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Posts tagged ‘wallcoverings’

Painting It: Hotel/facility painter and custom finishes

Ordinarily, a hotel/facility painter will not be expected to restore or maintain custom finishes applied by fine artists. Example: Front lobby’s faux marbleized columns and fascia, done during original construction.

 

That job might change, however, when:

 

  1. management/owners want the job done, and will not contract for fine craftsmen to do it;
  2. something must be done about area, and the painting/decorating budget is frozen for the rest of the year;
  3. necessary repairs and replacement to the area – due to rain/water leak, major mold infestation, structural aging, fire damage – force a “restorative” level of painting.
  4. major reconstructive/upgrading requires “blending” old, original finishes with newly applied ones. Particularly in high traffic, frequently used areas – eg. luxury suites, conference centers, entertainment room.
  5. Management issues an order for you to maintain, duplicate, or restore custom finished surfaces/areas.

 

So, what do you do, when you’ve never applied a fine finish – not even in apprenticeship school?

 

SIX + ONE + THREE TIPS TO HELP YOU GET THE JOB DONE RIGHT!

 

  1. Create a sample board, made of the same construction material as the surface involved. Do a super job of duplicating the problematic finish on the surface/area. Repair, prepare and refinish by following the same steps you’d use on the real surface.
  2. Once both you and management are satisfied with the result on that sample board, find the most obscure and worst small section of the area to be redone.
  3. Repair, replace and refinish that section using the identical technique, products, supplies, and tools used on that sample board.
  4. If possible, let that refinished area stand for at least five full days. Preferably longer. See how it appears to you. Compare your redone section to the finish on the overall area.
  5. Encourage management and the big shots to take several look-sees. Invite a few very observant teammates to check it out, too.
  6. Get a written “special project order” signed and dated by the hotel’s/facility’s top management officer. Your supervisor’s order to proceed is not good enough. This approved order must include the following:

A. Project scheduling and completion date, based on your availability and regular work responsibilities (that you will still have to get done during this time);

B. List of all needed products, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment – as required;

C. Pre-signed and pre-dated requisitions for delivery of all needed items in “B.”

D. A “no interference and no changes statement,” leaving authority with you.

E. Statement about cordoning/securing entire work area for the time that you require;

F. A “project delay start date”, if management has not had required products, materials, etc. delivered according to agreed upon schedule.

 

ONE SCHEDULING TIP: Slot out time thirty days out from project start date, if possible. This gives everyone the ability to get their respective ducks in a row. You, teammates, supervisor(s), management, purchasing, suppliers, etc.

 

THREE SUCCESS TIPS:

 

  1. Do your best to work ahead on your regular tasks, work orders and projects. Hint: With your supervisor, do a weekly “walk through” to make sure you’re both covering the basics.
  2. One week out: Meet with your supervisor. Include teammate(s) that will be covering for you in getting regular work done. NOTE: By this point, the list of “to do’s” will have been agreed upon between you and your boss.
  3. One week out: Closely check your project inventory. Run through the list of products, materials, supplies, etc. Is everything ready? Has everything been delivered?

 

BOTTOM LINE: Keep in mind that you’re really at the mercy of management. Too often, what they say they want is not matched by their compliance to their part of the deal. Tread carefully, my friends!

 

FINAL NOTE – and CAUTION

I’m a stickler when it comes to “special projects” that flow from the desks of management. I never start one of these projects on the fly. And, I never proceed with any “special project” that everyone involved has not, in advance, committed to in writing!

 

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Certain faux finishing projects need to be redone by the experts.

And, you are not they, if you don’t know a lot about this specialized art form.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s View: How a hotel can move more “upmarket”

It can take a big chunk out of the budget to move a hotel into a higher position in the marketplace. Usually, special funds must be allocated for that purpose. And, many independent operations don’t have that kind of capital to invest.

 

Still, they need to do something drastic to appeal to a clientele that will pay more and spend more. And, hopefully, return more often.

 

Thirteen ways that a painter can help move his hotel “upmarket”

 
1. Demonstrate to management what a color scheme change can do, even for just exterior accenting and trim.

 

2. Choose, say 20, rooms to start. And, decorate each with a specific theme.

Example: Countryside – Use template to stamp rose motif on walls, to create fake “dado.”

TIP: Coordinate each theme with the hotel’s overall image.

Examples: nautical, Americana, oriental, European, southwestern.

 

3. A change in color scheme and application of a simple faux finish on one wall costs very little, and easy to do.

Example: Soft tones create a fresh, airy feel.

 

4. Apply a “frottage” effect over dado to team with wallpaper, or the plain painted surface on the lower wall.

Example: Soft green is restful and peaceful.

 

5. Stencil and paint special motifs in hotel’s current color scheme on the walls of children’s lofts or rooms in family suites.

TIP: Printed wallpaper borders work great, too.

 

6. Sand, then stain “distressed” wood furniture pieces in colors that blend with paint colors of walls.

Examples: Headboards, bedside tables, mirror/picture frames, desks, writing tables.

 

PROJECT NOTE: For one hotel, I sanded the heavily scratched and faded wood chairs in the family restaurant. Then I applied a slightly different color of stain on each chair. The effect: An exciting, fun look!

 

7.  Sand, then apply two coats of gloss paint on the tops only of older wooden tables throughout the property. Select complementary colors that, together, will brighten the day for guests and staff.

Examples: Front lobby, front offices, restaurants, foot court, guestrooms, meeting rooms.

TIP: Get very creative. Apply faux marble effect, paint checkerboard pattern.

 

PROJECT NOTE: For one art décor hotel, I decorated some small table tops with a wood inlay pattern.

 

8. Brighten up the pool/gazebo/bar area. Spray paint each table a slightly different hue or tint of the same color, from the hotel’s color scheme.

 

9. Or, keep the tables the same color. And spray paint one chair at each table a slightly different hue or tint of a color, used in the area already.

Example: If the area’s color scheme is “tropical” yellow, lime green, aqua, and melon, paint one chair at each table in a little lighter hue of one of these colors.

 

10. Do you have columns at the lobby entrance, or pool area entrance? On all columns, “wrap around” a stripe in a lighter hue of a color from the hotel’s signature color scheme. TIP: Paint the nearby entrance benches in a slightly darker tint of the same color.

 

11. Apply two coats of gloss paint onto the worn park benches around the property.

TIP: For great attention getters, paint each in a different color, from the hotel’s overall color scheme. The effect: Electrifying!

 

12. Create honor walls in public areas of buildings. Examples: “Hotel’s History,” “Staff Honors,” “Children’s PROArt Gallery.”

Example: Front lobby, corridor to a restaurant, conference center hallway.

 

13. Get hold of a lot of picture frames, different sizes. Paint each one in a striking color, that contrasts with the wall color where the frames will be hung. A different hue of the wall color works great, too.

 

Painter’s Power Point: Many of these touches can be achieved by tinting extra paint that you already have in the paintshop. When your budget is tight, or even frozen, look at what you have. Set aside what you need to keep for basic work orders and projects. And, little by little, liven up the place.

 

PROJECT NOTE: On one project, I actually enlisted the creative talents of two hotel staff members who loved to paint! A housekeeping supervisor and an online sales person. They helped a couple of hours, after their regular work hours, for at least five days. They had a great time, and did a great job!

 

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Staff painters can help “upmarket” their property by treating surfaces to a change!

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Stay cool and calm, everyone. Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Public, Private and Special Collection Libraries

Working on a library project offers some unique opportunities for a skilled painter and decorator to really stretch himself or herself to the outer limits.

 

I’ve worked on over nine libraries. Four of them were new construction projects. Five were major renovation or restoration projects.

 
1. Smallest library. A 2-story, 14,000 square feet brick building dating back to the 1820s. Originally a mansion, the structure had gone through several previous major repairs and conversions since being donated for the county public library.

Project: It involved a carpentry crew ripping out over 40 percent of the structure’s walls. Then they reconfigured that space to accommodate for the current and projected patrons’ changing needs and preferences.

My job: I helped install commercial wall vinyl on 75 percent of the walls. On the remaining walls, we installed carpet tiles, custom cut to a template design. Also, we repaired and filled, then re-stained and re-varnished all of the wood (mostly walnut) surfaces. That included cornices, dado, wainscoting, carved moulding and trim; stair railings and banisters; elevator exteriors and interiors; built-in seating areas and bookcases in special collection rooms.

 
2. Largest library. A 3-story, 48,000 square feet steel and glass framed university structure. The new construction project featured an interior atrium hallway on each level, between the outer shell and outer walls of every interior room.

Project funding: Two unrelated alumni had donated 60 percent of the total cost.

My job: I helped install nine wrap around murals. Also, three of us hung over 30,000 square yards of commercial vinyl. And, we painted or stained and clear coated just about every other surface. Mainly interior trim and molding, and cabinetry.

 

3. Most unique library. A special collections private library. Housed in a 2-story limestone and mortar structure, the 32,000 square feet original structure, built around 1897, had been used as a private children’s boarding school.

Building features: 12-to-16 feet high walls and many rotunda/recessed ceilings with hand-carved wooden insets; miles of mahogany and dark oak wood in dismal disrepair, and water damaged; built-in wood/glass display cases with carved pediments and stationary shelving, fully paneled enclosed mini reading/study rooms; five larger meeting rooms – paneled walls.

My job: Mainly, I repaired wood surfaces and areas, then re-stained and clear varnished.

Fun element: The children’s playroom had been preserved. The new owners of the library contracted separately three of us to fully restore the 18 feet wide by 42 feet long room.

 
4. Most beautiful library. A private law firm’s office, 2-story, approximately 26,000 square feet. Major remodeling project.

Features: A lot of expensive Cherrywood paneling, columns and arches, decorative moulding, dado (chair rails), and ornately carved bannisters.

My job: Our 2-men crew prepped and finished all surfaces. We installed three large rotunda custom murals – all forest and wild animal scenes; stained and clear coated large built-in cabinetry, also two paneled elevators (interiors/exteriors).

 

5. Most challenging library. A very large public high school.

My job: Our 3-men crew removed over 15, 000 square feet of wall vinyl, then reinstalled new five monochromatic colors of “Pebble” vinyl including inside 15 built-in, lighted display cases.

Note: During summer break (about six months later), we were re-contracted to go back and spray a high-gloss, rust and scratch proof enamel on all metal book shelving.

 

Being an avid reader and a lifetime library patron, I’ve enjoyed working on every library. Regardless of its type, size, condition, and complexity. Of course, some of the projects stretched me much further than I’d bargained for.

 

Bottom line on library projects: Know what you’re doing. Take on detail and finishing work surfaces and areas you are confident in handling. Push for the best quality supplies, tools and equipment that the budget will allow. And, don’t let anyone – especially the client – push you into applying products and materials faster than the manufacturers advise, and that you can guarantee quality results!

 

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Painting and finishing libraries can put your industry knowledge, application patience and surface wisdom to the test.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Remodeling, Retrofitting and Redecorating for an 81-Year Old “Roommate”

 

A literary agent, with whom I’ve become acquainted, lives in a hotel penthouse in Manhattan. She calls it the smartest investment that she’s ever made.

 

The woman protects her investment by self-paying for the remodeling, and the painting and decorating, of the 4,500 square foot property.

 

She keeps a small, by comparison, 2,000 square foot apartment in South Florida. On the top floor of an ocean front hotel. She self-pays for the painting and decorating of that property, too.

 

Both homes are decorated in light-toned natural woods, fibers and colors. And relaxing patterns.

* Woods: Oak, pine, olive ash, and sycamore.

* Fibers: Leather, chenille, chintz, and cords.

* Colors: Ivory, ecru, soft coral, muted lime green, and pale turquoise.

* Patterns: Narrow stripes, one-half to one-inch checks, and small block prints; subdued geometrics, pastel floral garden prints.

 

Both homes are furnished and accessorized with an eclectic collection of pieces from the Midwest. Some have been inherited or “gifted” from relatives. Others have been purchased from small antique and second-hand shops in western Ohio and eastern Indiana.

 

What stands out about the person is what also stands out about her homes. (And her office.) A practical, understated and low-stress approach to business, relationships, and life.

 

In 2015, the 30+ year publishing veteran started to remodel both her New York City and Miami homes. They are being retrofitted to accommodate her new roommate: her 81-year old mother.

 

The younger woman runs three miles every day. The older woman hand-pushes her wheelchair or walker around every foot, every day.

 

In some ways, their lives couldn’t be more different. In most ways, starting now, their schedules couldn’t be more in sync. And, their needs and preferences couldn’t be more unique.

 

The same woods and colors are being used, as before. Some fibers will change.

 

All structural impediments are being removed: steps, stairs, raised/lowered floor areas, landings; protruding walls, sharp corners, barriers, protrusions. Doorways are being widened to at least 42 inches. All doors will open outward, from whichever side a person is approaching. Also, they will open by a touch pad, or remote-controlled beam.

 

What the literary agent calls “ballet bars” – actually padded safety bars – are being installed along every walkway, wall, base cabinetry unit/section, etcetera. Also in every bathtub and shower, the outdoor patio, etc.

 

All plush carpeting has been removed, and will be replaced with tightly-woven commercial grade floor covering. Like you find in fine restaurants, hotels and resorts, hospitals, business complexes.

 

All sinks, cupboards, countertops, appliances, fixtures, commodes, etc. are being lowered or raised to ease their use.

 

All upholstered pieces will be outfitted with washable, rubber-backed, and soft snugly-fitting slipcovers. All window treatments and systems – shades, blinds, curtains, drapes – will be controlled by remote, or by hand. So will all fixtures – eg. lighting, faucets. So will all cabinet, drawer, closet, and appliance doors.

 

The idea is to help make both homes as livable as possible for both “roommates.” To make accommodations for impairments, special needs, and even future limitations natural and easy to use. While making the preferences of each resident an important part of the “blended lifestyle”!

 

As the daughter and homeowner puts it, “I want to provide a very safe and secure home. And a sanctuary for now, and the future. For both of us…”

 

On the day that I stood inside the Florida apartment, rain pelted against the French doors, that led to the extra wide patio. Through the haze, I could see the ocean waves rolling into shore.

 

“It’s all so beautiful,” a soft voice, weakened by age and illness, remarked from beside me. “A very different, but good beautiful from our old home in Ohio.”

 

The lady sat in her wheelchair. A fleece-lined pants and hooded jacket in soft daffodil yellow kept her cozy. She peered through her new pair of binoculars.

 

“What a place! If Daddy (her husband) could see us now!”

 

“Wait till our Florida place is completely remodeled, retrofitted and redecorated, Mom.”

 

What an honor to be a part of such a special project.

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Accommodating for others’ needs and preferences also accommodates for our own.

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Thanks for being a part of the world of “life” and for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paola the Painter’s As Told-To Story from Madrid

 

For her fifteenth birthday, Teresa wanted “patriotic” walls. The colors of her country, Spain: Red and Gold. In two weeks, she was having a sleep-over. She wanted her bedroom to be perfect.

 

So, her father, Mario, called his brother, Stefan, at the hotel, where he worked as Concierge II.

 

“Leave this to me,” Stefan told his brother.

 

Two days later, Paola, house painter, arrived at the two-story flat on Av de Pablo, near Retiro District, in Madrid. He carried an arm load of empty boxes into the house.

 

Clearing out the space…

 

He removed the teenager’s posters and pictures, taped to the walls of her room. He placed her treasures into boxes. He removed the sheets, coverlet and pillows from her bed, and put them safely into the largest box.

 

Paola rolled up Teresa’s faded green rug. He pushed her furniture to the center of the room. He covered them with “three large old sheets.”

 

Next, he hurried down to his economie automobile. He returned, carrying supplies: three buckets of paint, brushes, a roller, and three covers; a large dropcloth; a new 6-foot stepladder; and, a long narrow cardboard box. A curious, retired neighbor man volunteered to help.

 

The painter stretched out the dropcloth, careful to cover the wood floor from corner to corner. He began to ready his supplies.

 

Teresa’s Surprise No. 1…

 

Teresa returned home late that evening. After her classes, and part-time job at the family la panaderia (bakery). Wide painter’s masking tape stretched across the doorway of her room. A large sign was posted onto the door.

 

“Teresa, Sleep with your sister tonight. Love, Mama and Poppo.”

 

Paola began the work…

 

First, he dusted, sanded and wiped off every surface to be finished.

 

Next, Paola painted…

 

  1. He painted the top half of three walls a “delicate” Yellow Gold. Equivalent to Lily SW 6693. In semi-gloss latex

 

  1. Then, he painted the bottom. half of three walls. Walls 1 and 2: “Deepened Red.” Equivalent to Real Red SW 6869; Wall 3: “Deepened Sun Gold. “ Equivalent to Glitzy Gold SW 6691.

 

  1. He installed wallpaper on Wall 4: Narrow bright Yellow-Gold stripes on bright White background. (Paper had subtle sheen.)

 

  1. Next, mid-way on all four walls, he nailed in place railing strips. Painted bright White. The railing was Paola’s personal gift to Teresa.

 

  1. Last, he painted the door frame, window trim, and baseboards that same “lightened” Yellow Gold, SW 6693. Paint: High-gloss latex.

 

Teresa’s Birthday Surprise…

 

By the time Teresa returned home from classes the next day, a big surprise waited. Her mother and sister smiled. Her father sat in the kitchen, waiting.

 

“Hi, Mama. Poppo, you’re early from work. Did something happen?” They only smiled back.

 

She walked down the hall to her bedroom. Her parents and sister followed. The sign and tape had been removed from her door. She opened the door. A loud scream filled the air.

 

“FANTASTIQUE”

 

The “patriotics” of her beloved Spain filled the room. From the ceiling to the floor.

 

The Finishing Touches to Teresa’s Room…

 

Over Teresa’s old bed laid a quilted coverlet and matching pillow shams. Fabric: Cotton Chintz. Colors and Pattern: dainty Red Carnation floral .Window curtains, made of the same fabric, hung at her tall window. The pieces were a special gift from Uncle Stefan. Paola’s wife, a seamstress, had made them.

 

Younger sister, Traci, handed her a package. “These are for you. I made them. Mama helped.”

 

Inside were three small, square pillows. One was covered in a solid Red nubby fabric, one in a solid shiny Gold, the third in a bright Lime Green.

 

Tears spilled from the teenager’s eyes. Lately, she’d been feeling overwhelmed. Unappreciated, too. (Her schedule.)

 

What a difference a little paint job made in a teenager’s life!

 

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Paint something for a young person in your life. Send a smile into her or his soul.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Them: Closets with Class

Add appeal, style and even a new life to closets, or closet alcoves, in your hotel, facility – or home.

 

1. Paint the entire area in a color that complements with the room’s color. Example: Room color: off-white, closet color: light sand.

TIP: Use up some interior paint color no longer needed, because of a property color scheme change.

 

2. Paint the most visible closet wall in the same color used in the room. Paint the side walls in a contrasting color.

 

3. Create horizontal border effect on all of the closet walls.

A. Paint lower two-third of walls the same color used in room.

B. Paint upper one-third of walls in white, or contrasting color.

C. Or, reverse it: Contrast or white on lower part, main room’s color as upper border.

 

4. Paint all walls white, or light tint of the color on room’s walls.

Install wallpaper border on the room wall outside of the closet, running it around walls inside the closet.

 

5. Install remnant wallcoverings, purchased at paint store. Mix and match.

A. Supplier tip: Check with major local contractors that do a lot of wallcovering installation.

B. Shopping tip: Look for colors that complement or contrast with your regular color scheme.

C. Material tip: Look for white-on-white stripes, subtle patterns, textures that remind you of scenes/areas/amenities on your property.

D. Great find: Commercial grade products. Examples: Designs such as pebbles, grasscloths, hemps; laminated wood veneers; leathers. These wallcoverings are very durable, and usually come in wide panels. NOTE: Many tend to be heavier, and harder to handle.

 

6. Install wallpaper or vinyl on the most visible wall in the closet, or closet alcove. After painting other walls in lighter hue of nearest room wall color.

 

7. Install complementary wallcoverings on adjoining walls of closet, or closet alcove.

 

GENERAL TIPS:

Colors: Keep it/them light, and neutral.

Textures: Keep it/them durable, easy-to-clean and similar.

Patterns: Keep them complementary to others in the area, and to those used in adjoining room.

Special Effects: As creative as you can get. As creative as management will let you be.

Panel directions: Horizontal, vertical, diagonal. Whatever!

 

A CLOSET WITH A VIEW. . .

 

A relative in Ohio moved into a large corner studio in an assisted living facility. She had one window. It overlooked the end of a parking lot. She had two closets.

 

Her grandsons decided to turn the smaller closet into a work-computer space for Grandma Anne.

 

1. They installed a soft, pink-on-white vertical striped wallpaper on the room’s wall, adjacent to the window wall.

2. They installed the same wallcovering on the two side walls of the closet.

3. On the closet’s back wall, they installed a “window garden scene” panel of wallpaper, with the same pink-on-white pattern/background as the panels hung on the closet’s side walls.

4. Inside the closet, they installed a remnant white marble laminate counter.

5. On one end, they installed adjustable shelving, that faced the counter, not the doorway.

6. Under the counter, they slid in a two-drawer metal cabinet, repainted high-gloss petal pink.

7. With management’s written authorization, the grandsons ran a multiple-plug panel from the room’s nearest outlet, into the closet, on the floor. No lighting fixtures were installed in the closet. Mainly because of code regulations and property restrictions.

 

Today, Anne sits at her counter…emails family and friends…does on-line personal business…and enjoys the special outside view.

 

Closets can be great fun to decorate.

 

The creative opportunities are endless. Their smaller dimensions, standardly, make them perfect spots to use up fabulous, left-over, better or top quality products and materials. To experiment with new layouts, and techniques. To try new combinations of colors, patterns and textures.

 

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Try a closet on for size! Make each one a little unique!

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Thank you for taking an interest in your space. And for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Designing with Graphics Using Wallcoverings

 

Rainbow Farm in Vinyl

Blue Sphere

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Various types of wall covering can be applied to achieve part or all of your chosen graphic design. The possibilities are endless because a very wide selection is available.

 

About “Rainbow Farm in Vinyl”: Graphic design covers two adjacent corner walls. Overall dimensions: 42 feet length by 9 feet height. Design features abstract symbols of a modern recreation farm: buildings and structures, flowers and gardens, fields with lush crops, animals, Christmas tree nursery, vehicles. Templated symbols were cut from commercial-grade vinyls. The variety of colorful and textured remnants came from two large elementary school projects.

 

About “Blue Sphere”: Graphics free-form stripe wraps around two adjacent walls, trailing into a large walk-in closet. Overall dimensions: 12 feet-to-8 feet-to-9 feet length by 8 feet-to-6 feet height. Design features one graduated, 12-inch to 8-inch horizontal stripe. Free-style form was cut from mini-pebble textured commercial vinyl, spliced into already-installed off-white decorative stone-textured ceiling-to-floor commercial vinyl.

 

The layout is similar to the painting process. The work can be compared to doing a puzzle.

 

Before you can install the wallcovering, many pieces of various sizes and shape will have to be fashioned.

 

Each separate piece will need to be pasted with the appropriate adhesive or paste. NOTE: Some will require vinyl paste while others may need wheat or cellulose.

 

The following process is meant for the skilled paperhanger.

 

CREATING TEMPLATES FOR WALLCOVERING PIECES

 

1. Create a paper sketch of wall area.

 

2. Sketch in your design to scale.

 

3. Use grid paper, or graphic software program. Example: 1 inch = 1 foot.

A. Number each piece within design.

B. Use larger grid paper to transfer shapes to full-size.

C. Gridded architectural or engineering paper works great for this.

D. Be certain to number each piece to correspond to piece’s number in sketch.

 

INSTALLING/APPLYING WALLCOVERING PIECES INTO GRAPHIC DESIGN

 

1. To apply wallcovering to stripe areas, pre-trim pieces on zinc strip to fit.

 

2. Then, paste material. Be sure to use the paste/adhesive appropriate for that piece.

 

TIP: I’ve used small, neon-colored sticky notes to “label” front of each piece. Here’s how:

On 8 ½ inch by 14 inch paper, I’ve made a chart. I glued tiny sample of each type of wallcovering to be used. Next, I wrote the type of paste/adhesive to be used for that type of covering. Then, I assigned a neon color sticky note to each type, and adhered one alongside the corresponding wallcovering sample.

 

3. Butt (align) the seams of the pieces and smooth out wallcovering.

 

4. When several pieces are fitted, use a straight edge and razor knife to trim excess to even out any edge or seam joint. Much patience is needed here.

 

5. Where irregular sized and shaped pieces are to fit irregular sized and shaped pieces, I recommend one or both of the following methods:

 

  1. Method 1: Pre-cut each piece.
  2. Match each piece to a template, before adhering to wall with paste/adhesive.
  3. Several pieces, that will adjoin each other, can be trimmed and matched together at the paste table before applying.

 

  1. Method 2: Overlap the seams of adjoining pieces.
  2. Double-cut through the two layers.
  3. With straight lines, trimming is easy.

 

TIP 1: When making curved or arched cuts, always make up plastic templates that precisely match the curvature of the penciled line. Normally, you will need only a half dozen to allow for the making of your other cuts.

 

TIP 2: Change your razor blades more regularly.

 

6. Smooth all wall covering in multiple directions to remove creases and bubbles.

 

7. Using a seam roller, press down all seams and edges.

 

8. Use just enough pressure to adhere the wallcovering piece to the substrate.

 

9. Work quickly while ensuring a perfect job.

 

10. Wash the seam roller as needed.

 

TIP: In some instances, it is invaluable to use special seam glue and a heat gun to manipulate the material more precisely.

 

Remember: All wall coverings are not applied using the same method.

 

TIP: If various types of coverings are used, be ready to work with each one a little differently to fit each piece of the graphics together.

 

A large graphic design project . . .

 

On one occasion, I applied a vinyl graphics design in a corridor over one hundred and fifty feet long. It turned out magnificent in the end. However, it was difficult to achieve. The entire length of the hallway set on a slope. And the stripes and curves, that made up the design, were at eye level.

 

When doing graphics using wallcovering, both patience and precision are required to achieve favorable results.

 

And remember: Create a sample first!

 

Footnote: Fortunately, creating great graphics using wallcoverings is a breeze, compared to trying to transfer media files into this post. Any tips from anyone?  Thanks in advance!

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