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Posts tagged ‘Walls’

Painting It: Choosing the Right Paint Brush

Many people believe any brush will do. On the contrary!  You will find that, in order to paint effectively, there is a specific paint brush for every need.

 

Generally, there are two types of brushes: the nylon/polyester, which is used to apply waterbourne paints and coatings, example: latex, and the China Bristle which is used to apply petroleum based solvent type materials, example: enamel.

 

 Some examples of brushes used with specific materials

 

  1. Oil based Varnish and Polyurethane: 3 inch white China bristle (preferred).

 

  1. Water based latex, acrylic clear coat: 1-4 inch nylon/polyester, 2½-3 inch (preferred).

 

  1. Oil/alkyd/enamel paints/coatings: 1½-3 inch black China bristle; 2½-3 inch (preferred).

 

  1. Epoxy/Urethane paints: 2½-3 inch black China bristle.

 

  1. Shellac-alcohol based coatings: 2½- 3 inch black China bristle.

 

  1. Ammonia based coatings: 2½ -3 inch nylon/polyester.

 

*Selecting a paint brush based on the material being used is half of the equation. One must also consider the surface or object you intend to paint.

 

Typically, you can base your selection on the size or detail of the project. Painting walls or ceilings requires a different brush than painting window trim.

 

A few examples which illustrate that fact

 

  1. Painting a Wood Door. Use a 1½-2 inch angular brush. These brushes are designed for trimming around hinges, edges and recessed panels.

 

  1. Painting a Wall or Ceiling. Use a 2½-3 inch angular brush or a 3-4 inch square brush. Use these brushes for large open flat areas with little or no detailed trim work.

 

  1. Painting an Ornamental surface. Use a 1-2½ inch angular brush, or selection of artist brushes depending on intricacy of surface or object.

 

  1. Painting Furniture. Use a 2 inch square brush with a narrow ferrule. Select a brush with fine bristles to reduce brush strokes.

 

Helpful Hints to Remember

 

  1. Always use the recommended solvent to clean your brushes. If you do not, your brush may be a one-time use only tool.

 

  1. Store brushes in a hanging container. Or lay flat with bristles wrapped in newspaper, or in the original brush protector.

 

  1. Load China bristle brushes with linseed oil to keep softened.

 

  1. Load nylon/polyester brushes with soap to keep soft.

 

  1. When cleaning paint brush bristles, use a fine wire brush to remove paint.

 

  1. Buy good quality brushes. Consider them an investment, especially if you’re a painter by trade. I recommend Purdy, Wooster and Sherwin-Williams brands.

 

A Painter’s paint brush is an essential, basic tool, like a wrench used by a mechanic. To continue to use it: keep it clean and use it as recommended.

 

One of the best paint brushes I ever used was a brush owned by my father. The brush was thirty-five years old. And, it was made by Purdy.

 

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SPECIAL THANKS: To all of the trade painters, who have been emailing or calling with requests and suggestions for “Painting with Bob.”

 

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Painting Projects: “Let’s Do It” and “Let-Me-Think-About-It”

Every project features certain elements and parameters that must be considered before it’s taken on by the painter/decorator.

 

Every project requires certain resources for the painter/decorator to achieve satisfactory results.

 
Ten “LET’S DO IT” Projects.*

 

* Projects classified by crew size needed to do job.

* Projects require definite deadline; doing projects around other things unfeasible.

 

“Let’s Do It” Projects – Crew size: 1  (Basic stuff, piece of cake!)

1. Refinish picture frames.

2. Caulk cracks in ceiling edges, and wall corners.

3. Paint an accent wall.

4. Apply wallpaper border.

5. Wood-grain a metal door.

6. Do a simple faux-finish to wall, using sponging or rag rolling technique.

7. Paint ceiling in large office.

8. Paint metal door frames.

9. Hang wallpaper in room, or office.

10. Refinish pieces of wood furniture.

 

“Let’s Do It” Projects – Crew size: 2 or 3 minimum (Need to do project safely!)

1. Paint exterior of home or office building.

2. Install commercial wallcovering in offices.

3. Paint concrete floors vs. floor.

4. Refinish large number of wood doors.

5. Paint interior walls of office/business complex.

6. Repaint acoustic ceilings.

7. Apply texture to interior walls of housing development, or business complex.

8. Apply faux finish to walls in 8 or more large offices, or multi-housing complex.

9. Hand-paint large wall mural.

10. Repaint residential development exteriors.

 

I’ve worked on each of the above projects, start-to-finish, on my own, also as part of a crew. Upon completion, every project received an “excellent” rating.

 

RELATED TIPS:

  1. Always begin a project with all of the necessary products, supplies, tools, and paint equipment readily available to you.
  2. Avoid need to leave the job multiple times. It can distract you, and slow production.

 

 

Five “LET ME THINK ABOUT IT” Projects.*  

 

* Projects classified by crew size needed to do job.

* Most projects require definite deadline; doing project around other things unfeasible.

 

“Let Me Think About It” ProjectsCrew size: 1 (Take a closer look, some red flags! )

 

1. Refinish antique furniture in faux finish application.

2. Apply stencil design to bathroom.

3. Clean and paint driveway surface.

4. Apply faux plaster finish to interior  walls in very large, older residence.

5. Texture ceilings, presently with smooth surface.

 

“Let Me Think About It” Projects – Crew size: 2 or 3 minimum (Check out closely. Might not be a good idea to take on!)

1. Paint exterior of multi-floor building.

2. Remove ceiling tiles, and paint ceiling metal grid.

3. Repaint moldings and doors in multi-housing complex.

4. Repair, prep and repaint all walls in residential or business complex.

5. Paint accent colors on walls throughout entire office or business complex.

 

 

I’ve worked on each of the above projects, start-to-finish – on my own, or as part of a small crew. Every project, upon completion, received an “excellent” rating. So, it can be done. Still, especially if you have a choice. . .

 

Food for thought: If any painter/decorator’s “Let-Me-Think-About-It” list is longer than five, he or she might want to consider specializing – whether he or she works for someone else, by the project, or for himself or herself. Or, re-think this career choice.

 

A painter and decorator needs to manage and operate his or her “project career” (my term), according to a basic set of rules and limits. One that works for that person. That includes working on projects with elements, parameters and requirements that coincide with the painter/decorator’s rules and limits. And, his or her innate value system.

 

This modus operandi, especially in the long-term, benefits everyone concerned. The guest/ visitor/ customer. The client/property owner/stakeholder. The employer or contractor. The staff or employee group. The paint team/crew. The painter and decorator.

Is There a Flaw in Your Wall? Part III: Repainting a Wall with Semi-Gloss or Gloss Paint

Recapping from Part II…

 For every type of finished surface you have in the area, there is a specific method of repair that you can follow if one of those surfaces has been damaged.

Generally, two types of repairs that can be made. The first method is the quick fix. It involves patchwork, with a little spackling or caulking. This method is suitable, if there is no real time to do the repair properly, or quality work  is not essential.

The second method of repairing a flaw in the wall involves cutting out the damaged portion of the wall or wood substrate, and replacing it with a new piece. To do this, one needs patience and a knowledge of patching methods where the surrounding surface is matched and blended to match the patched area. Having experience here will guarantee a detailed, and qualitative,  repair job. Remember: It should look like no repair was ever made.

Moving on…

Repairing a wall painted with semi-gloss or gloss paint.

One of the most difficult repairs to complete satisfactorily relates to a wall where the surface has been painted with semi-gloss or gloss paint. Have you ever seen a wall where something under the paint is magnified and stands out for all to see?  

You think,” What an eye sore.” And, you wish that you could do something about it. Usually, you don’t do anything. Common sense says “Good luck with that.” “I have no idea where to start.”

The hardest thing to do is to try and match the surrounding surface texture even if it appears to be smooth. Generally, if the surrounding area has a slightly stippled surface, the surface of your repair needs to match that as closely as possible. Then the sheen of the paint will blend in.

 Here are the steps to follow in this procedure:

    1. Begin by sanding smooth the damaged are, a using #220 or #400 sandpaper.

    2. Use a dry mix joint compound to patch the area. Wait for it to harden. You may have to make a couple of applications to complete this step.

    3. Sand in sequence in the area, with #220 and #400 sandpaper, until smooth and feather edged with surrounding wall.

    4. Apply an oil-based or latex primer with a small roller cover, 3/16or 3/8.” Make sure the paint is applied evenly over the repaired area.

    5. When dry, sand with #220 or #400 sandpaper depending on how the roller stipple dried. The patched area may have a slight difference from the surrounding wall.

    6. Now, take the #400 sandpaper and lightly sand an area which is at least twice the area of the original repair. This helps reduce the amount of flash from the difference in paint sheen.

    7. You can now apply the finish coat by using the same sized roller cover you used when priming. This time, roll the paint out past the point where you stopped sanding. Make sure the paint is rolled out thinly along the edges. This will aid in the blending process.

   8. Multiple finish coats may be need to be applied.

If everything has gone successfully and the area is now fully dry, you should be able to judge for yourself how the procedure worked. There’s a good chance that it has.

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Thanks for stopping by. Succeed at whatever you paint!

Is There a Flaw in Your Wall? Part II: How to Repair a Wall Damaged by Furniture.

Recapping from Part I…

Some wall imperfections can, and often do, occur when we are mounting pictures on the wall or moving furniture. It’s unavoidable if there is a lot of work to be done, and the walls and woodwork are completed.

Let it be known: For every type of finished surface you have in the area, there is a specific method of repair that you can follow if one of those surfaces has been damaged.

Generally, two types of repairs can be made. The first method is the quick fix. It involves patchwork, with a little spackling or caulking. This method is suitable, if there is no real time to do the repair properly, or quality work  is not essential.

The second method of repairing a flaw in the wall involves cutting out the damaged portion of the wall or wood substrate, and replacing it with a new piece. To do this, one needs patience and a knowledge of patching methods where the surrounding surface is matched and blended to match the patched area. Having experience here will guarantee a detailed, and qualitative,  repair job. Remember: It should look like no repair was ever made.

MOVING ON…

Repairing a wall damaged by a piece of furniture.

It involves making a repair to a wall where a piece of furniture was bumped against the wall, causing a minor dent in the wall finished with a custom Venetian plaster. In this procedure, the main concern becomes matching the custom plaster, once this type of repair is made.

   1.  First, sand the area around the indentation until it is perfectly flat. Use #120 sandpaper.

   2.  Mix a small amount of fast curing powdered joint compound (not the premixed spackle.)  Using a putty knife, fill the dented area so the compound rises slightly above the

   3. When dry, lightly sand the area so it blends, and is flush with the surrounding area. If there are ridges or texture, try to blend into it. You may have to use the edge of a drywall tool or rougher abrasive. Detailed workmanship is needed here. This is where your creative ability comes in.

  4. Applying a touch up using Venetian plaster can be done with a putty knife and a brush. Experiment a little. See how it looks, then wash it off. Keep trying until the desired effect is

You may have to apply a basecoat touch up, and let that dry. Follow up with an overlapping touch up of plaster color. If it’s still not quite right, wash it off and try again.

Added tip: When the damaged area is larger, you may have to use a trowel.

Success comes, of course, when you can no longer see the dent in the wall.  And, your plaster touch up is flawless. When done correctly, you should not be able to locate the damaged area at all. The Venetian colors and overlap of the textures aid you in this process.

Recapping “Final note:” It is important to remember that knowing how to repair a minor flaw in a wall is exceeded only by one’s ability to follow the procedures in order to guarantee, hopefully, the best results.

You can learn by making the repair yourself. If you have a professional do the repair, you will  learn virtually nothing at all. Of course, if you are a professional in a field other than painting, leave wall repair to someone else. It may your only reasonable choice.

Read: Part III: Repairing a Wall Painted with Semi-Gloss or Gloss Paint.

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