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Posts tagged ‘tools’

Changes and Advancements in Hotel/Facility Painting, Part 3: Supplies, Tools and Equipment

Introduction

 
The standard types of painting tools and equipment will always be in use, as long as the paint products go unchanged in how they are applied. Paint spray equipment applications are not to be replaced. They are only approved upon by making subtle changes to spray guns and paint pumping systems.

When it relates to the roller cover, its design is continually being re-examined for ways to improve its performance, primarily with new materials. Widely used tools and equipment are difficult to replace. Changes in supplies mean costly changes to a system which is already operating efficiently.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Supplies:

A. Abrasives, caulking, patching compounds, masking materials, and other items. Changes: meet the demands of structural components and newer surfaces, also environmental changes.

B. Sanding products produced for wet or dry use. Option: Abrasives affixed to a sponge type substrate, allowing greater flexibility.

C. Caulking produced as waterborne and siliconized. Advantages: Resist cracking, and provide waterproofing, while allowing the surface to be painted.

D. Patching compounds that dry faster and harder. Advantages: sand easier, allow painting sooner.

E. Masking tapes designed to be left on the surface longer. Advantages: Do not pull the surface loose, and make re-taping unnecessary.

 

Comments about Supplies:

Commonly used supplies have advanced little. They tend to fulfill the need, in an efficient manner, for which they have been designed.

The quality of supplies must not be overlooked. They are your aid in producing a quality painting or finishing job. They sure can make it easier. By the way, a poorly adhering masking tape is not going to do you any favors.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Tools:

A. More paint brushes designed for applying multiple types of coating. Brush hairs are a composite of nylon, polyester, olefin, and other synthetic fibers.

B. Roller frames designed to reduce the friction of the roller covers. Added feature: control the covers from slipping off of the roller frames.

C. Roller covers, with new developments in nap composition. Advantages: Optimal nap composition which lasts longer, and is durable with various coatings.

D. Advancements that consider the ergonomics of a tool’s use. Example: Joint knife, which must be very strong and flexible. It must provide an excellent grip and balance for effective use.

 

Comments about Tools:

Advancements in tools are needed, especially when a product or material has no way of being applied. A tool must be designed, tested, fabricated, and marketed to industry, business and public consumers.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Equipment:

 A. Fine finishing, hand-held and airless portable spray system. Designed for ease of use by the professional painter and finisher. Homeowner/general consumer models: easier to operate, clean, and maintain.

B. Masking machines that are easy to manipulate in taping procedures. Normally for commercial, residential and automotive painting.

C. Spray pumps designed for easier use by the homeowner/general consumer market. Features: lighter weight, easy to set up, simple to clean up. Pressure fluid: maintained electronically.

 

Comments about Equipment:

Changes in equipment occur when use and testing point to an area of design which can be improved. I consider advancements, something which really alters the marketing of a piece of equipment.
What marks a more advanced piece of equipment? Some key features: greater performance, more energy efficient, more ergonomics, and increased durability.

 

Closing Comments about Painting Supplies, Tools and Equipment:

A successful painting project requires that all intended and needed supplies, tools and equipment are available, reliable and qualitative. Consistently, they must help the painter to (1) produce above-standard workmanship, (2) achieve satisfactory-plus results, and (3) ensure cost-effective durability.

 

PAINTER’S TIPS: Wisely choose each supply, tool and piece of equipment. Then, care and maintain each one properly. Maximize its potential usefulness and effectiveness on future projects, work orders and tasks. You’ll be glad that you did.

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Even the most advanced supply, tool, or piece of equipment is only as effective as the painter using it.

Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2014, 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

More Custom Carriers for Painter’s Tools

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Custom Designed Carriers for Painter’s Supplies and Tools

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Sometimes, you need a carrier customized to fit the supplies you rely on.

Here are some pieces that I’ve built. Each took one to three hours to complete. All at minimum expense.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Painting Them: Theatres and Entertainment Areas

An area meant for entertainment should look the part.

 

All design elements should add to the total atmosphere. Every color, textile, and finish should serve as a backdrop for, or complement to, the theatre screen or stage area.

 

Special features: Low-dim-dark lighting; top acoustics; track lighting, colored lights; music for all types of moods – and sets the mood for movie or activity.

Construction elements: Create angles to walls and ceiling. Install cornices and crown molding; a multi-step wall base. Add a couple of columns for interest.

Design elements: Complementary toned-down installations: Seating upholstery/fabric, flooring, chrome. Gloss-over ceilings. TIP: Carpeting with subdued graphic design.

Special needs: Flat, non-reflective and non-distracting finishes and coverings on all surfaces and areas. Large, legible signage – eg. exit, traffic patterns, seating areas. Very accessible seating.

TIP: Bannisters, rails, etc. painted to be very visible for holding onto, and walking in dark area.

Color schemes: Complementary colors/tints/shades; soft earth tones with bright accent colors.

TIP: Bright colors work great in small areas.

Wood finishing: Bright colored stains, instead of earth tone colors.

Wallcoverings: Panoramic mural, abstract or realist; carpet wallcoverings; solid, or vertical-striped monochromatic textured panels, hung in alternate sections.

 

A FEW HOW-TO TIPS  

 

  1. Repair and maintenance: Re-glue loose wallpaper seams. Wash wallcoverings regularly; vacuum if wall carpeting used. Regularly, wash all metal surfaces – eg. chair arms, railings.
  2. Prepping: Sand all surfaces. Spackle small holes. Caulk all cracks.
  3. Painting and finishing: Ceilings – Flat latex or enamel. Decorating idea: Midnight blue like night sky, then glitter spray or hand-paint in stars. Walls – Dark tones, solid, complementary or monochromatic. Columns – Flat or eggshell enamel. Faux finish for style – eg. marbleizing, sponging, etchings.
  4.  Wallcoverings: Walls – Dark tones, same color or complementary. Columns – Cover in same wallcovering used on walls, to blend into décor. Use contrasting covering to make area stand out.
  5. Products, supplies, tools, equipment: Tools – Smoothing brushes; razor blade/ broad knives.
  6. Challenge: Preventing/reducing reflection of surfaces. Using wallcoverings that absorb the sound. Finding paints that add appeal and ambience, maximize durability, and tone down other surfaces (eg. railings).

 

The ambience of a theatre or entertainment area plays a vital role in its appeal, use, and popularity.

 

Are you the painter and decorator responsible for this area? Aim for top-quality prepping, painting and finishing, and maintenance results. So good that, when the lights are UP, persons see great workmanship, smooth surfaces, “seamless” wallcovering seams. A memorable scene!
Keep in mind: Many people use, and are associated with, these areas. Having surfaces that are low maintenance and very durable is essential. And, cost-effective in the long-term!

 

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“Let us entertain you” includes the surfaces, as well as what’s on the screen, or on the stage.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

 

Painting Budget Cuts: Something to Work Around, and With!

$ START HERE $! 

Tools and supplies: “Buy in bulk.” They cost less that way, normally. And, you will use those brushes and roller covers every day!

Careful! That includes sandpaper, caulking, spackling, masking tape and paper, clean rags, and breathing masks. Oh well, the price has just gone up.

 

The message here: You can only do so much in order to save and show increased profits. It has always been standard policy to expense out certain unavoidable things that come off the top. If you try and change that equation, here is where “debt” shows its ugly face. But let’s not go there unless we have to do so.

 

What do you do then?

 

Every month, you will have fixed costs that have to be paid. Sometimes, there will be “additional” costs that you won’t see coming. Don’t anticipate. Plan!

 

Make sure you have a “basic” ledger for your accounts. Include “Accounts Receivable” and “Accounts Payable.” Don’t forget accounts for “Petty cash,” “insurances,” and “Taxes.”

 

Every cost, expenditure, and outlay of cash must be accounted for.

 

Here are some general guidelines to help you work through those budget cuts.

 

1. Never assume, or absorb, the cost of the needed project products and materials yourself.

Make certain that those items are paid for up front, by the customer, before the work begins. No cost to you.  Examples: Primer, paint, stain, varnish, wallcovering.

 

2. Figure in the cost of all related items. Include them in your project estimate or projection presented to, and agreed upon by, the consumer.

Try not to overlook the “small stuff.” It can add up fast, without you knowing it.  Examples: Vehicle gas, oil, and repairs; faxing, long-distance calls.

TIP: Get that agreement in writing, before you start any phase of the project.

 

3. On a weekly basis, update your ledger. Prepare payments to creditors at the same time. Generate a reliable system that works for you. One with a low margin for error.

 

4. Properly schedule and “budget” the money for equipment repair and maintenance.

Ensure that the equipment, and more expensive tools, which you count on most to do the work, will operate correctly and efficiently. When you need them! Do not let them become neglected, and inoperable.  Examples: Spray guns and hoses, compressors, power washers, scaffolding, etc.

 

5. Account for your time. That is the largest part of a budget. Generally, you can charge (1) by the “hour,” (2) as part of your “salary,” or (3) by the project. Whichever method you choose, charge according to the gross and net incomes that you require to provide for your business and personal needs.

6. Figure in  total operating cost, plus 20-30 percent profit; divide by 30. This is the amount of gross revenue that you need to pull in every day to succeed.

7. Pay your creditors promptly, and regularly.

8. Remember: Greed and irresponsibility do not make a good budget.

 

 

A painting budget is like most other budgets. Simplify it as best you can.

 

 

Build your net profit slowly over time.

 

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Stay afloat! Budget safely!  Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Bob The Painter’s BUCKET LIST

One Christmas, my father surprised his brother-in-law with a grey, five-gallon paint bucket, filled with basic painting supplies and tools. The scientist and engineer’s face lit with surprise – and joy.

My uncle dreaded painting anything. Particularly, on his contemporary home. He knew his limitations. Doing a good paint job was one of them. By his own admission, he took forever to get something done.

So, Dad gave him a big boost. A “hands-up.”

Here’s what my dad crammed into that bucket. Then, he drove that paint bucket, in his 4-wheel drive, full-size Suburban, through a record-breaking Indiana blizzard, to sunny Central Florida.

 

3 paint brushes – 1-inch, 2-inch, 3-inch

1 roller extension pole

2 roller frames and nap covers

1 roller pan, 1 paint screen

1 pack 220 sandpaper

1 pack 120 sandpaper

1 pack assorted sandpaper

1 sea sponge

2 rolls masking tape – ¾-inch, 1 ½ -inch

1 putty knife

1 scrub brush

2 paint scrapers – 1-inch, 3-inch

1 quart container paint thinner

1 package breathing masks

1 package disposable (surgical) gloves

1 9-ft. x 12-ft. dropcloth

6+ Glidden wood mixing/dip sticks

1 white painter’s utility apron

1 Glidden painter’s cap

 

Topping off the bucket was a white regulation painter’s safety helmet. And, a massive red bow.

 

I’m certain that, over time, my uncle used some of the items in that bucket. More than once.

 

Still, within six months of my move to Florida, he asked me to paint the interior of his home. I turned him down.

 

Painting anything was not on my bucket list at the time. Painting anything – the idea of using any painting trade supply or tool – reminded me too much of the man that had filled that bucket for his brother-in-law. The man that had filled my first painter’s tool box with everything I’d need to get started.

 

The man that had given me my own white regulation hard hat!

 

It took me a little while to pick up a brush again. It was not a Purdy or Wooster.

I started with artist brushes, acrylic paints, white Gesso, stretched canvases, a paint tray, a scraper, a tri-pod, etc.  Instead of painting walls, I painted on canvas. Examples: Abstracts, geometrics, graphics. My biggest project: A 36-inch by 42-inch reproduction, in acrylics, of The Lord’s Supper.”

 

Little by little, I unpacked my boxes of commercial painter’s supplies and tools. I went around and introduced myself to the managers of Glidden’s, Sherwin-Williams, and PPG stores in South Florida. I volunteered, and redecorated a few properties of relatives and their friends, churches, and non-profits. I signed up at the nearest IUPAT local. And, I returned to the commercial painting profession.

 

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What’s on your painter’s – and life’s – BUCKET LISTS?

 

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Training Engineering/Maintenance Techs Basic Commercial Painting Skills and Methods

Introduction:

Mechanical repairs for a Maintenance Tech are no less important than the appearance of the room or space that you seek to improve. Surface repairs and painting can be learned to a point where you are as confident in doing it, as you are in performing your normal duties.

Building skills as a painter/tech requires the ability to respond to a wide variety of conditions. You want to be ready to use appropriate methods of painting to improve the appearance of a commercial business. You want everyone to be satisfied with the work: guests, visitors, customers, supervisors, management, and yourself.

 

1. What every tech needs to know about the painting trade.

 

A. Standard methods and techniques continue to work, when they match the criteria for which they were developed: surface/substrate, product/material, tools, equipment, environment.

B. Paint store managers, manufacturer’s reps, and interior designers tend to be excellent resources.

C. Many standard methods and techniques can be adapted – when used skillfully and carefully.

D. Surfaces should be touched-up, when you know the exact paint used before – or you are very skilled at mixing, matching and blending products, colors and textures.

E. For best results, the existing area should be blended with the touch-up or newly painted area.F. Before painting, the area should be prepared, so the new application matches the surface.

F. To preserve brushes, roller covers, work container, etc., clean them at the end of each day.

G. When finished, the work areas must be kept tidy and clean – guest room, walkway, paint shop

2. What every tech needs to know about painting and finishing products, in general.

 

A. Three main categories of products include waterborne (water-based), solvent borne(oil/petroleum-based), and catalyst  activated (eg. epoxy, urethane).

B. Generally, these products are composed of latexes, oils, urethanes, epoxies, and polyurethanes.

C. Many more types of products are available.

D. Products are designed for interior, exterior, and both interior/exterior applications.

 

3. What every tech needs to know about hotel/facility painting.

 

A. Touch-up paint color/tint that you use must match the paint on adjacent surfaces.

B. Some work orders can’t wait until you complete your current project or task.

C. Your chief engineer is your supervisor – not any other department manager.

D. When you stand in for the painter, both he and your supervisor are counting on you to do a good job – and to follow the rules and procedures.

E. Advance notice of the designated work areas, and “WET PAINT” use must be given to others.

F. Making note if more paint, supplies, etc. are needed helps you get job done on schedule.

 

4. What every tech needs to know to handle priority painting work orders.

 

A. Clearly understand what’s needed, also any limits – eg. time, budget, non-budgeted needs.

B. Select products/materials, tools, etc. based on need, inventory, budget/cost, time, traffic, etc.

C. Select method or technique based on surface/substrate and condition, location, time limit, etc.

D. Always give notice of painting to supervisor and/or other department managers (housekeeping, front desk) that room is to be put “OUT OF ORDER.”

E. Any work area – guest room, public restroom, restaurant, pool area, etc. – must be unoccupied, or “OUT OF ORDER” to complete the work safely and satisfactorily.

 5. TIPS: Training techs to perform basic painting tasks professionally.

 

A. Respect each tech’s unique set of skills and abilities, and known limitations.

B. Ask where, when and how they got painting their experience. (Basic information)

C. Find out the type(s) of painting projects they have worked on. What did they do? How often? For how long? Which were under no…little …a lot of supervision?

D. Assume they know the basic brush and roller techniques for materials to be used.

E. SHOW THEM the proper paints for specific areas.

F. Ensure that all techs, who will do paint-shop work, can repair areas that need to be painted.

 

6. TIPS: Training techs basic painting – the journey-apprentice way.

 

A. Work side-by-side with each trainee to ensure continuity in his or her workmanship.

B. Help each tech to find his or her comfort level using required methods, products, tools, etc.

C. Provide techs with tools of quality equal to those used by a journey instructor, or painter.

D. SHOW techs the basic methods of repairing wall damages on different surfaces and areas.

E. SHOW techs the proper way to spray paint a large surface. Include safety requirements.

 

Closing Comments:

An engineering/maintenance tech’s painting savvy will be only as sharp as the quality of his or her training; access to needed products, materials, supplies, and tools; and on-going support (departmentally and interdepartmentally).

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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