tools of quality equal to those used by a journey instructor, or painter.

D. SHOW techs the basic methods of repairing wall damages on different surfaces and areas.

E. SHOW techs the proper way to spray paint a large surface. Include safety requirements.

 

Closing Comments:

An engineering/maintenance tech’s painting savvy will be only as sharp as the quality of his or her training; access to needed products, materials, supplies, and tools; and on-going support (departmentally and interdepartmentally).

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

RE: Endorsing “Painting” Skills. A Painter’s Survey

Painting and decorating, in combination, has been respected as a trade or profession in construction for over forty years. Painting, its predecessor and around for centuries, not as much.

For many years, in many socio-economic-political circles, painting was looked upon as a lower-skilled, lower-level job. Supposedly, anyone able to hold a paint brush could do it to earn some money. Example: College students that needed to pay for their education.

Men that worked as painters were the subject of crude jokes, raw cartoons, class-conscious ridicule, and business-employment de-classing. Many were labeled or type cast, even within their own trade. They were regarded as non-professional, unlicensed, uncertified, and uneducated.

In the construction industry, painters had to work much harder than other tradespersons to prove their worth, and to earn a decent wage. Regardless of the high level of professionalism that a growing number of painters were bringing to their jobs. The skill and workmanship they demonstrated. The fine craftsmanship with which they completed every project.

Too often, this tends to be true today. Recognition of painters for their expertise can be slow in coming. Even with the unlimited speed of and access to outstanding electronic media.

To test this point, I surveyed thirty-one journey-level painters with profiles posted on a professional/career website. All listed “Painting” as one of their top “skills” in the ‘Skills and Endorsements” section.

Six questions were asked. Below are the questions – and corresponding numerical responses.

1. How many months after posting “Painting” as a skill did you receive an endorsement of it?

A. 1-3 months            3  B. 4-6 months         C. 7-9 months         D. 10-12 months

E. After 12 months    F. No response

2. Who endorsed your “Painting” skill within the first twelve months? Check all that apply.

4  A. Co-worker          B. Supervisor/Manager       C. Customer/Client

5  D. Paint supplier/Manufacturer’s rep                      3  E. Painter/non-coworker

4  F. Former co-worker/Manager                               G. Property owner

H. Friend/Relative                                                   1  I. No response

3. How many persons endorsed your “Painting” skill without being asked?

A. 1-3          B. 4-6          C. 7-9          D. 10-12      E. 13-15

F. 16 or more                    G. No response

4. Who asked the person to endorse your “Painting” skill? Check all that apply.

A. You        B. Supervisor/Manager       C. Co-worker          D. Customer/Client

E. Paint supplier/Manufacturer’s rep          F. Former co-worker/Manager

G. Painter/non-coworker                           H. No response

5. Who did you anticipate would endorse your “Painting” skill, that did not? Check all that apply.

A. Supervisor/Manager                   B. Co-worker                     C. Customer/Client

D. Former co-worker/Manager       E. Paint supplier/Manufacturer’s rep

F. Another tradesperson                G. Relative/Friend              H. No response

6. How many persons that endorsed your “Painting” skill endorsed additional painting trade skills?

A. 1-3          B. 4-6          C. 7-9          D. 10-12      E. 13-15

1  F. 16 or more                     G. No response

More than two-thirds of the painters that responded – even with a “No response” – added a comment.  The following one got right to the point.

From Steve, Chicago area:

“Why are co-workers, supervisors and managers slow and reluctant to praise their painters publicly? Example: Endorsing, Liking, or recommending their painting and decorating skills on electronic career and social networks. I’ve been lead painter for a 1100+ room hotel and convention center for over twelve years. The two engineering techs that handle basic re-paints and minor touch-ups, and help with big projects, have each been there over six years. We know that everyone there, including management, considers us professionals at our jobs, and appreciates our abilities. What gives?”

My response:

“Often, supervisors and co-workers are wrapped up in their own agendas. They may be great at promoting themselves, close colleagues and friends. They may forget or overlook opportunities to publicly support and promote co-workers and staff members. They may not want to ‘go public’ with their praise. Or, they may not want to go on record with YOU about their position regarding your skills and contributions…”

Bottom line: If it’s important to you, ask someone that should know, or will find out.

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Which one of your skills deserve more endorsements that it has received?

What skills-endorsing strategy works best for you?

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