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Changes and Advancements in Hotel/Facility Painting, Part 3: Supplies, Tools and Equipment

Introduction

 
The standard types of painting tools and equipment will always be in use, as long as the paint products go unchanged in how they are applied. Paint spray equipment applications are not to be replaced. They are only approved upon by making subtle changes to spray guns and paint pumping systems.

When it relates to the roller cover, its design is continually being re-examined for ways to improve its performance, primarily with new materials. Widely used tools and equipment are difficult to replace. Changes in supplies mean costly changes to a system which is already operating efficiently.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Supplies:

A. Abrasives, caulking, patching compounds, masking materials, and other items. Changes: meet the demands of structural components and newer surfaces, also environmental changes.

B. Sanding products produced for wet or dry use. Option: Abrasives affixed to a sponge type substrate, allowing greater flexibility.

C. Caulking produced as waterborne and siliconized. Advantages: Resist cracking, and provide waterproofing, while allowing the surface to be painted.

D. Patching compounds that dry faster and harder. Advantages: sand easier, allow painting sooner.

E. Masking tapes designed to be left on the surface longer. Advantages: Do not pull the surface loose, and make re-taping unnecessary.

 

Comments about Supplies:

Commonly used supplies have advanced little. They tend to fulfill the need, in an efficient manner, for which they have been designed.

The quality of supplies must not be overlooked. They are your aid in producing a quality painting or finishing job. They sure can make it easier. By the way, a poorly adhering masking tape is not going to do you any favors.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Tools:

A. More paint brushes designed for applying multiple types of coating. Brush hairs are a composite of nylon, polyester, olefin, and other synthetic fibers.

B. Roller frames designed to reduce the friction of the roller covers. Added feature: control the covers from slipping off of the roller frames.

C. Roller covers, with new developments in nap composition. Advantages: Optimal nap composition which lasts longer, and is durable with various coatings.

D. Advancements that consider the ergonomics of a tool’s use. Example: Joint knife, which must be very strong and flexible. It must provide an excellent grip and balance for effective use.

 

Comments about Tools:

Advancements in tools are needed, especially when a product or material has no way of being applied. A tool must be designed, tested, fabricated, and marketed to industry, business and public consumers.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Equipment:

 A. Fine finishing, hand-held and airless portable spray system. Designed for ease of use by the professional painter and finisher. Homeowner/general consumer models: easier to operate, clean, and maintain.

B. Masking machines that are easy to manipulate in taping procedures. Normally for commercial, residential and automotive painting.

C. Spray pumps designed for easier use by the homeowner/general consumer market. Features: lighter weight, easy to set up, simple to clean up. Pressure fluid: maintained electronically.

 

Comments about Equipment:

Changes in equipment occur when use and testing point to an area of design which can be improved. I consider advancements, something which really alters the marketing of a piece of equipment.
What marks a more advanced piece of equipment? Some key features: greater performance, more energy efficient, more ergonomics, and increased durability.

 

Closing Comments about Painting Supplies, Tools and Equipment:

A successful painting project requires that all intended and needed supplies, tools and equipment are available, reliable and qualitative. Consistently, they must help the painter to (1) produce above-standard workmanship, (2) achieve satisfactory-plus results, and (3) ensure cost-effective durability.

 

PAINTER’S TIPS: Wisely choose each supply, tool and piece of equipment. Then, care and maintain each one properly. Maximize its potential usefulness and effectiveness on future projects, work orders and tasks. You’ll be glad that you did.

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Even the most advanced supply, tool, or piece of equipment is only as effective as the painter using it.

Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2014, 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paintshop: What is the Best Paint?

Paints and coatings are similar. What separates them from each other is their ability to retain color and their durability of sheen.

 

The typical factors, which can affect this, are (1) surface exposure to the sun, (2) cleanliness, and (3) humidity.

 

First of all, to find the “best possible paint” for your application, consult paint store and manufacturer recommendations.

 

As a rule, you get what you pay for. Normally, the best quality paint will have the highest price. With the modern development in coatings research, the quality of paint is at its highest level. Now, there are paints which combine primer as part of their formulation.

 

Usually, I prefer to use a suitable primer, then let it dry. And I apply a top coat, especially designed for that surface and that primer-top coat combination. To each his own, however.

 

Each surface requires a paint that is specific to its requirements. You wouldn’t put latex paint on bare steel. And, you wouldn’t prime the steel with the recommended primer and then apply a latex finish paint. If you don’t know the difference, you might.

 

There are “best paints” for every class of surfaces. Here are a few of them.

 

  1. Exterior masonry. Use an elastomeric coating. It’s a high-build, water-proofing material.
  2. Steel. Use epoxy primer and finish. They provide an extremely durable, chemical resistant finish.
  3. Interior drywall. Use acrylic latex. It leaves a highly washable, color retentive finish.
  4. Non ferrous metal. Use oil galvanizing primer. It has excellent adhesive properties.
  5. Automotive. Use urethane. It has ultimate durability, high color retention, resist abrasions.
  6. All surfaces. Use oil-based paint. It provides excellent durability, color retention, resist stains.

 

Then, there are my “best brand paint picks.” Opinions may vary. Yet, there are standards of quality, cost and reputation for each manufacturer.

 

  1. Interior/Exterior house paints: #1 Glidden; #2 Sherwin Williams; #3 Behr.
  2. Wood finishes: #1 Minwax; #2 Olympia.
  3. Masonry: #1 Glidden; #2 Sherwin Williams.
  4. Fine finish metals: #1 DuPont, #2 Sherwin Williams.
  5. Industrial coatings: #1 Sherwin Williams.

 

There are many paint and coatings’ manufacturers out there. Do your research, especially when you are questioning a surface’s compatibility with a particular paint type. Paint failures or a reduced life of the sheen can occur if the wrong selection is made.

 

 

A STORY OF EXTREMES

 

As a commercial painter, I was once assigned a job to decorate the front offices and lobby of an automotive body shop. My job was to paint all of the drywall ceilings, with a flat white latex, and to apply vinyl wall coverings to all of the walls and the electrical cover plates. It sounded simple enough.

 

But as I got started, I saw several of the body shop workers carrying stack s of wood moulding into their service area. And when the doors arrived – about 12 of them, they were taken to that area as well.

 

I was busy doing my own work. Until one day, I went back and discovered a couple of body shop employees working on the doors and woodwork. They were painting them.

 

I thought:  Well, that’s just fine. Then, I realized that the paint they were using was not the run of the mill latex or oil I would have used. I was shocked, yet totally amazed at what they were doing.

 

The owner had chosen to finish his woodwork with automotive paint. I never heard of such a thing. On his own, the owner decided to experiment.

 

The product he chose to use was a two-part urethane with a clear coat final finish.  The finish was known for its unsurpassed durability and extremely high gloss.

 

Okay! I waited and continued with my duties. In the last days of my work, I got to see the carpenters putting everything up. Room by room, they installed the doors and the trim. Then the body shop guys sprayed the last coat of clear coat.

 

We had a party upon completion of the project. And we got to witness the end result. It was beyond words.

 

THE DOORS! I’m not kidding. You could see yourself. When you walked along the casing or baseboard, you could see your reflection as you walked by. Not only that: This interior finishing had the most durable finish I had ever seen.

 

When I talked to the owner, he said: “I want my shop to be the only one of its kind. I want it to be perfect. I don’t care how long it takes. And money is no object.”

 

By the way, he invited shop owners from all over the area to the party. So they could admire the work done on his body shop. And, I even got to take a bow.

 

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Creative results are often the harmonious blend of the norm with the impossible.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

PAINTING IT: DOOR PROJECTS

Have you ever seen that “vacation” commercial, that featured 6 to 8 identical, and individual, wood ocean bathhouses? Each door was painted a high-gloss, super-bright color? That scene captivated me. (Forget the ocean backdrop.)

 

Doors are fun to paint or refinish. They can be a challenge to “get right.”

 

Here are some door projects on which I’ve worked. Each of them very unique. And very pleasing to the eyes!

 

PROJECT: Spray painted 550 new, and roller re-painted 210 existing, wood guest room doors. Property: 800-room resort hotel. Location: Central Florida. Crew: 2( self, apprentice).

Set-up: Hotel management “blocked out” row/section of rooms according to painter’s schedule.

Challenge: The surface and wood construction integrity of most of the used doors had been compromised. They had many cracks, splinters, gouges, nicks, warping, water damage, and termite damage.

 

PROJECT: Color-code painted 610 interior and exterior doors, wood and metal; plus archways.

Property: Orphanage and school. Location: Chicago area. Crew: 3 (including self).

Set-up: Administrators “moved” classes and activities to other rooms and areas in school building. Staff “doubled up” sleeping spaces in dorm bedrooms, to vacate half a floor at a time.

Creative Challenge: Starting with base/paint color: White semi-gloss enamel. Tinting over 30 closely-graduated color-palette hues in sky blue, bright green, sun yellow, and peach families.

People Fun Challenge: Children wanted to be a part of the action. Barricading off work areas motivated some children – and adults – to find very creative ways to watch. A few tried to “help” the painter.

 

PROJECT: Re-painted 360 interior doors, each in slightly different color palette tint or shade. Property: Girls home and school. Location: Northwest Indiana. Crew: 2 (self, apprentice).

NOTE: Area business owner donated all products, materials, supplies, and equipment rentals.

Creative Challenges:

  1. Selecting 360 different tints and shades from Sherwin-Williams commercial color chip book.
  2. Custom tinted base paint white semi-gloss enamel for each door. To do: Poured white base paint into 362 glass, quart-sized Mason canning jars. Formulated each tint using paint dye kit, and S-W’s tinting guide.

Supplies Challenge: Locating 360+ glass jars, and screw lids with seals.

 

PROJECT: Restoration of 75+ carved, antique wood doors.

Property: Mid-1890s house, cottage. Location: S. Florida. Crew: 2 (self, F-T; apprentice, P-T).

Procedural Challenges:

  1. Required extensive and careful repairing, filling, repairing of carved areas on all doors.
  2. Required special products, then custom mixing and blending for EACH door.
  3. Required ample “wait times” for settling, gelling, drying, melding, and related processes.

Client Challenge: Property owner/family matriarch insisted on residing in main house, while it was being worked on. Frequently, she suffered serious reactions to chemicals in special products needed for restoration work.

 

PROJECT: Restoration of over 105 paneled and carved wood doors, with inlays.

Property: Small 120-year old church, monastery. Location: Indiana. Crew: 2 (self, apprentice).

Note: Anonymous donor covered costs. For years, monks had struggled to maintain buildings.

Creative Challenge: Custom mixing prep and finish products; testing on each door before using.

Surface Challenge: Most doors had numerous cracks, gouges, pieces of carved strips missing.

 
PROJECT: Refinished 60+ very old wood doors, poor condition.

Property: Nursing home, built 1930s. Location: Florida. Crew: 2 (Apprentice, self).

Compliance Challenge: A code compliance project, per order of Florida Department of Health.

Budget Challenge: Very limited budget. Home located: low income, underserved neighborhood.

 

PROJECT: Repainted all doors, children’s wing, including “burn ward” and trauma center.

Property: Non-profit hospital, religious group-owned. Location: S. Florida. Crew: 2.

Management’s objective: Part of effort to “spruce up” wing, and attract more capital support.

Logistics Challenge: No part of wing could be closed down during project. All procedures, tasks, uses of products, tools and equipment had to adhere to facility policies, government regulations.

Product Challenge: All products, materials and supplies had to meet stringent health, safety, environmental, and other requirements, standards and codes.

 

PROJECT: Installation of red flock wallpaper and wood railing and trim onto doors.

Property: Private residence, circa 1920s. Location: Southeast Florida. Crew: 1 (self).

Creative Challenges:

  1. Applied wallpaper, trim, to doors of living, dining, reading rooms with walls covered in same paper.
  2. Desired effect: Closed, the doors, and their trims, baseboards blended right in with the walls.
  3. Required: Cutting, staining, finishing, and installing of horizontal wood strips of railing, and hand-crafted wood baseboard, on doors. Trims had to align with adjacent railings, baseboards.

 

PROJECT: Painted doors and wood cabinetry in 17 bed and bath suites.

Property: Small inn. Location: Indiana. Crew: 1 (self).

Owner specifications: Paint each set of doors in slightly different tint of hunter green – Gliddens.

Supplies Challenge: Finding 17 empty and immaculate metal 1-gallon paint cans, with tight lids.

Logistics Challenge: Dividing project into phases, that matched phase schedule for each suite.

Procedural Challenge:

  1. Tinting of each gallon of paint in closely-graduated hue, to match respective color chip.
  2. Testing out each tint on most visible surface of suite, in which it would be applied.
  3. Making certain everyone followed 24-hour “wait and see” to check color, coverage, viscosity.
  4. Following alternating schedule to allow for ample prepping and primer drying.

Example: Starting with suite 1, kept work on each suite “evolving” into next phase.

 

Like I said, painting or finishing a door can be lots of fun. A great visual contribution to the world.

 

FIND A DOOR! Any door. And paint/finish/cover it to blend in or match. Or make a statement!

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Many thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Budget Cuts: Something to Work Around, and With!

$ START HERE $! 

Tools and supplies: “Buy in bulk.” They cost less that way, normally. And, you will use those brushes and roller covers every day!

Careful! That includes sandpaper, caulking, spackling, masking tape and paper, clean rags, and breathing masks. Oh well, the price has just gone up.

 

The message here: You can only do so much in order to save and show increased profits. It has always been standard policy to expense out certain unavoidable things that come off the top. If you try and change that equation, here is where “debt” shows its ugly face. But let’s not go there unless we have to do so.

 

What do you do then?

 

Every month, you will have fixed costs that have to be paid. Sometimes, there will be “additional” costs that you won’t see coming. Don’t anticipate. Plan!

 

Make sure you have a “basic” ledger for your accounts. Include “Accounts Receivable” and “Accounts Payable.” Don’t forget accounts for “Petty cash,” “insurances,” and “Taxes.”

 

Every cost, expenditure, and outlay of cash must be accounted for.

 

Here are some general guidelines to help you work through those budget cuts.

 

1. Never assume, or absorb, the cost of the needed project products and materials yourself.

Make certain that those items are paid for up front, by the customer, before the work begins. No cost to you.  Examples: Primer, paint, stain, varnish, wallcovering.

 

2. Figure in the cost of all related items. Include them in your project estimate or projection presented to, and agreed upon by, the consumer.

Try not to overlook the “small stuff.” It can add up fast, without you knowing it.  Examples: Vehicle gas, oil, and repairs; faxing, long-distance calls.

TIP: Get that agreement in writing, before you start any phase of the project.

 

3. On a weekly basis, update your ledger. Prepare payments to creditors at the same time. Generate a reliable system that works for you. One with a low margin for error.

 

4. Properly schedule and “budget” the money for equipment repair and maintenance.

Ensure that the equipment, and more expensive tools, which you count on most to do the work, will operate correctly and efficiently. When you need them! Do not let them become neglected, and inoperable.  Examples: Spray guns and hoses, compressors, power washers, scaffolding, etc.

 

5. Account for your time. That is the largest part of a budget. Generally, you can charge (1) by the “hour,” (2) as part of your “salary,” or (3) by the project. Whichever method you choose, charge according to the gross and net incomes that you require to provide for your business and personal needs.

6. Figure in  total operating cost, plus 20-30 percent profit; divide by 30. This is the amount of gross revenue that you need to pull in every day to succeed.

7. Pay your creditors promptly, and regularly.

8. Remember: Greed and irresponsibility do not make a good budget.

 

 

A painting budget is like most other budgets. Simplify it as best you can.

 

 

Build your net profit slowly over time.

 

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Stay afloat! Budget safely!  Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Paint Shop I: Organizing and Storing, Part 2: Creating a Place

Creating a place for everything in your paint shop is a challenge. Especially, if your wall and floor spaces are limited.

Other factors enter into the process: number of people that use paint shop, location of shop in proximity to main department, and other departments; volume of traffic; who’s in charge of paint shop operations (YOU?); who manages entire area.

If you are responsible for paint shop operations, take charge. Create a plan that will work for you – and those around you. And, GRID your inventory into spaces that help you do your job like the professional that you are!

 

2. Create A Place for Everything: Gridding your space into sections by category, and use.

 

A. Interior products/materials:

 

(1) Paints. Sort in order of priority, or frequency of use. Store according to areas/uses.

a. General/base products: Standard colors, general use

b. Designated areas: Guest rooms/suites, offices, front offices, lobby, front desk, corridors, public restrooms, game rooms, food courts, restaurants, computer room, health club, theatre, conference center, etc.

 

(2)  Stains/varnishes/ special finishes.  Store in safety cabinet, designed for flammable or combustible products.

a. General/base products: Standard colors, general use

b. Designated areas: Rooms/suites, offices, lobby, front desk, corridors, restaurants, theatre, conference center, etc.

 

(3) Wallcoverings, borders, murals. Store according to areas used in – and in dry area.

a. General use

b. Designated: Rooms/suites, offices, lobby, front desk, corridors, restaurants, clubs, food court, health club, spa, public restrooms, conference center, etc.

* For each, specify location, room numbers, building numbers/names, etc.

c. Tools: Roller (9-in., 3/8-in. cover); level, broad knives, seam rollers, smoothing brush, plastic smoothing tool; Paper Tiger, paper scraper, 10-in-1 tool; shower cap; dust masks, vinyl gloves.

 

(4) Prep products/supplies. Group similar items together.

a. Sandpapers, caulking tubes/guns, fillers, sanding blocks.

b. Scrapers, putty knives, steel wool, Patch sticks.

c. Solvents, thinners, removers, paint strippers.

d. Cleaning chemicals: TSP (alkaline, grease, de-glosses); denatured alcohol (cleans metal); Calgon, Downy; white vinegar (mild acid rinse);  Goof-off 2;

e. Masking paper, tapes, plastic sheeting, masking film.

 

(5) Cleaning/Clean-up Supplies. Conserve space.  TIP: Store  smaller items inside larger ones.

a. Sponges, bags of rags, buckets.

b. Trash bags – different sizes, strengths

 

(6) Protective gear/Safety items. Store gear together, in same section.

 

TIP: Keep related items together.

 

B. Exterior products/materials/supplies/tools/equipment:  Include special sections like the above in “A.”

 

(1) Paints

 a. General use:

 b. Designated: Pools, gazebos, courts, playgrounds, parks, seating, fencing, front entrance, parking, canopy, asphalt, etc.

 c. Compliance/Safety/Zoning

 

(2) Special coatings – for metal, concrete, asphalt, plastic, tile, etc.

 

(3) Exterior stains, polyurethanes, urethanes

 

(4) Prep and cleaning supplies

 

(5) Tools and equipment

 

(6) Protective gear and safety items

 

PAINT WORKSHOP STORY: My father was a superb journey painter and decorator. One of the best in the trade. And, one of the busiest! When he died suddenly in 1993, he left a major mess in his private workshop on the family’s country property. Chaos is a polite word for the disorganized piles, stacks, buckets, etc. of everything everywhere.

The job of making sense of it all – unearthing the inventory, sorting it, discarding what couldn’t be used, inventorying, labeling, organizing, then assigning a price/value to every item – fell on the grieving shoulders, hands and hearts of my mother and myself. (It didn’t help the grieving process.)

JOURNEY PAINTER’s SHOP TIP: Get your paint shop in shape. And, keep it that way. Whether it amounts to a few shelves, a mid-sized room with an adjacent workroom, or a free-standing building/shed. You’ll be glad that you did. So will everyone around you when they need to step into your shoes. Even for a day, or only an hour.

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Staying organized is much easier than you might think. Once you get used to it! Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Paint Shop I: Organizing and Storing, Part 1: Inventory Your Inventory

I learned young about paint shop operations. Part of my first job, as an apprentice painter, was keeping the paint shops – buildings – clean, inventory organized, and workshop spaces ready to use. (We did a tremendous volume of shop work: sandblasting, painting, finishing, etc.)

For a small painting contractor business, that may have been an easy job. For a major, and still growing, commercial and industrial contractor business, it meant a lot of steady work!

Every paint shop is organized differently. How well it works depends on the painter responsible for its operations. Also, it depends on how well it works for the rest of the team. Team members in the engineering or facility services department; also team members in the other departments within the organization.

When the painter responsible for the paint shop is not around, do enough people in the department know how to handle things? Painting-wise? Is everything being taken care of?

What follows is a two-section tutorial on Paint Shop Operations. Paint Shop I, starting here, covers organizing and storing. It’s divided into four parts: (1) inventory your inventory; (2) creating a place for everything; (3) putting and keeping everything in its place; and, (4) maintaining inventory lists.

 

1: Inventory your shop’s inventory – by category and subcategory.

—What do you have – types, colors, quantities, general condition?

 

A. Products/Materials:

(1) Paint – Latexes, epoxies, oils – Total no. of gallons, according to paint type, color.

(2) Finishes – Stains, varnishes, urethanes, shellac

(3) Coatings – Rust/corrosion prevention, anti-fouling, elastomeric, chemical-resistant, UV protective, waterproofing, heat-resistant

(4) Wallcoverings – Papers, vinyls, foils, flocks, textures, patterns, grasscloths; borders, murals

 

B. Preparation/Supplies:

(1) Sandpapers – What grades; total number of sheets in each grade

(2) Caulking tubes – Types (eg. for kitchen/bath, exterior); total number of each type

(3) Solvents – 1 gal. each of most used products: mineral spirits, lacquer thinners, denatured alcohol

(4) Paint tint kit – Universal tints

 

C. Work area supplies:

(1) Dropcloths – At least 3 – 4 ft. by 15 ft. for clean interior use; 2 – 4 ft. by 15 ft. for

exterior use; 2 – 16 ft. by 20 ft. for wide covering.

(2) Sheeting – 1 roll 20 ft. by 100 ft. plastic; 3+ smaller rolls

(3) Buckets, sponges – 1/2 gal., 1 gal., 2 gal., 5 gal; natural sea sponges (assorted sizes, thicknesses)

(4) Masking paper, masking tapes – 1 dozen each ¾-to 1 ½ inch masking tape.

 

D. Tools:

(1) Brushes – Assortment nylon or China bristle: 1-in., 2-in., 2 ½-in., 3-in., 4-in

(2) Rollers, roller covers – Assortment 3-in. to 12-in. rollers; ¼-in. to 1/1/2-in. naps.

(3) Paint tray, paint screen

(4) Broad knives, level, straight-edge

(5) Basic tool kit: Hammer, screwdrivers, wrench, pliers, clamps, etc.

 

E. Equipment:

(1) Spray guns, hose – Airless sprayer greater than ½ gal. perminate capacity

(2) Compressor – Greater than 6 OFM for spray painting

(3) Ladders – 1+ 24-ft. extension, 16-ft. stepladder, 5-ft. platform aluminum ladder

(4) Pressure washer – Greater than 2000 psi

(5) Garden sprayer system

 

F. Protective gear and Safety items:

(1) Boxes/ packages of disposable gloves, breathing masks

(2) Organic vapor respirator, also spare cartridges; dust mask supply, safety glasses

(3) Disposable plastic suits, hats, shoe coverings, vinyl/rubber gloves

(4) Signs: WET PAINT, CAUTION, KEEP OFF, Caution Tape

 

G. Cleaning/Clean-up Supplies:

(1) Sponges, bags of rags, buckets (2-qt. plastic), floor mops

(2) Glass/mirror cleaner, spot remover

(3) Standard trash bags, heavy duty trash bags; re-sealable plastic bags (eg. for storing hardware, switch plates)

(4) Small portable vacuum cleaner, shop vacuum; push brooms, large dustpans; dusting brushes, deck brush w/extension.

 

H. Vehicle/Golf Cart Maintenance:

(1) Car wax, upholstery cleaner

(2) Oil, tire gauge, tire pump

(3) Battery charger

(4) Small portable vacuum, combo mini-broom/dustpan

 

I. Recordkeeping, Writing, Presentations:

(1) Software programs – Excel, Outlook/Express, Word, PowerPoint, Quickbooks

(2) Printable forms and worksheets on internet

(3) Journals, ledgers, and other systems available from office supply –in-store, on-line.

 

Your Paint Shop inventory pertains to much more than a few cans of paint in your standard, frequently-used colors. It pertains to everything that you and every person in your department may need to perform painting-related tasks, work orders, projects, etc.

 

PAINT SHOP MANAGER TIP: You need to know what you have on-hand. You need to know what you’re supposed to keep on-hand. You need to know what you need to get on-hand. To be ready to go! Or, as close to that point as possible. At all times.

 

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Organize your Paint Shop. It saves lots of time. It minimizes mistakes, frustration and accidents. It cuts costs like you wouldn’t believe!

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

What to Carry on Your Painter’s Golf Cart

 golfcarts   In July, a painter with a four-star hotel and resort e-mailed me about his recently inherited golf cart. He’d just relocated from the East coast.

“Two questions: What are the must-haves, good-to-haves, etc. to carry on my cart? What should I carry to be ready for anything? With the larger property and greater flexibility and autonomy in this job comes more time management challenges.”

Golf carts are the standard mode of transportation and conveyance for hotel and other facilities’ painters, as well as engineering techs. They’re compact, and a real back saver and life saver.

They’re a necessity for (1) getting around the property fast, (2) responding promptly and efficiently to calls, (3) hauling materials, supplies and tools, (4) equipping oneself for completing scheduled and emergency tasks and projects, and, (5) performing those “other duties as needed.”

What things do you need to keep on your golf cart?                                     

1. The 24/7 basics

A. Products and materials: Joint compound mix, caulking, light-weight spackling, paint, texture patch, interior/exterior paint for touch-up work.

B. Supplies: No. 120 and No. 220 sandpaper, masking tape (3/8-inch, 1-inch, 1 ½-inch), masking paper, steel wool, “WET PAINT” signs, small bag of clean rags; dropcloths (clean), buckets.

C. Tools: Drywall pan, 6-inch knife, 10-inch knife, multi-sized screwdrivers, portable drill, drywall hand saw, caulking gun, assorted paint brushes and roller covers, utility knife, roller frame and screen, roller extension poles, wire brush, paint strainer.

D. Protective gear: Safety glasses, disposable bodysuits, gloves, rubber gloves, respirator, dust masks.

E. Disposal/garbage things: Plastic bags, rolls of paper towels.

2. Add: Painting-related work order essentials

A. Spray cans of fast drying primer (white, gray), latex caulking, joint compound

B. Small notebook

3. Add: Painting project essentials

A. Roll of plastic, garbage container, circulating fan, “CAUTION” Tape.

4. Add: Special painting and decorating project essentials

A. Sponges, cheese cloth, tack cloths, plastic wrap, masking tape

B. Glazing liquid, linseed oil, paint thinner, various faux finishing brushes

5. Add: Handy-to-have along items

A. Masking machine, heat gun, wallpaper steamer

B. Broom and dustpan, vacuum cleaner (portable, battery-operated)

6. Add: Engineering and maintenance tech basic supplies

A. Replacement parts for bathtub, sinks, electrical, light bulbs

B. Paint to touch up walls where necessary, caulking for tubs, sinks and counter-tops

C. Hammer, wrench, pliers, 2-4 clamps, sealant glue

D. Level, tape measure, picture hanging clips/fasteners

 7. Add: Containers, holders, etc. to keep things organized

A. Large portable tool container

B. Plastic tray (s) for small parts

Okay! What things should NOT be carried around on your work golf cart?

1.  Air compressor, pressure washer

2.  Anything that protrudes out from cart’s side or back, creating safety issue

3.  CAUTION: Hazardous materials should be removed from your cart as quickly as possible. Never leave them on the cart, when it is left unattended, or overnight.

TIPS FOR KEEPING YOUR GOLF CART CLEAN, AND LOOKING FINE!

1. Once a week

. Wash your golf cart and wipe dry with a clean, soft rag.

. Wipe down all other areas to keep them looking clean.

. Clean the windshield – as often as needed. Include windows, if cart is enclosed.

. Vacuum the floor, back areas, etc.

. Straighten out your supply and tool areas, while you’re at it.

. As a final touch, give the steering wheel and column, dashboard, etc. a good cleaning with a couple of disinfecting wipes.

2. Once a month, or more often

. Clean the seat upholstery. Spray on all-purpose auto upholstery product, or mixture of 1 part mild vinegar to 2-3 parts water. Wipe dry.

. Wipe down all surfaces.

3. Every six months

. Apply a coat of car/truck wax on metal surfaces. Buff out with soft rag/cloth.

. Apply a similar wax on plastic areas, such as the canopy.

A FEW GOLF CART SAFETY SUGGESTIONS…

1. Make sure the batteries are fully charged every day.

2. Check the tires for proper inflation at least once a week.

3. Always carry the ignition key with you. Never leave it in the cart.

4. Always park your loaded up cart as close as possible to your working area.

* CAUTION:  An unattended golf cart can be an “inviting enticement.”

CLOSING TIP:

What you carry on your cart depends a lot on your listed job description. Also, it depends on the other things that you may be responsible for handling. It depends on the size of the property. And, it depends on how much running you want to do – back and forth between your paint shop and the locations on your “to-do” list for the day or week.

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Enjoy your day!  Enjoy your life! And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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